Northeast Region
Conserving the Nature of America
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The Whalebone Cove Division of the refuge was established in August 2013 after a 40-acre donation from The Nature Conservancy. Credit: David Gumbart/The Nature Conservancy

50 acres added to Whalebone Cove Division of Conte Refuge

Nearly 50 acres in Lyme, Conn., will become part of the Whalebone Cove Division of the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, thanks to collaboration of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and The Nature Conservancy. The conserved parcel almost doubles the total acreage of the division, bringing it up to 116 acres. The Nature Conservancy originally purchased this property in 1999 as an addition to its Whalebone Cove Preserve. The Conservancy transferred the property to the Service, who acquired the parcel through the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which for 50 years, has provided money to federal, state and local governments to purchase land, water and wetlands. Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve native plants, animals and their habitats in the 7.2 million acre Connecticut River watershed that stretches across four states. It is the only refuge in the country dedicated to a river’s entire watershed.

Press release
Learn more about the LWCF
Learn more about the Conte Refuge


The acquisition will benefit many migratory bird species. Credit: USFWS

Service adds 190 acres to Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

Residents and visitors to upstate New York now have greater opportunities to experience wildlife in its natural habitat, thanks to the recent addition of more than 190 acres to Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. The newly-added acreage includes a variety of habitat, such as seasonal streams, wet woodlands, wooded hillsides, small fields and one small pond. The acquisition is funded by the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which provides money to federal, state and local governments to purchase land, water and wetlands. September 3 marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the LWCF. Lands purchased through the fund are used to provide recreational opportunities, protect clean water, preserve wildlife habitat, enhance scenic vistas, protect archaeological and historical sites and maintain the nature of wilderness areas.

News release
Learn more about the LWCF
Learn more about Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge


Hurricane Sandy aerial tour 2014 over Forsythe Refuge. The salt marsh system is an important storm protection for the many coast communities along the New Jersey shore.
Hurricane Sandy aerial tour over Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. The salt marsh system is an important storm protection for the many coast communities along the New Jersey shore. Credit: Lia McLaughlin/USFWS

Blog series: Hurricane Sandy aerial tour

Follow Rick Bennett, Regional Scientist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region, as he flies with a team over some of the Atlantic Coast locations from New York to Virginia that were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Each day, Bennett will be sharing observations of the sites and projects on the ground funded by the Department of the Interior through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, and how the Service is working to ensure the coastline and surrounding communities are #StrongAfterSandy.

Blog Series
More on Hurricane Sandy projects led by the Service


Piping plover
Piping plovers return to the Northeast in the spring to breed and raise their families over the summer. Credit: Kaiti Titherington/USFWS

Conserving piping plovers on the shores of Massachusetts

Thanks to the efforts of the states, municipalities, Audubon and other partners--and the help of beachgoers--we're wrapping up another breeding season for threatened piping plovers in the Northeast. Check out this video to see how some of our Massachusetts partners protect this rare shorebird. Due to their dedication and that of others, the plover population has come a long way since the shorebird was protected under the Endangered Species Act, from around 140 pairs when it was listed in 1986 to more than 650 pairs in 2013.

Video
Learn more about piping plovers on the Atlantic Coast


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Last updated: August 27, 2014