News Release

Critical Habitat Proposed for Southern California Population of Mountain Yellow-legged Frog

September 13, 2005

Contact:

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/



Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a proposed rule to designate approximately 8,283 acres of streams in portions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties as critical habitat for the federally endangered southern California population of mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa).

All of the areas proposed for critical habitat designation lie within the boundaries of the Angeles and San Bernardino National Forests. A small portion of the proposed areas ? 119 acres - are privately owned lands.

Proposed critical habitat includes portions of Bear Gulch, Vincent Gulch, and Alder Gulch along the east fork of the San Gabriel River; and portions of Little Rock Creek, Big Rock Creek, and Devil's Canyon along the West Fork of the San Gabriel River; portions of the East and West Forks of City Creek; and portions of Fuller Mill Creek, Dark Canyon, Black Mountain Creek, and the North Fork of the San Jacinto River.

Some of the areas proposed for critical habitat designation are not currently known to contain populations of the species. These areas, including City Creek, and the upper reaches of the North Fork of the Whitewater River are being proposed for designation because the Service determined they contain features essential to the conservation of the species.

"The southern California population of mountain yellow-legged frog is extremely limited," said Steve Thompson, Manager of the Service's California/Nevada Operations. "Some unoccupied areas are being proposed for designation because they are essential for the conservation of the species and will likely be focal points for recovery efforts ? this is especially true in the case of City Creek.?

Portions of Fuller Mill Creek, Dark Canyon, the North Fork of the San Jacinto River and Hall Canyon that fall within the boundaries of the Western Riverside County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan are being excluded from proposed critical habitat.

Mountain yellow-legged frogs are found in streams from southern California to high-elevation lakes in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Research conducted on the various populations of the species indicates that mountain yellow-legged frogs in southern California are distinctly different from those found in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. In 2002, the Service listed mountain yellow-legged frogs in southern California as an endangered distinct population segment of the species.

This proposed rule was prepared pursuant to a court order resulting from a lawsuit filed against the Service by the Center for Biological Diversity in 2004, challenging our failure to designate critical habitat for the southern California DPS of mountain yellow-legged frog at the time it was listed under the ESA. The Service is preparing a draft economic analysis of the proposed critical habitat that will be released for public review and comment at a later date.

The Service is requesting comments and information on the critical habitat proposal be submitted in writing to the Field Supervisor, Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office, 6010 Hidden Valley Road, Carlsbad, California 92011, or by facsimile to 760-431-9618. Comments may also be sent by electronic mail to fw1cfwo_mylfpch@fws.gov. Comments will be accepted until November 14, 2005. Written requests for a public hearing will be accepted until October 28, 2005.

In 30 years of implementing the ESA, the Service has found that designation of critical habitat provides little additional protection for most listed species, while preventing the agency from using scarce conservation resources for activities with greater conservation benefits.

In almost all cases, recovery of listed species will come through voluntary cooperative partnerships, not regulatory measures such as critical habitat. Habitat is also protected through cooperative measures under the ESA, including Habitat Conservation Plans, Safe Harbor Agreements, Candidate Conservation Agreements and state programs. In addition, voluntary partnership programs such as the Service's Private Stewardship Grants and the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program also restore habitat. Habitat for listed species is provided on many of the Service's National Wildlife Refuges, and state wildlife management areas.

A copy of the proposed rule and other information about the southern California population of mountain yellow-legged frog is available on the Internet at http://carlsbad.fws.gov, or by contacting the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office at 760-431-9440.

Information contained in older news items may be outdated. These materials are made available as historical archival information only. Individual contacts have been replaced with general External Affairs office information. No other updates have been made to the information and we do not guarantee current accuracy or completeness.


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