News Release

One of oldest bald eagles on record shot in West Virginia, Reward offered for information about shooting

January 22, 2013

Contacts:
Special Agent Bryce Findley at 304-636-6586, ext. 14. or Bryce_Findley@fws.gov

Federal and state officials are seeking assistance from the public with the investigation into the shooting of a bald eagle near Old Fields, W.V. The eagle was found shot in a hayfield the weekend prior to Thanksgiving and later died from its injuries.  Bald eagles are protected by both federal and state law.

A reward of up to $2,500 will be paid for information that leads to a conviction.

The female eagle had a leg band and was identified as a chick that was banded in Ontario in 1990. At 22 years old, she was one of the oldest bald eagles on record.

Special agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Natural Resources Police from the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Section are investigating the incident. Anyone with information should contact Captain Roy E. Cool at the Division of Natural Resources Office in Romney, W.V. at 304-822-3551 or Special Agent Bryce Findley at 304-636-6586, ext. 14.

Under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, a first offense violation carries a criminal penalty of up to $100,000 and/or one year in federal prison.

West Virginia law provides for fines of $500 to $5,000 and/or up to one-year imprisonment in the county jail. Under the W.V. state code, one half of any fine imposed shall be paid to the person or persons providing information that leads to the arrest and conviction of anyone violating the provisions of the section protecting eagles. State law also requires a $5,000 replacement cost for any person who is convicted of violating a criminal law of the state that results in the injury or death of a bald eagle. Second offenses under either the state or federal law can result in felony charges.


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