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Fire danger rating lowered to Moderate

Recent rains received throughout the Teton Interagency Fire area have given firefighters a much-needed respite from fire activity and resulted in the fire danger dropping to Moderate. 

September 4, 2013 (NER 13-20)

Recent rains received throughout the Teton Interagency Fire area have given firefighters a much-needed respite from fire activity and resulted in the fire danger dropping to Moderate. The welcome moisture also minimized activity on several lightning-caused fires in the Teton Interagency Fire area. The following fires are exhibiting minimal fire behavior; however, Teton Interagency Fire personnel will continue to actively monitor and patrol these areas as conditions warrant:

  • The 200-acre Snake Fire three miles east of the south entrance to Yellowstone National Park on the border of the Bridger-Teton National Forest, but primarily in Yellowstone
  • The 180-acre Moose Fire in Grand Teton National Park on the west side of Jackson Lake in the upper basin of Moose Creek
  • The 1,065-acre Green Fire in the Upper Green River on the Pinedale Ranger District
  • The 698-acre Kendall Mountain Fire in the Bridger Wilderness, east of Boulder Basin

Currently no closures are associated with these fires, but hunters and other visitors are urged to use caution if traveling near any of these uncontrolled fires or recently burned areas and to be aware of the associated hazards such as falling snags, active flame, rolling rock/debris, and hot smoldering stump holes. 

The Teton Interagency Fire area, which includes Bridger-Teton National Forest, Grand Teton National Park, National Elk Refuge, as well as Lincoln, Sublette, and Teton counties, have dealt with a total of 50 wildland fires so far this year. Approximately one third of those were human caused. More than 145 campfires have been left unattended or abandoned by recreationists. 

Fires can still start easily during Moderate fire danger. Hunters and other forest visitors are reminded not to become complacent with fire while recreating on public lands. Campfires always need to be cold to the touch before leaving them. 

For additional local fire information, visit the Teton Interagency Fire web page.

 

Last Updated: Sep 05, 2013
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