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National Wildlife Visitor Center
Scout Program Links

Boy Scout

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Refer to the 2000 Boy Scout Requirements book to see the specific requirements.


Second Class Rank Requirements

#5 Visit the refuge to find and identify at least ten types of wild animals. Make sure to bring a journal and/or camera to document the animals or evidence that you find. Remember, take only photographs, leave only footprints.

First Class Rank Requirements

#6 Visit the Bayscape areas at the National Wildlife Visitor Center to identify at least 10 types of native plants.

Art

#3 Visit the National Wildlife Visitor Center or the Patuxent Research Refuge North Tract. Hike a trail and chose a view to record in an art medium.

#6 Explore the trails at the Patuxent Research Refuge to find a subject for your art.

Bird Study

#1 The Wildlife Telltales Exhibit in the National Wildlife Visitor Center explains how studying birds can give warning signs of changes in the environment. The Getting a Handle on Habitats display shows how loss of habitat affects bird populations and how they are monitored.

#3 The Viewing Pod has binoculars and spotting scopes you can use the observe birds on Lake Redington.

#5 Look for birds in the wetland, lake, meadow, and forest habitats near the National Wildlife Visitor Center. Bring a field guide along to help identify them. A list of common birds on the refuge is available from the front desk.

#6 You may want to listen to recordings of common birds before you go to help you identify what you hear in the field. Walk the trails or take a tram tour to see and hear many species of birds.

#7a The Patuxent Research Refuge offers many birding trips throughout the year. Check our current schedule to find out about the next one.

Camping

#9. Primitive camping can be done at the Patuxent Research Refuge North Tract. Call the North Tract Contact Station at 301-776-3090 for more information.

Cycling

#8. Cycling can be done on the Patuxent Research Refuge North Tract. Check at the Contact Station for more information about which trails are open and the most suitable.

Disability Awareness

#4 The National Wildlife Visitor Center and grounds were created to be accessible to as many people as possible. The Cash Lake fishing pier, 2 mile of the trails, and the visitor center are all accessible to wheelchairs and strollers. Weekend movies are shown with closed captioning for the enjoyment of everyone. Compare the visitor center to other public areas. Talk to a volunteer or staff member if you have any suggestions on how to make the visitor center more accessible to everyone.

Environmental Science

#2 Many of the terms can be found in the Global Concerns and Lifecycles exhibits at the National Wildlife Visitor Center.

#3 Background information for the following experiments can be found in the National Wildlife Visitor Center.

(a) Ecology

(2) Global Concerns - Global Warming

(c) Water Pollution

(2) Global Concerns - Ocean Pollution

(d) Land Pollution

(1) Global Concerns - Land Exploitation

(e) Endangered Species

(1) and (2) On the Brink shows 14 different species nearing either extinction or recovery. The Delmarva Fox Squirrel, Indiana Bat and Piping Plover are endangered species found in Maryland.

#8 Explore The Wisdom of Wildness exhibits for lots of information on how people work in environmental fields. Watch the videos in the Life Cycles exhibit to learn what researchers are doing to help wildlife. Talk to a volunteer about how they work with the environment.

Fish and Wildlife Management

#1 Take a tram tour or talk to a staff member or volunteer about the meaning of fish and wildlife conservation and management. Look in the Wisdom of Wildness exhibit to learn about many types of conservation and management practices.

#2 Explore the Global Concerns and Handle on Habitats exhibits to learn about environmental problems.

#3 Take a tram tour to learn about efforts to help wildlife. Talk to a staff member or volunteer about things you can do in your own yard to help wildlife, such as putting up bird boxes, planting wild flowers and trees, and recycling.

#4 Go on a tram tour to learn about wildlife management practices being used at Patuxent. Also talk to a staff member or volunteer for more information about things going on around the visitor center.

#5a Ask at the information desk for instructions on how to make a bluebird box.

#6a Observe 25 species of wildlife on the refuge. Bring field guides and binoculars to help you identify the different animals that you see. Try looking in a variety of habitats to find different kinds of animals. Also look for animal signs such as homes, tracks, or scat.

Fishing

#7 Contact the National Wildlife Visitor Center (301- 497-5760) or North Tract Contact Station (301- 776-3090) to inquire about fishing opportunities on the refuge.

Forestry

#1 The trails around the National Wildlife Visitor Center and the Patuxent Research Refuge North Tract have many tree and shrub species that you can identify. Be sure to bring a field identification book along. Ask a staff member or volunteer to show you where you can see succession happening.

#2b Walk along the trails and look for stumps to observe. You may want to sketch or photograph the ring pattern. It may be interesting to research weather patterns for past years and try to determine which rings correspond to years with droughts or good rainfall.

#3a Look in the Deforestation section of the Global Concerns exhibit to learn about the importance of trees.

#3b Look in the Chesapeake Bay section on the Handle on Habitats exhibit to learn about local water supplies.

#6ab Observe the Deforestation and Land Exploitation sections of the Global Concerns exhibit to learn about specific problems that damage forests.

#7a Patuxent Research Refuge has many volunteer opportunities available to help in the management of our refuge. Inquire at the front desk for more information.

Hiking

#5 The Patuxent Research Refuge has many hiking trails available. Inquire at the National Wildlife Visitor Center or the North Tract Contact Station for more information.

Mammal Study

#3a The Patuxent Research Refuge has many different habitats available to study including wetlands, meadows, and forests.

#3b There are many types of mammals that live on the refuge, but many may be difficult to view. Walk the trails and look for mammal signs such as homes, food remains, droppings, or tracks. You may want to research the different types of mammals found in this area so you will have an idea of what to look for. You may want to bring a field guide to help you identify what you see.

Nature

#1 Observe the animals and displays in the On the Brink and Life Cycles exhibits to learn how animals (particularly the Red-cockaded woodpecker, Puerto Rican parrot, and Canvasback duck) depend on plants. Otters depend on plants also, but in an indirect way. Find out how.

Birds

(a) Look for birds in the wetland, meadow and forest habitats near the National Wildlife Visitor Center. Bring a field guide along to help identify them. A list of common birds found on the refuge is also available at the front desk.

(b) Ask at the information desk for instructions on how to make a bluebird box.

Mammals

(a) Ask at the front desk of the National Wildlife Visitor Center for a list of mammals found on the refuge. There are many types of mammals that live on the refuge but many may be difficult to view. Walk the trails and look for signs such as homes, food remains, droppings, or tracks.

Fish

(a) Contact the National Wildlife Visitor Center (301- 497-5760) or North Tract Contact Station (301- 776-3090) to inquire about fishing opportunities on the refuge.

Plants

(a) Walk the trails of the Patuxent Research Refuge to look for trees, shrubs, and other plants. Bring along a field guide to help identify them.

Soil and Water Conservation

2ab Look at the Land Exploitation and Deforestation sections of the Global Concerns exhibit for information on soils.

#4ad Observe the Chesapeake Bay section of the Handle on Habitats exhibit to learn about watersheds and river basins.

#5cde Explore the Global Concerns and Handle on Habitats exhibits to learn how human-environment interactions effect the land and different types of habitats.

#6ab Look at the Ocean Pollution section of the Global Concerns exhibit and the Chesapeake Bay and Central Valley of California sections of Handle on Habitats exhibit for information on water pollution.

#7a3 The National Wildlife Visitor Center is located on the Patuxent Research Refuge, a National Wildlife Refuge. Take a tram tour to learn about how the waste water from the Visitor Center is treated and how erosion is controlled near Lake Redington.

 

Hornaday Award

Complete the required merit badges. Many of them can be worked on at the National Wildlife Visitor Center.

 

World Conservation Award

The badges required for this award can be worked on at the National Wildlife Visitor Center.

 

 
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