Press Release
Service Withdraws Proposal to List Cook’s Petrel Under the Endangered Species Act

January 5, 2010

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced its intention to withdraw its 2007 proposal to protect the Cook’s petrel as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Based on a thorough review of the best available scientific information, including additional information received during the comment period on the proposal, the Service has concluded this species is not likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future.
The world population for Cook’s petrel is currently estimated to be approximately 1,300,000 individuals, with an increasing population trend due to predator eradication efforts. In addition, the Service found evidence of active support for the conservation of this species that has also contributed to its increasing numbers. The proposal was originally published in the December 17, 2007, Federal Register.
Petrels are tube-nosed seabirds having a fossil record that is estimated to extend back 60 million years. Birds of this species are exclusively pelagic – returning to land only to breed.
The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit /www.fws.gov.

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The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.