Law Enforcement
Northeast Region

Central District - New Jersey and Pennsylvania

About Us

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Central District Office of Law Enforcement is located in the Elizabeth, N.J., seaport, 15 miles west of New York City, six miles south of downtown Newark, N.J., and 83 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Penn. The Elizabeth office is comprised of Special Agents, Wildlife Inspectors, the Resident Agent in Charge, and a legal support staff. The inspection program at the port (commonly known as Port Newark) oversees the clearance of all wildlife imports/exports and encompasses 122 square miles and spans three states: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and parts of New York. Wildlife Inspectors are responsible for monitoring wildlife traveling via passenger and air cargo flights at Newark Liberty International Airport, United States Postal Service international mail facilities, express carriers such as FedEx and UPS, as well as all ocean cargo moving through the Port of New York/New Jersey. Special Agents in Elizabeth target the illegal commercialization and trafficking of both foreign and domestic species of protected wildlife, and investigate threats to native populations of wildlife and their habitats.

Commercial importers and exporters may submit documents to this email address: fwsole_newark@fws.gov

As the second busiest seaport in the nation, the Port of New York and New Jersey processed 88,907 tons of cargo worth more than $190 billion in 2008. This same year the total number of ocean containers being loaded and unloaded for import/export reached 5.3 million. Right next door, Newark Liberty International Airport serves more than 70 air carriers making over 1,200 daily flights. By the close of 2009, 781,000 tons of freight and 96,000 tons of mail will be shipped through Newark Liberty International Airport. Upwards of 33.7 million passengers will transit through Newark Liberty International Airport on 423,161 flights. Approximately 21 percent of these flights will be international.

The wildlife commodities most commonly imported through Elizabeth, N.J., are shell products, live animals (crustaceans and tropical fish), skins, traditional Chinese medicines, decorative fur trims, as well as shoes, watch straps and handbags made from exotic reptile leather. Top export commodities include white-tailed deer skins, captive bred furs, reptile skins, biomedical research samples, and live eels.

For further information or to report a violation, contact the Elizabeth, N.J., Office of Law Enforcement by phone or email.

News in the Central District Resident Agent in Charge

Carmine G. Sabia

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Office of Law Enforcement
1st floor; 1210 Corbin Street
Elizabeth, NJ 07201-2951

Phone: 908-787-1321
Fax: 908-787-1334

This office oversees the following Field Offices:

New Jersey Pennsylvania
Millville, N.J. Harrisburg, Penn.
  Philadelphia, Penn.

Links

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection http://www.state.nj.us/dep
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/index.htm
New York Department of Environmental Conservation http://www.dec.ny.gov/
Customs and Border Protection, Service - Port N.Y./Newark http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/contacts/ports/nj/4601.xml
USDA, APHIS import/export information
for animals and animal products
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/
NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/ole/ne_northeast.html
Department of Management Authority http://www.fws.gov/international/DMA_DSA/DMA_home.htm
APHIS/USDA New Jersey Veterinary Services Office http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/area_offices/states/newjersey_info.html
N.J. Animal Control http://www.aaanimalcontrol.com/Professional-TRAPPER/state/New-Jersey.htm
Newark Airport http://www.panynj.gov/airports/newark-liberty.html
N.Y./N.J. Seaport
NJFWS, licensed wildlife rehabilitators of N.J.,
lists by both species and counties
http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/rehablst.htm

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Last updated: May 23, 2012