Northeast Fishery Center
Northeast Region
 

Recent Fish Technology Center Projects

Evaluation of Calcein as a Chemical Marking Agent for Lake Herring Coregonus artedi and Bloater Coregonus hoyi

Stream Bottom Habitat Mapping of the Allegheny River, NY

Participation in the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC)

Atlantic Sturgeon Culture

Hellbender Research

 

Evaluation of Calcein as a Chemical Marking Agent for Lake Herring Coregonus artedi and Bloater Coregonus hoyi

Calcein Marked Otolith

Image of the transverse section of a Lake Herring otolith depicting two calcein marks. (Photo Credit: USFWS - NEFC)

 

With funding from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the US Geological Service’s Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science, part of the Great Lakes Science Center, has initiated a captive culture program as a tool for the restoration of Lake Herring and Bloater in Lake Ontario. An important consideration in any fish stock restoration project is the discernment between wild and hatchery-reared fish. As a result, staff from the NEFC is assisting with the chemical marking of these fish using Calcein: a non-antibiotic, fluorescent dye that becomes permanently incorporated in calcified tissue. Also, the NEFC has verified single and double calcein marking events of these fish through microscopic examination. Marked Lake Herring and Bloaters are scheduled to be stocked in Lake Ontario in late 2015.

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Stream Bottom Mapping of the Allegheny River, NY

Center pass of raw sonar imagery from the Allegheny River near Salamanca, NY depicting large woody debris and a boulder field. (Photo Credit: USFWS - NEFC)

 

Biologists from the NEFC have started a research project using sonar technology to map 40 miles of in-stream habitat in the Allegheny River, beginning at the Oswayo Creek convergence and ending near Kinzua Reservoir. Project funding is provided by the Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership and partners include the N.Y. State Department of Environmental Conservation and Seneca Nation of Indians, all of which focus conservation efforts on habitat for fish and other aquatic life. The final product can serve as a baseline for habitat composition changes throughout time and can assist resource manager decisions for critical habitat protection and priority species’ restoration and recovery.

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Participation in the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC)

Assessing a culvert

NEFC technician assessing a perched culvert on a Pennsylvania stream. (Photo Credit: USFWS - NEFC)

 

The North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC) is a network of individuals from universities, conservation organizations, and state and federal natural resource and transportation departments focused on improving aquatic connectivity across a thirteen-state region, from Maine to West Virginia. The NAACC has developed common protocols and training for assessing road-stream crossings (culverts and bridges) and developed a regional database for these field data. The information will be used to identify high priority bridges and culverts for upgrade and replacement. In 2015, the NEFC had a two-person NAACC team which conducted crossing assessments from August through November. Using the prioritized Pennsylvania HUC12 maps from the NAACC website, the NEFC crew completed 20 HUC12 areas and started 3 others. A total of 347 sites were surveyed and entered into the NAACC database.

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Atlantic Sturgeon Culture

Cultured Atlantic Sturgeon

Fish Tech Center biologist holding a juvenile Atlantic sturgeon cultured at the Northeas Fishery Center (Photo Credit: USFWS - NEFC)

 

The Lamar Fish Technology Center provides captive refugia for the endangered Atlantic sturgeon, contributing to the understanding of the onset of reproductive development in captive sturgeon and serving as a source of propagation if needed for recovery purposes.

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Hellbender Research

Phot of an eastern hellbender (Photo Credit: Amber Pitt, Bloomsburg State University)

Eastern hellbender populations within New York and Pennsylvania waters have declined, and the species is currently listed as "vulnerable" in Pennsylvania. Via a captive population of hellbenders, FTC will research how selective environmental mechanisms affect this species, evaluate reproduction, refine captive culture techniques, assess impacts from invasive species, and other parameters that would be useful to Eastern hellbender conservation.

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Last updated: December 16, 2015
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