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La Crosse District Revenue Sharing


 U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE ISSUES REVENUE SHARING PAYMENTS
Under the provisions of the Refuge Revenue Sharing Act, payments totaling $60,344
were recently transferred to the City of La Crosse, City of Onalaska, four towns in
La Crosse County, Wisc., and Houston County, Minn. by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
This annual payment is made to local units of government as compensation for the loss of tax revenue on lands that are part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, National Fish Hatcheries, or Waterfowl Production Areas. Locally the payments are for lands administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Navigation Pools 7 and 8 and managed as part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge and for land managed by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center.
Shared revenue funds are derived from the economic use of lands administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plus a supplemental Congressional appropriation. For Fiscal Year 2012, revenues from 2011 and the 2012 supplemental Congressional appropriation were sufficient to provide for a nationwide payment of 23.0% of the full entitlement amount.
In Wisconsin, payments were issued to the City of La Crosse ($638), City of Onalaska ($215), Town of Holland ($8,692), Town of Onalaska ($9,679), Town of Campbell ($12,237), and the Town of Shelby ($3,249). In Minnesota, Houston County received a payment of $25,634.
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U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
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These funds may be used by local governments for any appropriate governmental function.
For more information, contact the La Crosse District Office of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge at 608/779-2399. The office is located in the new facility at N5727 County Road Z on Brice Prairie. Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
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The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge is the most visited refuge in the United States. The refuge extends 261 miles along the Upper Mississippi River from Wabasha, Minn. to Rock Island, Ill., protecting and preserving habitat for migratory birds, fish, and a variety of other wildlife.
In addition to being the most visited refuge in the country, the “Upper Miss” Refuge has the added complexity of a major navigation system, including 11 locks and dams, within its boundary. It is also a world-class fish and wildlife area which harbors 306 species of birds; 119 species of fish; more than 300 active bald eagle nests; thousands of heron and egret nests; spectacular concentrations of canvasback ducks, tundra swans, and white pelicans; and several threatened or endangered species
Last Updated: Oct 24, 2012
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