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Endangered Species Act 40th anniversary to be highlighted at visitor center

12_20_13_Article_ESA

The National Elk Refuge is pleased to join the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s commemoration of the Endangered Species Act 40th anniversary. The Service wraps up a year-long commemoration of the Act that has been so successful in stabilizing populations of species at risk, preventing the extinction of others, and conserving the habitats upon which they depend.

 


photo credit: US Fish & Wildlife Service National Digital Library 

December 23, 2013 (NER 13-29 ) 

The National Elk Refuge is pleased to join the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s commemoration of the Endangered Species Act 40th anniversary. The Service wraps up a year-long commemoration of the Act that has been so successful in stabilizing populations of species at risk, preventing the extinction of others, and conserving the habitats upon which they depend.

President Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law on December 28, 1973. This Saturday, December 28, naturalists will be on hand at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center to provide more information about the Act and offer a fun and challenging quiz spotlighting some of Wyoming’s threatened and endangered species. The Endangered Species Act will be the focus of an informal naturalist “Feature Creature” program from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm in the Visitor Center lobby as well as on the wildlife viewing excursions offered at 9:30 am and 1:30 pm. 

When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of “esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people.” It further expressed concern that many of our nation’s native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct. The purpose of the Act is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps administer the Endangered Species Act and has the primary responsibility for terrestial (dry land) and freshwater organisms.The Commerce Department’s National Marine Fisheries Service shares responsibilities through administration of marine wildlife such as whales and anadromous fish such as salmon. As of December 20, 2013, the FWS had listed 2,145 species worldwide as endangered or threatened, with 1,519 occurring in the United States. 

Those unable to stop by the Visitor Center on December 28 still have an opportunity to learn more about the Endangered Species Act by clicking on the links below.

Wyoming Endangered Species Quiz 

Wyoming Endangered Species Quiz answer sheet 

Wyoming Endangered Species Quiz Bonus Round: What's in a Name? 

US Fish & Wildlife Service Endangered Species web page  

US Fish & Wildlife Service Endangered Species Facebook page 

 

 

Last Updated: Dec 24, 2013
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