U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service - Patuxent Research Refuge U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Logo National Wildlife Refuge System Logo FWS Northeast Region

Last Update

Under Construction

National Wildlife Visitor Center
Scout Program Links

Junior Girl Scouts

(Back to Program Link Index)

Requirements filled according to the 2001 Junior Girl Scout Badge Book.

Earth Connections:

1. You can make your study area at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Ask a staff member or volunteer about where the best place would be. The Environmental Education Pavilion is a great place to study ecosystems.

2. The Wildlife Conservation Tram Tour is a great way to see succession happening right on the refuge. Ask the tram guide to show you specific areas where succession occurs, such as meadows turning into forests.

3. The Forests of Patuxent Trail Guide, available at the front desk, points out several species of trees on our trails. Walk the trails around the National Wildlife Visitor Center to see many other species as well.

4. Look along the trails for tree stumps to read the tree rings.

5. Bring your own game or ask a staff member or volunteer about games that show plant and animal relationships. The area by Goose Pond is good for playing games.

6. The Patuxent Research Refuge is one of over 500 refuges across the country set up to protect wildlife and plants. The refuge is unique in that it was specifically created to support wildlife research. Take the tram tour or ask a volunteer or staff member about research that has been done here and how we use it to help wildlife.

7. The On the Brink exhibit shows several species which are endangered, many because they could not adapt to changes people made in their environment. The Sea Otter pod shows how seas otters are adapted to their aquatic environments and the Canvasback Duck pod shows how they adapted to changes in their food when people impacted their habitat.

8. The Bayscape garden at the National Wildlife Visitor Center is planted with all native plant species. Ask a staff member or volunteer to tell you more about the species planted there.

9. Choose a study area on the refuge. Remember that areas will change with the seasons, and some plants and animals will only be found there at certain times.

10. The Global Concerns exhibit discusses seven environmental problems that are occurring worldwide. Use them to learn more about each problem and ways to fix them.

 

Eco-Action:

8. Volunteers are always welcome at the Patuxent Research Refuge. We have many projects you can participate in to help improve the environment. Stop by the front desk to get more information about what you can do to help.

10. A well-known pioneer in environmental concerns was Rachel Carson. The information she wrote in her books came from research done at Patuxent Research Refuge. Look in the bookstore at the National Wildlife Visitor Center or check out a book from your library about Rachel Carson to learn more about her work in helping the environment. The visitor center also offers a movie on the life of Rachel Carson. Call ahead for movie schedules.

hands holding the earth

Finding Your Way:

6. Make a map of the National Wildlife Visitor Center or one of the trails on the refuge.

 

Hiker:

7. Explore the trails around the National Wildlife Visitor Center or at the Patuxent Research Refuge North Tract. Ask a staff member or volunteer to help you identify the animals and plants you saw.

10. The Patuxent Research Refuge has 5 miles of trails at the National Wildlife Visitor Center (301-497-5760) and 20 miles at the North Tract (301-776-3090). Call or stop by for more information.

 

Plants and Animals:

9. The Patuxent Research Refuge has several plant and animal species which can be considered pests. Ask a staff member or volunteer to tell you more about some of them such as the deer tick, European starling, poison ivy, and chestnut blight.

 

Wildlife:

2. There are many plants and animals on the Patuxent Research Refuge which are perfect for observing and using for art. Pick a spot and bring along your pencils and camera.

5. Poisonous plants and animals which may be on the refuge include poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and black widow spiders. Learn to identify these and how you can avoid them. Poison ivy is the one to be the most aware of here.

6. The On the Brink exhibit shows several endangered and recovering species. Species from Maryland include the Indiana Bat, Piping plover, and Delmarva Fox squirrel.

7. The viewing pod in the exhibits has several binoculars and spotting scopes you can use to view wildlife on Lake Redington.

8. There are many species that live on and migrate through the Patuxent Research Refuge during all seasons of the year. Ask at the front desk for a list of species found here. Bring a field guide and take a hike to find birds and animals to identify.

10. Pick an animal that you can easily observe at the Patuxent Research Refuge. (Remember some animals are shy and secretive and not easily observed.) Chose one that you will be able to watch for some time to see what it likes to eat, where it spends its time, and other behaviors.

eagle



Your Outdoor Surroundings:

5. If you like outdoor photography, hiking or bird-watching, the Patuxent Research Refuge is a great place to try it out. Ask a staff member or volunteer if there is someone who can help you get started.

6. There are many different objects that can be found on the refuge to be classified. Remember to stay on the trails and if you pick anything up, put it back where you found it.

7. Many women working or volunteering at the Patuxent Research Refuge spend their time mostly outdoors. Call or stop by the National Wildlife Visitor Center (301-497-5760) to arrange an interview.

8. Many small nature objects can be found to try this fun activity. Remember to put items back where you found them after you finish using them.

9. At the National Wildlife Visitor Center you can enjoy the trails by taking along The Forests of Patuxent Guide. These guides point out interesting features along the trails and are available at the front desk. Also, try a sensory trail to see what kinds of things you can see, hear, touch and smell.

Rocks Rock:

2. Take a hike on the trails to see how erosion is occurring. Also, take the tram tour and ask the tram guide to show you how erosion is effecting Harding Spring Pond.

4. The Environmental Education Pavilion has soil corers which can be used to examine the different layers of soil. Call the National Wildlife Visitor Center (301-497-5760) ahead of time to learn more about using this equipment.

6. Volunteers are always welcome at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Stop by the front desk to get more information about any trail maintenance you can help with.

 

Patuxent Research Refuge
Northeast Region National Wildlife Refuge System Home
Northeast Region Home


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Home Page | Department of the Interior  | USA.gov  | About the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  | Accessibility  | Privacy  | Notices  | Disclaimer  | FOIA