Operation Poseur Photos
Conserving the Nature of America

The slow loris (a species protected under the CITES treaty) is a primate native to south and southeast Asia. Credit: DOJ   The wooly-necked stork is a tropical migratory bird found in the Eastern Hemisphere. Credit: DOJ
Carcass seized from defendant as evidence of wildlife trafficking. Credit: DOJ
The slow loris (a species protected under the CITES treaty) is a primate native to south and southeast Asia. Credit: DOJ   The wooly-necked stork is a tropical migratory bird found in the Eastern Hemisphere. Credit: DOJ   Carcass seized from defendant as evidence of wildlife trafficking. Credit: DOJ
 
Wooly-necked stork carcass seized from defendant as evidence of wildlife trafficking. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ
Wooly-necked stork carcass seized from defendant as evidence of wildlife trafficking. Credit: DOJ
  DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ
 
DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ
DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ   DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ
 
  DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ  
DeMolina used taxidermied wildlife carcasses and parts to create the "sculptures" shown here; he often combined parts from multiple species in a single work. Credit: DOJ
More Case Photos (PDF)

Last updated: March 2, 2012
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