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5 Fun Facts about White-Lipped Peccaries

White Lipped PeccaryCredit: Ana Cotta / cc license

logoThis week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

1. You’re probably already wondering… do white-lipped peccaries have white lips? Well, kind of. Their pig-like bodies and coats are mostly brown and black, but the distinctive white fur underneath their snouts and mouths is the reason for their name.

White Lipped PeccaryCredit: Melvin Merida / WCS Guatemala

2. Talk about being pros in group dynamics: White-lipped pecarries live in herds of 20-300 individuals. Some herds of even 2,000 individuals have been estimated!

White Lipped PeccaryCredit: Tuftedear / cc license

3. As omnivores, white-lipped peccaries will eat almost everything, but mostly eat fruit.

White Lipped PeccaryA camera trap view of a peccary herd. Photo Credit: Smithsonian National Zoo / cc license

4. They are the “canary in the gold mine” for tropical forests. White-lipped peccaries travel over a large range of land to find food and fresh fruits because they have so many herd members. When there are breaks in their habitat this can make them easy targets for both human hunters and wild hunters, like jaguars. In some countries the continued loss of habitat has made them a highly threatened species and their need for a large amount of space to forage make them a good indicator species for forest health. In Central American countries including El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, populations have already become locally extinct, or are now critically endangered. This is a good example why our efforts to protect the largest wild areas remaining in Central America are so important.

White Lipped PeccaryPhoto Credit: Chrumps / cc license

5. So on the more positive side, white-lipped peccaries have a lot of methods that they use to stay in groups and receive the safety benefits that being in a herd provides. They clatter their teeth and grunt when moving to stay aware of where other members of their herd are located. They also have powerful scents that can help the group stay together. Their noises and smells often provide a forecast that a herd is nearby, and the combined sensory experience can sometimes stretch the length of nearly two football fields. There are a good number of videos like this one and this one that demonstrate what white-lipped peccary encounters can be like.

Story by Levi Novey, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America Week, please click here. 

Protecting Central America’s Five Largest Wild Places: Indio Maíz-Tortuguero

TortugueroNationalPark_CostaRicaTortuguero National Park in Costa Rica is part of the Indio-Maiz corridor. Credit: Global WaterForum / cc license

This week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

Indio Maíz-Tortuguero is a critical stronghold for wildlife within the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. This Delaware-sized group of reserves and indigenous territories includes some of the most pristine forest remaining in Nicaragua, and Costa Rica’s Tortuguero National Park. The Indio Maíz -Tortuguero forest landscape contains a mosaic of upland forests, swamps, mangroves and beaches famous for their sea turtle nesting sites.  

The Indio-Maíz Biosphere Reserve in Southeastern Nicaragua is one of the two remaining core areas for Baird’s tapirs (Tapirus bairdii) and jaguars (Panthera onca) in the country. Globally, it is one of the three most important habitats for tapirs. The Baird’s tapir is the largest land mammal in Central and South America, and because of habitat loss, hunting and its low reproductive rate, it is now considered an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

tapirA Baird's Tapir gets its ears cleaned. Credit: Emmanuel Rondeau 

This landscape is also key habitat for many other rare animal and plant species including harpy eagles (Harpia harpyja), giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), great green macaws (Ara ambiguous) and wild almond trees (Dipteryx panamensis)

anteaterA tamandua hangs out. Credit: Emmanuel Rondeau 

These species are threatened by habitat degradation from encroachment by cattle ranchers and widespread poaching.  Nationally, more than 75,000 hectares of forest (185,328 acres) are being illegally cleared every year, mostly in Nicaragua’s two Biosphere reserves, Bosawas and Indio-Maíz. For comparison, the amount of area being deforested is larger in size than well-known U.S. cities like Denver, Chicago, New Orleans and Philadelphia. Without action, Indio-Maíz could disappear within a decade. 

Species Spotlight: Read 5 Fun Facts about White-Lipped Peccaries

To prevent the landscape from being utterly destroyed, the Service is partnering with Global Wildlife Conservation. Working together we aim to reduce illegal cattle ranching and poaching in the Indio-Maíz Biosphere reserve. In addition, by working with local indigenous communities, the national Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment, and the Secretariat of Natural Resources, and other partners, we are developing and implementing a sustainable community-based forest ranger program to protect this ecologically pristine area well into the future.

Story by Brendan Tate, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America Week, please click here. 

 

 

Access to the Best Fishing in Central Idaho Just Got Easier

Silver  Creek
Silver Creek. Photo by Idaho Fish & Game

In Idaho’s high desert, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) in partnership with our Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (WSFR) worked closely with private landowners to secure permanent public access to fantastic fishing sites along Silver Creek, near Picabo, Idaho.

Silver Creek is renowned for its sizable rainbow and brown trout, which attract anglers from around the world. Birdwatchers, kayakers and photographers also find the landscape along the creek inviting.

WSFR yesterday distributed $1.1 billion to state wildlife agencies for similar projects or other critical state environmental conservation and recreation work. The funding derives from excise taxes paid by the hunting, shooting, boating and angling industries.

More about WSFR

Protecting Central America’s Five Largest Wild Places: Moskitia

ruins
A view of the Moskitia region by boat. Credit: New World Trips/cc license

This week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

Ecology and economy, two systems run by separate entities, the former by nature and the latter by money, often appear set against each other like a prey and its predator. But thanks to innovative thinking and long-term landscape conservation initiatives, this notion of nature losing to the needs of people is changing, and its new identity is sustainability.

Environmental sustainability looks at the necessity of natural resource extraction for the benefit of a growing global economy and human population and discovers methods that will prevent environmental degradation so that the land will continue to produce the goods and services we depend on for life, while remaining healthy. In other words, when we take care of the land, it takes care of us.

This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service funds projects in Central America that explore and initiate innovative, practical ways to assist the people of Central America in the stewardship of its natural resources for the benefit of wildlife and habitats, local communities and international global citizens.

For Central America Week, we are highlighting 5 of the largest remaining wild landscapes that we are working to protect in collaboration with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). One of these last wildernesses is the Moskitia, the largest protected area complex of tropical mountain moist forest north of the Amazon basin. It contains rainforest jungle, marshes, mangroves, savannas and a host of wildlife.

logoWithin its diverse ecosystems, biodiversity flourishes. The area boasts large populations of endangered species such as jaguar, giant anteater, harpy eagle, scarlet and military macaws, white-lipped peccary, spider and howler monkeys, giant anteater, Baird’s tapir and hundreds of migratory birds. Many of these indispensable species are known to only survive within these reserves and nowhere else in nature, giving it extraordinary scientific, cultural and intrinsic value.

Species Spotlight: 5 Fun Facts about Howler Monkeys

UNESCO has listed Rio Platano Biosphere Reserve of Honduras, part of Moskitia, as a World Heritage Site in Danger. The Moskitia landscape is threatened by deforestation driven by cattle ranching, oil plantations and other agricultural encroachment, with complex governance issues.

The Moskitia is also a melting pot of human culture and ancient civilizations inter-mingled between the reserves and parks. The area is home to several indigenous groups, including the Miskito, Garifuna Pech and Tawahka – each with their own unique languages, cultures and traditions.  It is a stunning example of wilderness and culture connecting and growing together. Imagine a food market, loud and brimming with chaos, colors and other worldly charm, right next to an untamed rainforest. The challenge is in assisting people to thrive by the reserves without having to illegally and unsustainably use the resources from protected areas.

For example, we focus on preventing illegal cattle ranching in protected areas like national parks and then work with ranchers around these protected areas to improve practices, including mitigating wildlife conflict and providing viable alternatives to dissuade them from illegal activities in the nature reserves.

We are also supporting efforts of the Honduran national protected areas agency to strengthen capacity for protected area governance in Rio Platano Biosphere Reserve in order to prevent illegal deforestation activities.

In Nicaragua, we supported an innovative and effective conservation template for the people living in Pearl Lagoon basin. There existed an equal emphasis on improving and protecting the natural resource base and on the development of sustainable economic activities. The project created a nexus between increased income and sustainable resource use by enabling local community members to derive an improved livelihood from their natural resources.

There is an undeniable beauty when land can flourish in such a way that people are nourished and provided for, and that is the hope for the Moskitia. We believe it is possible for the environment and economy to exhibit a mutually beneficial relationship. It is a lofty goal, but perhaps the most necessary of our time. It is our mission to find these ways and help each other to make it a lasting reality, for present and future generations.

Story by Betsy Painter, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America week, please click here.

5 Fun Facts about Howler Monkeys

howler monkeyCredit: Laura Danielle / cc license

logoThis week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

Howler monkeys are a distinct group of monkeys found throughout the Americas. In total there are 15 different species of them! Here are some fun facts about them:

howler monkeyCredit: Steve Hershey / cc license

1. Howler Monkeys are the loudest animal in the New World and their sound can travel for up to three miles of thick forest. Listen here!

howler monkeyCredit: Wade Tregaskis / cc license

2. The Black Howler Monkey is the largest monkey in Latin American rainforests. They can grow between two to four feet tall and can weigh up to 22 pounds.

howler monkeyCredit: Roberto González / cc license

3. Unlike Old World monkeys, howlers and other New World species have a prehensile tail. They can use this tail as an extra arm to grip or even hang from branches. 

howler monkeyCredit: Michael Klotz / cc license

4. Male howler monkeys have large throats and specialized, shell-like vocal chambers that help to turn up the volume on their distinctive call. The noise sends a clear message to other monkeys: Stay Out!

howler monkeyCredit: Steve Jurvetson / cc license

5. Some Howler Monkeys can live up to 20 years of age.

Story by Brendan Tate, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America week, please click here.

Protecting Central America’s Five Largest Wild Places: The Maya Forest

ruins
Yaxha Ruins in the Maya Forest of Guatemala. Credit: Christopher William Adach/cc license

This week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

Located within parts of Mexico, Guatemala and Belize, the Maya Forest is the single largest tract of forest in Central America. It is an area bigger in size than the state of Massachusetts and is only second in size in the Americas to the Amazon Rainforest. It is home to charismatic species like jaguars, monkeys, tree frogs, toucans and scarlet macaws.

People also live throughout the Maya Forest. The ruins left behind by the ancient Mayan civilization sit amid the lush, green rainforest. The rich past and the mysteries they invoke capture our imaginations when we think about this landscape. For other people, the Maya Forest and its human artifacts have provided an exciting backdrop for visions of the future in movies like Star Wars.

But, of course, in present day, people continue to influence the landscape and live here. Many of those who live nearby are impoverished, and the forest provides a bountiful means for them to get the resources they need to support their families. Many of these activities, including timber harvesting, hunting, mining, agriculture, and illegal take of animals and plants for sale are destructive as currently conducted. They may ultimately lead to the demise of the Maya Forest and threaten numerous species of wildlife with local or globalized extinction, which in the long-term would only exacerbate the economic circumstances for people living in the forest.

Species Spotlight: 5 Cool Facts about Jaguars

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues to work with a variety of partners and communities in the Maya Forest to create the means and infrastructure to help conserve the Forest while also providing alternative means for people to earn income and take care of their families. Some of these projects involve helping park rangers get the tools they need to better enforce laws and educate the public about protected areas, and others involve providing a means for communities to develop alternative types of agricultural activities that are sustainable.

For instance, in Guatemala, where the nation manages its part of the forest as a system of parks and protected areas known as the “Maya Biosphere Reserve,” the Service is working with its partner, the Forest Communities of Petén Association (Asociación de Comunidades Forestales del Petén), to engage six women’s groups who live in the Reserve. The aim is to identify best practices for sustainably harvesting Maya nuts from the Ramon tree, and help the women and their families earn more money through this sustainable form of agriculture. Elsewhere in the Maya Forest, we are working in the Maya Mountains of Belize with Friends for Conservation and Development (FCD) to reduce the expansion of the agricultural frontier into Chiquibul National Park. In this case, FCD provides park rangers with the training and technology they need to conduct more effective patrols and enforce laws. A variety of additional projects funded by the Service attempt to accomplish similar objectives (e.g., developing sustainable livelihood pilot projects in hotspot border communities in Guatemala with Asociación Balam), while protecting charismatic species like jaguars and providing economic benefits for local communities.

It is ultimately through a variety of partnerships and strategies that the Maya Forest will be protected. But it will all start with people and awareness, just as most successful conservation initiatives have. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proud to be part of this effort!

By Levi Novey, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America week, please click here.

5 Cool Facts about Jaguars

jaguar
The jaguar is the largest cat in the Americas. Photo by Emmanuel Rondeau

logoThis week we are excited to feature a series of articles about some of the most important landscapes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helps to protect in Central America, that are home to an incredibly biodiverse array of wildlife. As part of “Central America Week,” we invite you to learn more about our cornerstone strategy with Wildlife Conservation Society to protect Central America’s five largest remaining wild places. We will also be spotlighting some of the charismatic species that live in these critical habitats. All of our Central America Week stories can be found here.

You may have heard that recently a jaguar named “El Jefe” (The Boss) was spotted in southern Arizona. While jaguars are now a rare sight in the United States, throughout the Americas, they are still the kings and queens of the jungle. Here are five cool facts about jaguars:

jaguar
A camera trap image of a jaguar. Photo by Emmanuel Rondeau

1. Did you know that the jaguar is the biggest wild cat in the Western Hemisphere? Of all cat species in the world, only lions and tigers are bigger. The next largest cat species in the Western Hemisphere is the cougar or mountain lion. Sorry bobcats and lynx, you need not apply.

jaguar
The jaguar throne at Chichen Itza.Photo by Paul Mannix / cc license

2. Jaguars have been revered by ancient cultures throughout the Americas, such as the Aztecs, Mayans and Moche. Ancient cities and buildings in these cultures often had statues, artwork and ceramics that featured jaguars prominently. For instance, in Mexico’s Chichen Itza Mayan archaeological site, a jaguar throne can still be seen.

jaguar
A jaguar swims. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

3. Have you ever seen a cat that liked to get wet? Jaguars are among the wild cats that like to swim! Some have even been observed swimming across the Panama Canal.

jaguar
Guatemalan ranchers in the Maya Forest pose with a roadside sign for the “Jaguares para Siempre” campaign. Photo by Wildlife Conservation Society Guatemala

4. It might come as little surprise that with the growth of human populations over time, the range of jaguars has decreased (yes, we know, not really a cool fact… but stick with us...) One of the reasons that jaguars have become threatened is because as their forest habitat and prey sources shrink they will often kill cows as they increasingly encounter cattle ranches. Losing even one individual cow can be a devastating economic blow to a rancher or family, and fair or not, people will sometimes shoot jaguars on sight.

For this reason, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and our partners are working with ranchers and communities throughout Central and South America to share jaguar-friendly ranching techniques that will help protect cattle, while allowing ranchers to peacefully co-exist with jaguars. In many places, now jaguars nearby are instead viewed as a source of community pride. This strategy has already yielded positive results at changing opinions and protecting jaguars forever.  (See, pretty cool.) Jaguares para siempre!

jaguar
Photo by Martin Pitchford / cc license

5. You must be getting hungry after all of this reading. So let’s talk about food! Jaguars are the apex predators throughout their habitats. One study indicated that they eat at least 86 species! They often kill their prey with a powerful bite to the skull. What a weird way to eat, right? Well guess what, they use this technique to eat reptiles like turtles and pierce through their shells. They even eat caiman, a type of crocodilian species! That’s where the swimming can come in handy too.

jaguar
A jaguar mom with her cubs in Bolivia. Credit: Daniel Alarcon


Keep on rocking jaguars!

By Levi Novey, International Affairs. For more stories from Central America week, please click here.

Women's History Month: Wild and Inspiring Females

In honor of Women’s History Month, we wanted to highlight wild women who have made a difference for conservation and elevated our understanding of the natural world. No, these are not women who party while they work; these wild women are actually wildlife. They may not be as inspring as, say, Rachel Carson (who is included below), but they have definitely had an impact. These females have made their mark on the history of wildlife conservation and continue to inspire action, research, education, science. Cheers to all the wild women who have made historic contributions. What wild woman has inspired you?

The Wildlife

Martha the Passenger Pigeon
Cincinnati Zoo, circa 1914

Martha
- The Last Passenger Pigeon
(~1885 – 1914) 

Martha was the last known living passenger pigeon. She was named "Martha" in honor of the first First Lady Martha Washington. Passenger pigeons have been extinct since her death, and her story continues to serve as a somber reminder of what can happen to a species. Her death increased awareness around wildlife conservation as a whole, and confronted the finality of extinction that inspired the passing of laws like the Endangered Species Act.

Wisdom incubating her egg (December 2014). Photo credit: Daniel W. Clark/USFWSDaniel W. Clark, USFWS

Wisdom - Oldest Wild Banded Bird
(1951?- Present)

Wisdom is a female Laysan Albatross and also holds the title for the oldest known wild bird. She was banded back in 1956 around the age of 5 years old. Impressively, Wisdom continues to lay eggs and recently hatched what may be her 36th chick. Her amazing story highlights the importance of long term monitoring and research studies. We can always learn something new and in the case of Wisdom, are witnessing her make history.


close up portrait of Harriet. Photo credit: Daniel W. Clark/USFWS
Photo by Cory Doctrow, Creative Commons 

Harriet - One of Darwin’s Tortoises
(1830 - 2006)

Harriet, the Giant Galápagos Land Tortoise was collected by Sir Charles Darwin before later being transported to Australia where she spent a majority of her life. At the time of her death in 2006, she was considered one of the earth's oldest living creatures. Harriet continues to be a point of fascination for many.  

Women at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
While the female wildlife trail-blazers above have certainly made history, here at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, we're also proud of the women who broke barriers for many of our staff. They pushed through the status-quo of the time and challenged us as an agency to be the best we could be. Here are just a few history-making women that we'd like to mention. 

Rachel Carson: Author and Movement Leader
portrait of Rachel Carson
Photo by Shirley Briggs

Rachel Carson (1907-1964): Through her words and her book, Silent Spring, Rachel Carson shaped the modern environmental movement. She spent 16 years working for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Her work as an educator, scientist and writer revolutionized America’s interest in environmental issues.

Mollie Beattie: First Female Director 
Mollie Beattie standing on a streambank in Alaska as a bear looks on from the far shore
Mollie Beattie (1947-1996): She was the first woman to become Director (1993-1996) of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Her passion for wildlife conservation remains an inspiration.  

Elizabeth "Betty" Losey: First Female Field Biologist
Elizabeth Losey smiles as she holds a wild duck
Elizabeth "Betty" Losey (1912-2005) She was hired in 1947 by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as the first female research biologist. Before her, it was not seen as suitable for a female to work and stay overnight in the field. 

Lucille F. Stickel: Inspiring Research Pioneer

portrait of Lucille F. Stickel
Lucille F. Stickel (1915 -2007) She was director of Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and pioneered research techniques that lead to a much deeper understanding of the impacts of pesticides in animals and the food web.



California's Newest Condor Wears a Basketball Jersey

You may have heard that the Los Angeles Clippers unveiled their new mascot Chuck the Condor at Monday’s game against the New York Nets, and while the reactions were mixed, we think Clippers' fans will learn to love condors as much as we do.

California condor #412 soars above the Los Padres National Forest

Like the Los Angeles Clippers, California condors were fighting a losing battle in the 1980s. Plagued with injuries to the team’s star players and poor performances, the Clippers finished their 1987 season at 12-70, the second worst single-season on record in NBA history.

Around the same time, California condors were being wiped out of their native range and killed off by lead poisoning, which weakens their immune system and leads to death with continued over exposure. The worldwide population of wild condors was down to only 23 in 1983 -- and by 1987, wildlife biologists were forced to bring in all remaining condors from the wild to prevent extinction. Watch the last condor capture on April 19, 1987.

In the 1990s and 2000s, the Clippers began to build a team that would ultimately rise to the top in the NBA. And so, too, began efforts to return soaring California condors to the skies of southern California.

The Clippers finished their 1991-1992 season with a record of 45-37, their best in 13 years. They even earned strong bragging rights against cross-town rivals, the Los Angeles Lakers, for beating their season record. That same year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began reintroducing California condors back into the wild, following the establishment of the multi-partner California Condor Recovery Program.

California Condor Released at Hopper Mountain NWR

By 2006, hard work and perseverance began to pay off for the Clippers, winning their first NBA playoff game in more than a decade. Just two years later in 2008, partners with the California Condor Recovery Program celebrated a milestone of their own with more California condors flying free in the wild than in captivity for the first time since the program began in 1992. Learn about the release of California condor #20, a 35-year old condor that played a pivotal role in recovery efforts.

Saving the California condor from extinction has not been an easy task, but much like Clippers fans, condor supporters have stuck by the program through thick and thin. Victories are not only a result of the key players, but also from a strong support system of many dedicated partners.

Today, the Los Angeles Clippers hold two consecutive division titles in the 2013 and 2014 seasons, and with hard work, talented players and a strong team of supporters, are looking forward to a bright future in the Western Conference.

And as for California condors and the biologists, veterinarians, volunteers, and supporters who work to recover them, we too see a bright future ahead. Today, as a result of the reintroduction program and ongoing management activities, there are 268 California condors in the wild. In the final phase of the recovery program, we’re working with our partners to build self-sustaining populations, educate the public about the threats impacting these birds in the wild, and tell their story of tragedy and triumph.

So basketball fans, we hope you share our pride in telling the story of the California condor, North America’s largest bird with a strong will to fight against all odds, and your new team mascot for the Los Angeles Clippers. We invite the Los Angeles Clippers to join our biologists for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see California condors in the wild. We promise the experience will be a real game changer. Learn more: http://www.fws.gov/cno/es/CalCondor/Condor.cfm

Why California Condors Dominate the Skies

The California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), with a wingspan of 9.5 feet and weighing up to 25 pounds, is the largest land bird in North America. California condors can soar on warm thermal updrafts for hours, reaching speeds of more than 55 miles per hour and altitudes of 15,000 feet. Flights in excess of 150 miles in a day have been recorded. These majestic creatures historically ranged from California to Florida and Western Canada to Northern Mexico. By the mid-20th century, condor populations had dropped dramatically, and by 1967 the California condor was listed as federally endangered.

California Condor Recovery is a Group Effort

California Condor Recovery Program partners include U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Game and Fish Department, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Utah Department of Fish and Wildlife, the federal government of Mexico, the Yurok Tribe, San Diego Zoo, Los Angeles Zoo, Oregon Zoo, Santa Barbara Zoo, Chapultepec Zoo, The Peregrine Fund, Ventana Wildlife Society, and a host of other governmental and non-governmental organizations.


--
Ashley Spratt, Public Affairs Officer

Horicon National Wildlife Refuge: Internationally Celebrated Wetland Turns 75

Horicon
Horicon Marsh. Photo by Ryan Hagerty/USFWS

 Visitor Services Manager Erin Railsback at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin tells us a bit about the history of 75-year-old Horicon, showing how local conservationists, our biologists and land managers can work together to bring back the land and waters of the Midwest.

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