New York Field Office
Northeast Region

News Archive 2008

12/23/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Final Study Plan for Waterfowl Injury Assessment (Environmental Contaminants):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released the Final Study Plan for Waterfowl Injury Assessment: Determining PCB Concentrations in Hudson River Resident Waterfowl, work being conducted as part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA). The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees -- New York State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) -- are working cooperatively to conduct the NRDA. The Final Study Plan is for an investigation of PCB contaminant levels in Hudson River waterfowl in order to determine whether PCB concentrations found in edible portions of resident ducks exceed tolerance levels established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA), pursuant to the DOI NRDA regulations at 43 CFR 11.62(f)(1)(ii). The study objectives are: 1) determine the concentrations of PCBs in waterfowl resident to the Hudson River; 2) determine proportions of waterfowl and waterfowl eggs having PCB concentrations that exceed the existing USFDA tolerance for those residues in poultry; and 3) determine the PCB contribution by adult mallards to juvenile mallards via PCB transfer in eggs based upon the calculation of PCB mass. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Final Study Plan for the waterfowl injury assessment: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/index.html. Other documents for the Hudson River NRDA are also available at that website.

12/17/08 Comments on Massena-Grasse River Study Results (Federal Projects):

Massena-Grasse RiverComments on the Massena-Grasse River Study results are being filed.  Additional work is needed on fish passage, particularly for lake sturgeon, ice management, tailrace water levels, and benthic macroinvertebrates.  Egg traps collected walleye eggs, leading to speculation that an international population of walleye from the St. Lawrence River is utilizing the rapids (that would be flooded by the proposed project) for spawning. 

 

 

12/8/08 Poster from SETAC Workshop (Environmental Contaminants):

Earlier this year, NYFO Environmental Contaminants Biologist Kathryn Jahn participated in a workshop held in Fairmont, Montana, sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), entitled, “The Nexus Between Ecological Risk Assessment and Natural Resource Damage Assessment.” While work on publications from this workshop continues, a poster on the results of the workshop was presented at the November 2008 SETAC meeting.

11/28/08 Karner blue butterfly habitat restored (Endangered species):

Nine NYFO staff and our primary volunteer, Nelson Babcock, assisted the NYSDEC with the clearing of 1.5 acres of overgrown Christmas trees from Karner blue butterfly habitat.  Law enforcement special agent, Bob Garabedian, gave assistance as well.  The project was at the old Spencer Christmas Tree Farm in the Town of Northumberland, Saratoga County, recently purchased by the NYSDEC through the use of non-traditional Section 6 funds (Recovery Land Acquisition).  This used to be one of the prolific Karner sites in New York, however, the severe shading of much of the site by the old evergreens, along with aspen and oak, have resulted in recent significant declines.  While there is more habitat restoration to be done at the site, we are thrilled that the site is protected, that we were able to accomplish a great deal in one day, and that Karners now have a chance to succeed at the site. 

11/18/08 Landscape Planning in Owasco Flats, Cayuga County, New York:

Wetland Restoration photo, Owasco Flats NYStaff Biologist Sandie Doran is working with local watershed groups such as the Owasco Watershed Lake Association, the Owasco Lakefront Owners Association, the Owasco Flats Nature Reserve, Inc. and local stakeholders to educate the public on 1) the importance of protecting wetlands and water bodies 2) establishing buffer areas along streams and wetlands to reduce erosion, sedimentation and nonpoint source pollutants such as phosphorus and excess nutrients and 3) how to protect vital spawning areas to improve the Owasco Lake fishery.  Sandie recently conducted two presentations that reached approximately 80 people.  Sandie coordinated with PFW Biologist, Eric Rozowski, to highlight two recently completed wetland restoration projects located in the Owasco Flats. 


11/6/08 Lake Sturgeon Movement on the Grasse River (Federal Projects):

The New York Field Office participated in a series of meetings on the Massena-Grasse Hydroelectric Project. Fish passage options were discussed on the first day. The Service’s fishway engineer outlined various alternatives and described the pros and cons of each. In particular, we are concerned that an effective lake sturgeon ladder cannot be designed. The other two days were spent discussing results of 2007/2008 licensing studies.

11/5/08 Regional Transmission Line Gets Attention (Federal Projects):

A planned 200-mile long electric transmission line is the subject of public hearings and information meetings being held across central and southern New York. The meetings, held by the New York State Public Service Commission, are designed to inform the public and provide an opportunity for input on project development. NYFO biologist Tim Sullivan attended one meeting, requesting that the Service be kept in the loop as the project progresses. The New York Regional Interconnect project would provide a 1200 megawatt direct current facility to transport mostly wind generated electricity from upstate areas to New York City. However, some opposition has been expressed by the public and many Congressional staff.

10/31/08 North American Bat Research Symposium (Endangered Species):

New York Field Office Biologists took advantage of the proximity of this international meeting to our field office (it was held in Scranton, PA) and participated in numerous informative sessions. As part of an entire session on White-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, Endangered Species Biologist Coleman gave a presentation on Service efforts to understand and deal with WNS and provided information on funding opportunities for researchers. There were many sessions on the effects of windpower on bats, an issue of great interest to the NYFO. Also in attendance were Robyn Niver who helped with conference organization, Anne Secord, and Project Leader David Stilwell.

10/23/08 White-nose syndrome absent in Jamesville indiana bats (Endangered species):


indiana bats 2008

A team of biologists from NYFO, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and Cornell University braved the cold fall nights of central New York on September 30 and October 7 to examine the condition of bats returning to the hibernaculum in Jamesville.  We examined over 40 bats and all appeared to be in good health.  The Jamesville site is one of the few hibernacula in New York that were believed to be unaffected by white-nose syndrome in the winter of 2008 and is an important Indiana bat site for the region.  Left: A back-lighting technique is used to examine wing membranes for scarring and damage associated with White-nose Syndrome.

10/14/08 New DOI/FWS Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment Web Site (Environmental Contaminants):

Over ten years ago, the Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees issued a Preassessment Screen Determination for the Hudson River. Since that determination that a natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) is warranted for the Hudson River the Trustees have publicly released over 65 documents for the ongoing NRDA. Over the years these have been posted sequentially on the DOI/FWS Hudson River NRDA web site as they were released. Because of the volume of information that website contained, it has now been reorganized to facilitate the public’s finding specific information. The new Hudson River NRDA Home Page is: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/hudsonriver/. Documents on the web site are organized by phase of work, with the newest documents within each category at the top of each section. Recent publications (new releases) can be found at the very top of the web page.

10/14/08 WTOP News Article: Bats Needn't Give Fright this Halloween (Endangered species):

http://www.wtop.com/?nid=773&sid=1496480

10/9/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Responsiveness Summary for 2008 Avian Injury Plan (Environmental Contaminants):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a Responsiveness Summary for the Study Plan for an Avian Injury Study, Year 3 (2008), as part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA). The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees -- New York State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Department of the Interior -- are working cooperatively to conduct the NRDA. The Responsiveness Summary provides Trustee agency responses to public comments on and questions about the Trustees’ Study Plan for Avian Injury Study, Year3 (2008), Draft for Public Review and Comment, dated March 17, 2008, released by the Trustees for public review and comment. A Final Study Plan for Year 3 (2008), dated June 30, 2008, was subsequently released by the Trustees. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Responsiveness Summary and other documents for the Hudson River NRDA: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/hudsonriver

9/30/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Fact Sheet for Sediment Toxicity Pilot Study for the Hudson River (Environmental Contaminants):The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a Fact Sheet for a preliminary investigation regarding sediment toxicity and associated injuries to natural resources as part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA).


9/26/08 Eel Ladder a Success! (Federal Projects):

The eel ladder at the St. Lawrence-FDR Power Project has passed nearly 25,000 eels this year, more than double the 2007 total.  About a month remains in the passage season, although passage frequently declines rapidly towards the end of the season.  This ladder is considered to be state-of-the-art and has been very successful. 


eel ladder


9/17/08 Delphi Flow Management Study, Natural Dam (Federal Projects):

The NYFO participated in the Delphi Flow Management Study for the Natural Dam Project on the Oswegatchie River.  Lake sturgeon spawning was a key management goal; however, appropriate substrate was lacking.  This bypassed reach appears to be best suited for fish passage and macroinvertebrate production, with some habitat available for riffle‑dwelling species and some deep pool habitat. 


Oswegatchie River - Delphi

9/10/08 Hudson River NRDA: Fact Sheet for Waterfowl Injury Assessment (Environmental Contaminants):

PCBs in Hudson River Resident Waterfowl:
A Fact Sheet for an injury study of Hudson River resident waterfowl has been posted on the DOI/FWS Hudson River NRDA web site. This study is part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) for the Hudson River being carried out jointly by New York State, the United States Department of the Interior, and the United States Department of Commerce (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The public and the party(ies) responsible for the contamination were invited to review a Draft Study Plan, dated May 7, 2007, for this work and provide feedback on the proposed approach described in that Draft Study Plan during a public comment period held during June 2007. The work is ongoing. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Fact Sheet: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/HudsonRiver.cfm.

9/3/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Data Report and Fact Sheet for 2004 Amphibian Preliminary Investigation (Environmental Contaminants):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a Data Report and Fact Sheet for a preliminary investigation of amphibian breeding habitat and screening of breeding pool sediments for PCBs conducted in 2004 as part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA). The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees -- New York State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Department of the Interior -- are working cooperatively to conduct the NRDA. This preliminary investigation confirms that Hudson River amphibians are exposed to PCBs. Further, based on this investigation, PCB levels in sediments from known amphibian breeding areas of the Hudson River are at ecologically significant levels, suggesting the potential for injury to these organisms. However, it does not appear that the Hudson River study area contains suitably sized populations of the target species, in particular the northern leopard frog, to use in a future field-based amphibian injury study focused solely on resident frogs. Accordingly, the Trustees are investigating additional options to assess amphibian injury, including the potential conduct of a laboratory-based injury study. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Data Report and Fact Sheet on the 2004 amphibian preliminary investigation: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/HudsonRiver.cfm.
leopard frog

8/18/08 Current Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail studies (Endangered Species):

USFWS biologists have been collecting data this summer to learn more about the basic ecology of the Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail (COAS), an endangered invertebrate endemic to one waterfall in Chittenango Falls, NY. Three studies are currently underway. First, a mark-release-recapture study has been implemented to gain an estimate of the COAS population. Second, a competition experiment, pitting the COAS against the exotic Succinea sp.B, has been implemented to determine whether a competitive relationship exists between these species. Thus far, preliminary data suggest competition may in fact be a limiting factor for COAS. Finally, a habitat use survey has been implemented to determine how COAS utilize and interact with their environment.
Chittenango falls COAS study

7/29/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Avian Injury Study Plan for Year 3 (2008):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released the Final Study Plan for Year 3 (2008) of an Avian Injury Study. This study is part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) being conducted by the Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees -- New York State, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Department of Commerce. The Final Avian Injury Study Plan for 2008 entails work on tree swallows, American kestrels, Eastern bluebirds, and Eastern screech owls. A Draft Avian Injury Study Plan, dated March 17, 2008, was released earlier this year by the Trustees for public review and comment, in accordance with the Hudson River NRDA Plan. All comments received on the Draft Avian Injury Study Plan have been considered by the Trustees in preparing this Final Avian Injury Study Plan. A Responsiveness Summary, noting public comments and the Trustees’ response to those comments, will be provided by the Trustees in the near future. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Final Avian Injury Study Plan for 2008 and other documents for the Hudson River NRDA: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/HudsonRiver.cfm.

7/21/08 Madison County Wetland Restoration Success (Partners for Fish & Wildlife):

Among many other projects this summer, biologists Eric Rozowski and Steve Stroka completed a wetland restoration project in Madison County, New York.  This project was constructed by the biologists utilizing Service owned heavy equipment that is stationed at the New York Field Office.  The project site is located adjacent to lands owned and managed by the Great Swamp Conservancy and will contribute to the wetland habitat diversity in the area.  A multitude of wetland‑dependent wildlife is expected to benefit from this project.  Immediately after construction, several species of frogs and an American woodcock were witnessed at the site.

7/15/08 Monitoring Cornell Creek Restoration Project (Partners for Fish & Wildlife):

Partners for Fish & Wildlife (PFW) State Coordinator Schwartz is working with the Corps of Engineers-Buffalo District and the Town of Afton on an erosion protection project on a trout stream, Cornell Creek. The creek flows directly into the Susquehanna River just south of Afton, New York. Damage from the April 2006 500-year storm includes severe erosion of the stream banks, and most seriously, deposition of a deep bedload of small to moderate-sized rocks, boulders, sand, and silt. All fish habitat has been destroyed down to a point where ground water springs reestablish flows. Intern Jake Bengeyfield and STEP Student Kristen Randall accompanied Laury Zicari on a reconnaissance mission to record the present stream condition and to assist the PFW program in eventually measuring the project’s benefits to fish and wildlife.

7/14/08 Brewster Well Field Superfund Site (Environmental Contaminants):

Signed draft here (pdf)

6/17/08 Hudson River Trustees Responsiveness Summary for Avian Injury Study Amendment for 2007 (Environmental Contaminants):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a "Responsiveness Summary" for the Study Plan for an Avian Injury Study, Avian Egg Injection Study - Amendment for Year 2 (2007). The Trustees are working cooperatively to conduct a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) for the Hudson River. This Responsiveness Summary provides Trustee agency responses to public comments on and questions about the Trustees’ Study Plan for Avian Injury Study - Amendment for Year 2 (2007), Draft for Public Review and Comment, dated February 28, 2007, released by the Trustees for public review and comment. A Final Study Plan for Year 2 (2007), dated June 1, 2007, was subsequently released by the Trustees. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Responsiveness Summary and other documents for the Hudson River NRDA: http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/HudsonRiver.cfm.

6/9/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Data Report and Fact Sheet for 2003 Amphibian Preliminary Investigation (Environmental Contaminants)

bullfrog in the mudThe Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a Data Report and Fact Sheet for the preliminary investigation of bullfrog tadpoles and sediment samples conducted in 2003. This preliminary investigation is part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment being conducted by the Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees -- New York State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Department of the Interior. This preliminary investigation confirms that Hudson River amphibians are exposed to PCBs. The Trustees are evaluating the possible effect these PCBs may have on amphibian health, and considering the need for future injury determination studies on amphibians. Please visit the following website for a copy of the Data Report and Fact Sheet on the 2003 amphibian preliminary investigation:
http://www.fws.gov/contaminants/restorationplans/HudsonRiver/HudsonRiver.cfm.
Other documents for the Hudson River NRDA are also available at the above web site.

6/2/08 Long Island Field Office Partners with Beach Community to Improve Waterbird Breeding Productivity:Plover shelter

On May 23, 2008, the Long Island Field Office installed 18 chick shelters at the Breezy Point Cooperative within waterbird breeding areas located along the Atlantic Ocean beachfront. The shelters, consisting of 16-24 inch lengths of PVC pipe, were placed in breeding areas in hopes that unfledged piping plover and/or least and common tern chicks, will use them as refuge from gull predation, a major limiting factor in breeding productivity.

 

 

5/29/08 New Hydrokinetic Turbines Proposed on Niagara and St. Lawrence Rivers (Federal Activities):

Strawberry  Island on the Niagara RiverFour hydrokinetic projects have been proposed on the Niagara and St. Lawrence Rivers.  The three Niagara projects consist of 875 20-KW turbines (6 feet in diameter) to be located above the falls, and 54 1.3-MW and 36 2‑MW turbines (30 feet in diameter) to be located below the falls, for a total of 157.5 MW.  Resources of concern include migratory birds (a globally important bird area), American eel, lake sturgeon, Chinook salmon, Atlantic salmon, and steelhead.  The St. Lawrence Project consists of 110 1-MW turbines (size to be determined) for a total of 110 MW.  Lake sturgeon, American eel, and migratory birds are important resources on the St. Lawrence River. 

 

 

5/19/08 Upper Susquehanna Dam Removal & Mitigation Study Released! (Federal Activities):

"A Strategy for Removing or Mitigating Dams in New York State and Lessons Learned in the Upper Susquehanna Watershed" by Anne L. Secord:

Dam Report (pdf)

Appendix A: Dam Mitigation Field Sheet (doc)

Appendix B: Blank Dam Site Assessment (doc)

Appendix C: Summary of NYRU Report (pdf)

Appendix D: Dam Mitigation Funding Sources (pdf)

Appendix E: Dam Mitigation Reference List (pdf)

5/12/08 New Survey Protocols for Karner Blue Butterflies and Frosted Elfins (Endangered species):

Survey Protocols for Karner Blue Butterflies and Frosted Elfins (pdf) Please note: the Service is aware that these protocols are being released during the frosted elfin flight period and just prior to the first flight for Karner blue butterflies. Please contact the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and/or Service for any modifications to the survey requirements for 2008.

5/12/08 Three NYFO Poster Presentations displayed this week (Environmental contaminants, Endangered species):

Two posters regarding the Hudson River NRDA were presented at FWS' 11th Annual National Environmental Contaminants Training in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, held May 12-15, 2008: “Hudson River NRDA – Avian Injury Assessment,” and "Hudson River NRDA – Peer Review and Information Quality.

An additional poster is being presented as well, entitled "What's killing bats in the Northeastern United States: White-nose Syndrome and the potential role of environmental contaminants".

5/1/08 Whitenose Syndrome Powerpoint Briefing (Endangered Species):

Available here in powerpoint format (5 MB download)

4/21/08 Oswegatchie Relicensing Underway (Fish & Wildlife Conservation):

Oswegatchie River The New York Field Office reviewed the PAD for the Oswegatchie River Project. Key issues will be fish protection and downstream passage for a variety of species, upstream passage for American eel, flows in bypassed reaches, and impoundment fluctuations. Several pertinent studies have been requested.

4/7/08 Phoneix Project Update (Fish & Wildlife Conservation):

Phoenix project photoThe New York Field Office and the Regional Engineer discussed eel passage plans with Algonquin Power for the Phoenix Project on the Oswego River.

Algonquin will be employing an eel trap and manually transferring any eels that are captured. Due to low eel populations and several dams downstream, the run of eels is expected to be relatively small.

 

 

 

 

4/2/08 Federal Advisory Committee Presentation on Wind Power (Fish & Wildlife Conservation):

Please see this new presentation on the wind power page!

4/1/08 LIFO, Corps, and NYSDEC Protect Important Endangered Species Habitat (Endangered Species):

Fencing on Long Island beachThe Long Island Field Office (LIFO), in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), protected breeding habitat for the Federally- and New York State-listed piping plover and State-listed least tern in the Corps’ Westhampton Interim Project Area.  This is a yearly effort undertaken as part of the Service’s, Corps’, and NYSDEC’s obligations under a Federal Court Consent Decree.  In 2007, 21 pairs of piping plovers bred at this site, which spans 1.5 miles.  Management is a particularly complex issue at this site due to the Consent Decree, the Corps’ Project, public and private land ownership patterns, and the extreme coastal redevelopment which has taken place here, with over 100 homes fronting endangered species’ habitat.

 

 

3/18/08 Hudson River Trustees Release Draft Study Plan for 2008 Avian Injury Study (Environmental Contaminants):

The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have released a Draft Study Plan for an Avian Injury Study for 2008 for public review and comment. This study is part of the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) being conducted by the Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees – New York State, the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the U.S. Department of the Interior . For a copy of the Draft Study Plan please click here. The Trustees are interested in receiving feedback from the public on this Draft Study Plan, and are thus issuing this Draft Study Plan for public review and comment, in accordance with the Hudson River NRDA Plan. Comments should be submitted by April 19, 2008. Please provide any comments you may have to the contact and address listed in the pdf file: Avian Injury Study Year 3 Trustees Draft

3/11/08 Latest Information on White Nose Syndrome in Bats (Endangered Species):

Region 5 Article

PBS Online News-hour Article

2/27/08 Love Canal Restoration Property Acquisition (Federal Projects):

DeAngelis Property, N. Tanawanda PreserveThanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other natural resource trustees, the Buffalo Chapter of the National Audubon Society acquired another property at the North Tonawanda Nature Preserve. Using natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) funds from the Love Canal NRDA settlement, they purchased the 3.2‑acre DeAngelis property, a forested wetland threatened by development.  This urban nature preserve now includes about 40 acres of forested wetland that will remain a haven for wildlife and a site for connecting people with nature. 

 

 

 

2/19/08 Connecting People with Nature Series - Bald Eagle Recovery Exhibit:

eagle photoNYFO delivered the bald eagle display to Lime Hollow Center for Environment and Culture on February 14, 2008.  The exhibit is entitled, “Bald Eagles on the Road to Recovery” and celebrates not only the Federal delisting of the bald eagle, but the exemplary work by New York State biologists (Mike Allen and Peter Nye) who have spent many years working to increase bald eagle populations in New York from 1 breeding pair in 1979 to approximately 110 in 2007! 

This is the third display that NYFO has completed for Lime Hollow, the first being the Rachel Carson Centennial display; the second being the Indiana bat exhibit which will be displayed in the Regional Office the week of March 24th.  Two more collaborative exhibits are planned for 2008. 

 

 

 

2/5/08 Cayuga Creek Restoration (Federal Projects):

The New York Field Office has been working with the City of Niagara Falls, State of New York, Buffalo/Niagara Riverkeeper, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Niagara County Soil and Water Conservation District, Tuscarora Nation, Buffalo State College, and others to develop restoration projects on Cayuga Creek. This creek was contaminated by chemicals from the Love Canal Superfund Site and $220,000 in settlement funds from the responsible parties is to be used for one or more restoration projects. The restoration planning group met to discuss potential projects on January 18, 2008.

1/31/08 Bat Die-off Prompts Investigation (Endangered Species):

For information on " white nose syndrome" please visit the following websites:

USFWS Northeast Region Website

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

1/31/08 PCB's in Hudson River Bats (Environmental Contaminants):

The work of the Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees assessing PCB levels in bats was featured in an article published in the Schenectady Daily Gazette on January 30, 2008.  The Trustees had released a Work Summary/Data Report and a Fact Sheet for that investigation in December 2007.  The article is entitled, “Bats show elevated levels of PCBs - Study seeks to assess damage done to natural resources from chemicals” (pdf)

1/28/08 Public Outreach Project Celebrates Bald Eagle Recovery in New York (Endangered Species):

Biologist Sandie Doran is working with high school seniors from a Cayuga County Environmental Science Class and Mike Allen, a wildlife biologist from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), on a bald eagle educational outreach project that will be displayed at the Lime Hollow Nature Center from February‑April.  NYFO staff are building the display framework, offering their own personal artwork and making posters for the display. The display includes a less than life‑sized nest placed on top of a piece of plywood painted with a landscape view from the nest.  The students’ next project is to paint the lateral view from the nest on a 4 x 8 ft canvas, make a paper mache life‑size eagle to show the wingspan, and provide educational information for the display.

1/17/08 Cayuga County winter restoration (Partners for Fish & Wildlife):

Partners Biologist Gian Dodici wrapped up restoration work on a 30‑acre wetland project on private lands in Cayuga County, New York.  The restored palustrine emergent wetland habitat will benefit migratory birds, reptiles, and amphibians, as well as Federally‑ and State‑listed threatened and endangered species.;The project site had been adversely impacted through past farming activities which have involved ditching in an attempt to drain tillable lands. 

Cayuga county restoration

1/7/08 Fish Enhancement, Mitigation and Research Fund Update:

Please see our FEMRF page.

 

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Last updated: June 9, 2014
All images by FWS unless otherwise noted.