Northeast Region
Conserving the Nature of America

Conserving the Nature of the Northeast


Connecticut
New Hampshire
Vermont
Delaware
New York
Virginia
Maine
New Jersey
West Virginia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Massachusetts
Rhode Island

Wendi Weber
Regional Director, Northeast Region

  Bald Eagle. Credit: Karen Laubenstein/USFWS

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Northeast Region encompasses 13 states from Maine to Virginia. About 70 million people, nearly a quarter of the nation’s population, live within this area where the Service’s nearly 1,000 employees work in the regional headquarters, field offices, national wildlife refuges or fish hatcheries. Many of these 132 facilities are open to visitors and can provide exciting opportunities for wildlife dependent education, recreation and interpretation.

Part of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Service conserves, protects, and enhances fish and wildlife and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations. Service biologists contribute to the health of our environment — and consequently our quality of life — by protecting and restoring important habitat, safeguarding endangered species, minimizing environmental contamination, and restoring fish populations. In addition, the Service provides funds to support state fish and wildlife programs and enforces federal laws protecting wildlife. The headquarters for the Northeast Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is in Hadley, Massachusetts.

Northeast Region Facts (pdf)

The Northeast Regional Office

Regional Office Art Gallery Information

The Work We Do

Did You Know?

  • 82 million Americans spend $108 billion each year on hunting, fishing, birdwatching, and other wildlife-related recreation, supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs.
  • Of this $108 billion, nearly 38 million hunters and anglers spend more than $50 billion on equipment and nearly $20 billion on fuel, lodging, transportation, and other recreational expenses.
  • Nearly 22 million Americans travel more than a mile from home for wildlife watching activities.

Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s “2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation”

   
Painted trillium. Credit: Dr. Thomas G. Barnes/USFWS  

 

Would you like to help?

The Service welcomes the work of volunteers. Activities include habitat enhancement, visitor center staffing, stocking and spawning fish and administrative assistance.

Contact the volunteer coordinator at the Northeast Regional Office for more information about the volunteer program or contact a Service office, refuge or hatchery in your area.

 


Last updated: August 14, 2014