Skip Navigation
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex
Pacific Region

Login

Viewing category: Siletz Bay NWR
«-Previous Page   1 2 
May 26, 2011
Hillside Stabilization and Repair Proposed at Siletz Bay NWR
The Service proposes to allow the City of Lincoln City to repair and stabilize a small section of hillside on Siletz Bay NWR to prevent continued erosion from blocking the access road into Lincoln City's Wastewater Treatment Plant. Review the Compatibility Determination (796 KB PDF) and send comments to oregoncoast@fws.gov. Public review and comment period begins 5/26/11 and ends 6/8/11.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 10:33 AM
May 6, 2008
Explore Siletz Bay NWR with a guided canoe and kayak tour
Back by popular demand! The US Fish and Wildlife Service invites you to explore Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) during a series of ten guided canoe and kayak trips during June, July, and August 2008. On these outings visitors will spend about one and a half hours paddling through the heart of Siletz Bay NWR as they learn about the natural history of some of the plants, wading birds, waterfowl and other wildlife that inhabit the estuary. Siletz Bay NWR also consists of some of the most scenic estuarine habitat along the Pacific Coast Scenic Byway. On either side of the Highway 101, starched skeleton trees jut forth from the estuary and are reminiscent of a time when the salt marsh was diked. Osprey, Red-tailed Hawks and occasionally Bald Eagles can be seen roosting at the top of these snags. A variety of estuarine dependant birds including Great Blue Heron, Great Egret and many species of waterfowl can be seen foraging in the tidally influenced waters. The refuge also provides nursery grounds for Coho and Chinook salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout. Siletz Bay NWR was established to protect salt marsh, brackish marsh, tidal sloughs, mudflats, coniferous and deciduous forestland and the wildlife that depends on these unique habitats. Don't miss your chance to come out for a personal interpretive tour of Siletz Bay NWR!

Participants must provide their own canoe or kayak for each trip. The site allows for a primitive drop-in site with no dock therefore we ask that you dress appropriately for walking on a muddy bank and potentially inclement weather. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can provide binoculars and field guides to use during the trip if needed. Space is limited; please call ahead to make a reservation. The tours will take place at the following dates and times:

Sunday, June 1 11:15am-1:15pm
Wednesday, June 4 2:00pm-4:00pm
Thursday, June 12 8:30am-10:30am
Sunday, June 29 10:00am-12:00pm
Tuesday, July 8 5:30pm-7:30pm
Tuesday, July 15 12:30pm-2:30pm
Thursday, July 17 1:30pm-3:30pm
Saturday, July 19 2:30pm-4:30pm
Friday, August 1 1:15pm-3:15pm
Saturday, August 9 7:45am-9:45am

Participants will meet at the end of the old highway 101 spur road on the east side of the new Highway 101 at the time listed for the date. From Lincoln City go south on Highway 101, after crossing the Siletz River make the first left (east) onto the old highway 101 and meet at the end. From Newport go north on Highway 101, cross Millport Slough and make the first right (east) onto the old highway 101. The old highway 101 turn off is directly across from the Frank Nettleship Dental Office. For further information please see the Oregon Coast NWR Complex website: www.fws.gov/oregoncoast or contact Annie Kilby directly by phone 541-867-4550 (office), 541-270-5606 (cell), or via email at anne_kilby@fws.gov.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 2:52 PM
June 28, 2007
Explore Siletz Bay by Canoe/Kayak
Back by popular demand! The US Fish and Wildlife Service invites you to explore Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) during a series of twelve guided canoe and kayak trips during June, July, and August 2007. On these outings visitors will spend about two hours paddling through the heart of Siletz Bay NWR as they learn about the natural history of some of the wading birds, waterfowl and other wildlife that inhabit the estuary. Siletz Bay NWR also consists of some of the most scenic estuarine habitat along the Pacific Coast Scenic Byway. On either side of the Highway 101, starched skeleton trees jut forth from the estuary and are reminiscent of a time when the salt marsh was diked. Osprey, Red-tailed Hawks and occasionally Bald Eagles can be seen roosting at the top of these snags. A variety of estuarine dependant birds including Great Blue Heron, Great Egret and many species of waterfowl can be seen foraging in the tidally influenced waters. The refuge also provides nursery grounds for coho and chinook salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout. Siletz Bay NWR was established to protect salt marsh, brackish marsh, tidal sloughs, mudflats, coniferous and deciduous forestland and the wildlife that depends on these unique habitats. Dont miss your chance to come out for a personal interpretive tour of Siletz Bay NWR!

Participants must provide their own canoe or kayak for each trip. The site allows for a primitive drop-in site with no dock therefore we ask that you dress appropriately for walking on a muddy bank and potentially inclement weather. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can provide binoculars and field guides to use during the trip if needed. Space is limited; please call ahead to make a reservation. The tours will take place at the following dates and times:

Tuesday, June 5 4:30pm-7:00pm
Thursday, June 7 5:45pm-8:15pm
Tuesday, June 19 4:15Pm-6:45pm
Thursday, June 21 5:45pm-8:15pm

Tuesday, July 10 9:30am-12:00pm
Tuesday, July 24 9:15am-11:45am
Thursday, July 26 11:00am-1:30pm

Tuesday, August 14 1:30pm-4:00pm
Thursday, August 16 2:30pm-5:00pm

Participants will meet at the the end of the old highway 101 spur road on the east side of the new Highway 101. From Lincoln City go south on Highway 101, after crossing the Siletz River make the first left (east) onto the old highway 101 and meet at the end. From Newport go north on Highway 101, cross Millport Slough and make the first right East) onto the old highway 101. The old highway 101 turn off is directly across from the Frank Nettleship Dental Office. For further information please see the Oregon Coast NWR Complex website: www.fws.gov/oregoncoast or call Emily Eppinger at 541-867-4550.

Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 12:50 PM
June 22, 2006
Explore Siletz Bay NWR by Canoe or Kayak.
The Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex invites you to explore Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge during a series of five guided canoe and kayak trips during July and August, 2006. Bring your own canoe or kayak and spend two hours paddling through the heart of Siletz Bay NWR. Learn about the natural history of some of the wading birds, waterfowl and other wildlife that inhabit the estuary. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will have extra binoculars and field guides to borrow if needed.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 12:42 PM
March 23, 2006
Stolen Canoes Recovered
Four canoes along with Personal Flotation Devices and paddles that were stolen from Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge in December 2005 have been returned. Refuge Biologist David Pitkin received a late night phone call in early March from the Lincoln County Sheriff's Department stating that a kayaker had noticed the canoes and associated gear were stashed under the Drift Creek Bridge. When Pitkin investigated he discovered that everything, excepting one PFD, was returned and in great condition. In the time between the theft and the recovery Otis residents Mark and Betty Nicholson read about the theft in the Lincoln City News-Guard and having been former environmental educators generously donated a 16' fiberglass canoe, two PFD's and two wooden paddles. They were concerned that the Refuge's environmental education program whose students depend on the use of canoes to conduct on-the-ground research in Siletz Bay and Nestucca Bay Refuge had been halted. Their donation kept the education program afloat and possibly encouraged the thief to return the stolen canoes. In the end all refuge staff, volunteers, and participating students are happy to have the canoes back for the use of refuge biology programs and environmental education.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 4:48 PM
January 12, 2006
Students' Environmental Education Program Ended Due to Theft
Four canoes, along with six paddles and twelve personal flotation devices, were stolen from buildings located on the Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge sometime between December 28th and 30th , 2005. These canoes were the primary means of transport for local and Salem-area middle school students using the Siletz Bay and Nestucca Bay Refuges as outdoor classrooms to conduct field-based research projects for the past four years. Using the refuge canoes, student-designed projects have explored the placement and role of large woody debris as fish habitat in the recently restored Millport Slough, inventoried frog populations in Neskowin Marsh, and investigated water quality in tidal marsh habitats.

"For these students, having the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in real life research situations is invaluable," said Mike Weddle, primary instructor at the Jane Goodall Environmental Middle School in Salem . "The on-going research projects that the students have been conducting on the refuges are the most exciting part of the school year and they would really like to continue them. The projects are great fun, they're good science, and they are making an important contribution to the Fish and Wildlife Service and to the environment," said Weddle. The theft of the canoes and associated equipment means that students will now be denied the unique and perhaps life-changing opportunity for a hands-on learning experience in these difficult to access marsh habitats.

The canoes also served a critical role in furthering the mission of the biological program at the Oregon Coast NWR Complex, where they were used by biologists and volunteers to conduct important fisheries research and monitor the progress of marsh restoration projects at three estuaries along the Oregon coast. In addition, the canoes were used for many Refuge-led seasonal public tours of the Siletz Bay Refuge. These popular tours, always full to capacity, allowed visitors to enjoy a free guided interpretive canoe tour of refuge areas which are usually closed to the public to prevent wildlife disturbance. All future tours for the spring and summer are now cancelled due to the theft.

The stolen Old Town brand canoes were two 17 ft. 4 in. 'Discovery' model, one 14 ft. 7 in. 'Guide' model, and one 12 ft. 'Pack' model. Anyone with information regarding the theft of these canoes, paddles and PFD's is urged to contact Lincoln County Sheriff Deputy Bruce McGuire at 541 265-4231. For more information on the Environmental Education programs on Siletz Bay and Nestucca Bay Refuges please visit our education page.
Posted by the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Staff at 3:52 PM
«-Previous Page   1 2 
sun mon tue wed thu fri sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31    

Recent News
Archives
Categories
Bookmarks
Search
Looking for something specific?
Try a simple search of the key word.

Syndicate This Site


America's National Wildlife Refuges... where wildlife comes first!

Pacific Region National Wildlife Refuge System Home
Pacific Region Home

Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex Home | News | Events | CCP | Education | Wildlife | Maps and Directions | Volunteers | FAQ | Links | Contact Us
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Home Page | Department of the Interior | USA.gov | About the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Accessibility 
Privacy | Notices | Disclaimer | FOIA
* * * * *
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR, 97365
Phone: 541-867-4550. Email: Oregoncoast@fws.gov.
 
Site last updated March 8, 2011