Ecological Services
Northeast Region
  • 1 Mink eat small mammals and fish contaminated with PCBs. This persistent chemical builds
    up in their bodies. PCB levels in Hudson River mink are high enough to affect the reproductive success of these animals.
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  • 3 Fish Consumption Advisories alert the public to avoid exposure to these contaminated natural resources.
  • 2 Restoration of the Hudson River may include improvements to shoreline habitat, replacing rocky shores with woody debris.
  • More Resources

    Hudson River Natural Resources

    Injuries and Effects of PCBs

    Restoring our Resources

    FAQ/Correcting Misinformation

    Important Documents

    Submit a Restoration Preposal

    Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment For More Information

    This case addresses natural resource injuries that have occurred due to the release of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the Hudson River, primarily from General Electric's Hudson Falls and Fort Edward, New York, manufacturing plants.

    Federal and state trustee agencies are studying the effects of the PCB contamination in the Hudson River through a process known as Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA).

     

    Preliminary Assessment - After a hazardous substance is released, Trustees determine whether natural resources have been injured. If injuries and restoration options exist, trustees proceed to the next phase. The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees completed their Preliminary Assessment in 2002 and moved forward with an NRDA investigation.

    Preliminary Assessment

    After a hazardous substance is released, Trustees determine whether natural resources have been injured. If injuries and restoration options exist, trustees proceed to the next phase. The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees completed their Preliminary Assessment in 2002 and moved forward with an NRDA investigation.
    Injury Assessment/ Restoration Planning - Trustees measure injuries to natural resources, and use that information to determine the best restoration actions. Injury Assessment: Trustees released the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment Plan in 2002, which was the first step in beginning the injury assessment. This assessment is ongoing. Restoration Planning: Trustees are developing a plan for restoring the injured natural resources and services. They continue to accept project proposals from the public and look forward to releasing a draft restoration plan for public comment.

    Injury Assessment/ Restoration Planning

    Trustees measure injuries to natural resources, and use that information to determine the best restoration actions.

     

    Injury Assessment: Trustees released the Hudson River Natural Resource Damage Assessment Plan in 2002, which was the first step in beginning the injury assessment. This assessment is ongoing.

     

    Restoration Planning: Trustees are developing a plan for restoring the injured natural resources and services. They continue to accept project proposals from the public and look forward to releasing a draft restoration plan for public comment.
    Restoration Implementation - Trustees, often working with those responsible for the release and interested citizens, implement restoration plans. 
Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees will begin restoration implementation after funds from General Electric are awarded for their NRDA claim. NRDA restores natural resources with funding from those responsible for the harm- making sure thehpolluter pays for injuries to public natural resources.

    Restoration Implementation

    Trustees, often working with those responsible for the release and interested citizens, implement restoration plans.

     

    Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees will begin restoration implementation after funds from General Electric are awarded for their NRDA claim.

     

    NRDA restores natural resources with funding from those responsible for the harm- making sure the polluter pays for injuries to public natural resources.

     

    Current Phase and Next Steps

    The Hudson River trustees are currently in the Injury Assessment/Restoration Planning phase of the Hudson River damage assessment. This phase can take many years.

    Restoration Implementation can begin after GE awards monetary damages to the Trustees.

    Learn more about our restoration planning process here.

    The Hudson River Natural Resource Trustees have established a listserv to provide updates on the ongoing natural resource damage assessment and restoration efforts for the Hudson River. The public is invited to join the listserv for periodic updates on this effort.

    To join the Hudson-NRDA listserv:

    1. Send a message to:
    requests@willamette.nos.noaa.gov

    2. Write in the subject:
    Subscribe hudsonnrda

    3. You will receive a confirmation e-mail to which you MUST reply within 24 hours.


    CONTACT HUDSON RIVER TRUSTEES

    Kathryn Jahn
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    3817 Luker Road
    Cortland, NY 13045
    607-753-9334
    Kathryn_Jahn@fws.gov

    Tom Brosnan
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    1305 East West Highway SSMC4, Room 10219
    Silver Spring, MD 20910
    301-713-3038 x186
    Tom.Brosnan@noaa.gov

    Sean Madden
    New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
    625 Broadway, 5th Floor
    Albany, NY 12233
    518-402-8977
    ssmadden@gw.dec.state.ny.us


    Last updated: May 18, 2012