News Release

Okefenokee Swamp Featured on New Postage Stamp

June 1, 2007

Contact:

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/



The most recent addition to the Scenic American Landscapes postage stamp series featuring Okefenokee Swamp was unveiled today by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Deputy Director Randall Luthi at the NAPEX 2007 stamp exhibition underway in Northern Virginia.

This stamp depicts the still water, cypress trees and yellow cow-lilies of the Okefenokee Swamp, which occupies 438,000 acres -- approximately 650 square miles -- in southeastern Georgia and northeast Florida. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protects 402,000 acres of this swamp as the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge -- established in 1937 to preserve the swamp and protect its wildlife and wildlife habitat. The photograph on the stamp was taken by José Azel, from a canoe during an early-morning foray into the refuge. This new $.69 First Class Mail International stamp can be used for postage for letters between the U.S. and Mexico or Canada.

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The origin of the name Okefenokee is from the Choctaw Indian word for "Land of the Trembling (or Quivering) Earth," and refers to the many peat mounds -- or "blow-ups" -- found throughout the Okefenokee Swamp.

Over 400,000 people, from school children to senior citizens, come from all over the world to experience the swamps unique wilderness through boating, hiking, and canoeing. Visitors learn about early settlers, discover alligators and other wildlife, and simply enjoy the Okefenokee Swamp.

Through its support of the Federal Duck Stamp programs, the U.S. Postal Service is an important conservation partner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Sales of the Federal Duck Stamp have helped protect more than 5.2 million acres of wetlands for our National Wildlife Refuges.

The Postal Service is also an active partner in the Junior Duck Stamp program. Each year, more than 30,000 schoolchildren from Kindergarten through twelfth grade participate in the Junior Duck Stamp program. Through this unique program, kids learn not just about ducks -- but also learn about conservation, ecology, wetlands, waterfowl, and more.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving the nature of America. For more on the Service and its commitment to scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, cooperative conservation, and public service, visit /www.fws.gov

Information contained in older news items may be outdated. These materials are made available as historical archival information only. Individual contacts have been replaced with general External Affairs office information. No other updates have been made to the information and we do not guarantee current accuracy or completeness.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

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