Bulletin
Endangered Species Act Turns 40 on December 28

December 20, 2013

Contacts:

Gavin Shire, USFWS, 703-346-9123, gavin_shire@fws.gov
Fionna Matheson, NOAA, 301-427-8013, fionna.matheson@noaa.gov


The recovery of the bald eagle owes its success to the Endangered species Act, which turns 40 on December 28.

The recovery of the bald eagle owes its success to the Endangered species Act, which turns 40 on December 28. Credit: George Gentry/USFWS
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The Endangered Species Act, the bipartisan legislation that is credited with saving hundreds of species from extinction, was signed into law by President Nixon 40 years ago on December 28, 1973.
 
This landmark law has been the catalyst for fully recovering 31 species, including the bald eagle, eastern population of Steller sea lion, American alligator, Lake Erie water snake and the Virginia northern flying squirrel. It continues to work today to protect and recover more than 2,100 animals and plants in the U.S. and around the world.
 
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have assembled a wide range of resources to enable media to celebrate this historic occasion, including:

    
NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels at www.noaa.gov/socialmedia.
 


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.