News Release

Service Initiates Status Review of 58 Protected Species in California and Nevada

March 5, 2008

Contact:

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/



Service Seeks Latest Scientific Information on Species Health, Population TrendsĀ 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is requesting information as part of the status reviews of 58 protected species in California and Nevada. A list of 39 status reviews completed in 2007 and early 2008 is also included in todays Federal Register notice.

Required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the purpose of the reviews is to ensure that the listing of the species as threatened or endangered is accurate and based on the best scientific and commercial data available, and to determine whether the listing status should be considered for change. To accomplish this, the Service is requesting submission of any new information produced since the original listing of each of these 58 species by May 5, 2008.

Since 2005 the Service has initiated status reviews of 145 listed species in California and Nevada. To date, 51 reviews have been completed.

Under the ESA, the Service maintains a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plants. The Act requires that the Service conduct a review of listed species at least once every five years and determine whether or not any species should be removed from the list (delisted), or reclassified from endangered to threatened or from threatened to endangered. Delisting a species must be supported by the best scientific and commercial data available and only considered if such data substantiates that the species is neither endangered nor threatened for one or more of the following reasons:

-- The species is considered extinct.

-- The species is considered to be recovered.

-- The original data available when the species was listed, or the interpretation of such data, were in error. Any change in Federal classification requires a separate rule-making process distinct from the status review.

To ensure that the review is as thorough as possible, the Service is soliciting new information about these species from the public, concerned governmental agencies, Tribes, the scientific community, industry, environmental entities, and any other interested parties. The Federal Register notice indicates where comments should be sent for each species. It also lists the appropriate contact person for information on each species.

Categories of requested information include:

-- Species biology, including population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics.

-- Habitat conditions, including amount, distribution, and suitability.

-- Conservation measures that have been implemented that benefit the species.

-- Threat status and trends; and other new information, data, or corrections, including taxonomic or nomenclatural changes, identification of erroneous information, and improved analytical methods.

Threatened or endangered animal species in California to be reviewed are: the coastal California gnatcatcher, light-footed clapper rail, Quino checkerspot butterfly, San Bernardino kangaroo rat, San Clemente sage sparrow, Amargosa vole, arroyo (= arroyo southwestern) toad, Mount Hermon june beetle, Mohave tui chub, Owens pupfish, Owens tui chub, Santa Cruz long-toed salamander, unarmored three-spine stickleback, Zayante band-winged grasshopper, bay checkerspot butterfly, callippe silverspot butterfly, mission blue butterfly, Myrtles silverspot butterfly, San Bruno elfin butterfly, salt marsh harvest mouse, Shasta crayfish, and Point Arena Mountain beaver.

For Nevada they are: the Ash Meadows naucorid, Big Spring spinedace, Carson wandering skipper, desert tortoise (Mohave population), Pahranagat roundtail chub, and Ash Meadows milk-vetch.

Listed plants to be reviewed include: Cushenbury buckwheat, Cushenbury milk-vetch, Cushenbury oxytheca, Nevins barberry, Parishs daisy, Peirsons milk-vetch, San Bernardino Mountains bladderpod, San Diego thornmint, and triple-ribbed milk-vetch, coastal dunes milk-vetch, Conejo dudleya, Hickmans potentilla, marcescent dudleya, Santa Monica Mountains dudleya, and Veritys dudleya, Clara Hunts milk-vetch, clover lupine, fleshy owls-clover, Ione buckwheat (including Irish Hill), Ione manzanita, Kenwood Marsh checkermallow, large-flowered fiddleneck, Napa bluegrass, Pitkin Marsh lily, Tiburon jewelflower, Tiburon mariposa lily, Tiburon paintbrush, white sedge, Calistoga allocarya, and western lily.

Copies of completed 5-year reviews are also available on the California and Nevada Regions website.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

Information contained in older news items may be outdated. These materials are made available as historical archival information only. Individual contacts have been replaced with general External Affairs office information. No other updates have been made to the information and we do not guarantee current accuracy or completeness.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.