June 2012

R5 Science Seminar Series 2012

Date: Thursday, June 14th, 12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m., Northeast Region Office Large Auditorium. This seminar will be broadcast on the internet. You will be able to view the presentation by clicking this link: http://www.livestream.com/r5broadcasts. A closed captioned version of the broadcast can be viewed by clicking this link: http://www.ccproductions.com/ccp_streaming.asp?event=FWS-R5.

Title: Integrated Waterbird Management and Monitoring Project: Guiding habitat management at multiple spatial scales using an alphabet soup of acronyms

Presenter: Tim Jones, PhD, Science Coordinator, Atlantic Coast Joint Venture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Abstract: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) programs and partners have a long history of managing wetlands for waterfowl and more recently, other guilds of waterbirds (e.g., shorebirds and long-legged waders). Traditionally, this management has occurred on a site by site basis. While everyone believed their actions were contributing to continental population objectives for these groups of birds, management actions were often made using best professional judgment. The Integrated Waterbird Management and Monitoring (IWMM) project is an ambitious effort based on the paradigms of strategic habitat conservation (SHC) and structured decision making (SDM). The purpose of the project is to provide decision makers information to better manage habitats for waterbirds throughout the non-breeding season at the flyway, regional and local scales. The IWMM project combines standardized monitoring protocols and multiple, linked models at each of three identified spatial scales to guide future management decisions and where to focus time and financial resources on habitat acquisition, restoration or enhancement. Models have been developed that range from Monte Carlo simulations of migration behavior to hierarchical models of counts of birds to multi-state models that allocate funds among sites to maximize benefits to waterbird populations. For the past two years, participants have been collecting field data to update the models in an adaptive framework. The emerging IWMM project is a collaborative effort among conservation partners located along the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, including the Service's administrative Regions 3, 4 and 5, all of the States located in the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, Ducks Unlimited (DU) and several other non-governmental agencies.

Bio: Malcolm "Tim" Jones is the Science Coordinator of the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture. He is responsible for ensuring sound science is used to develop biologically-based conservation plans to deliver all-bird conservation throughout the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture. Dr. Jones has a B.Sc. in Biology from East Tennessee State University, an M.Sc. in Wildlife Science from Auburn University and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Maine. Before joining the Service, Dr. Jones worked as a Research Associate at the University of Minnesota Duluth where he was a co-investigator on a project modeling the potential future effects of timber management on bird populations. Earlier research focused his interest on the interface of avian population dynamics with landscape ecology and computer modeling. Over the last 15 years he has been involved in numerous research projects that have used his experience in statistics, database design, Geographical Information Systems and ecological modeling to further bird conservation.


Date: Thursday, June 28th, 12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m., Northeast Region Office Large Auditorium. This seminar will be broadcast on the internet. You will be able to view the presentation by clicking this link: http://www.livestream.com/r5broadcasts. A closed captioned version of the broadcast can be viewed by clicking this link: http://www.ccproductions.com/ccp_streaming.asp?event=FWS-R5.

Title: Audubon Strategic Plan 2012: A Roadmap for Hemispheric Conservation

Presenter: Michael Burger, Conservation and Science Director, Audubon New York

Abstract: With the release of its 2012 Strategic Plan, the National Audubon Society announced that it was reorganizing by flyway and would focus on five conservation strategies that will allow it to better coordinate its extensive network around the delivery of life-cycle conservation of priority birds. National offices, state programs, education centers, and chapters will be coordinated along four major flyways: Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific. Conservation strategies that will be implemented in each flyway include: (1) putting working lands to work for birds and people, (2) sharing our seas and shores, (3) saving important bird areas, (4) shaping a healthy climate and clean energy future, and (5) creating bird-friendly communities. The Atlantic Flyway consists of approximately 200 Audubon staff members, 8 state offices, 21 education centers, and 157 local Audubon chapters, as well as more than 20 BirdLife International partner organizations throughout the hemisphere. Priority conservation projects of the Atlantic Flyway include eastern forests, coastal stewardship, the Everglades ecosystem, and Long Island Sound; incubator projects include grasslands and shrublands, and salt marshes. Work will involve extensive partnerships at all levels. All priority and incubator projects have project managers, project teams, and project plans, which identify target species and habitats, long-term conservation goals, threats, major strategies, and short- and intermediate-term objectives. A Vice President for the Atlantic Flyway has been hired to oversee and coordinate the effort.

Bio: Mike Burger functions as the chief scientist for Audubon's New York State Office and oversees several of Audubon New York's conservation programs, including the Important Bird Areas program, grassland and shrubland bird conservation work with private landowners, and the forest stewardship program. Additionally, he helps to coordinate Audubon's Atlantic Flyway, which is a framework for increased collaboration and conservation effectiveness across Audubon's network from Maine to Florida and into the Caribbean and Central and South America. Burger earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

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