New England Field Office
Conserving the Nature of New England

Endangered Species Reviews/Consultations

 

Endangered Species Consultation
Project Review for Projects with Federal Involvement
(authorizing, funding or carrying out the project)

The following information is designed to assist applicants or project sponsors in determining whether a federally-listed, proposed and/or candidate species may occur within the proposed project area and whether it is appropriate to contact our office for additional coordination or consultation. We encourage you to print out all materials used in the analyses of effects on listed, proposed or candidate species for your records or submission to the appropriate federal agency or our office.

Step 1.
- Determine whether any listed, proposed, or candidate species (T/E species) are likely to occur within the proposed project action area based on location of the proposed project:

  1. Choose your state list below and review for Towns in which federally-listed species occur:

  2. Connecticut - 12 species (29 KB)
    Massachusetts - 14 species (41 KB)
    New Hampshire - 13 species (31 KB)
    Rhode Island - 8 species (22 KB)
    Vermont - 10 species (25 KB)

  3. You should contact your state Natural Heritage Program or Endangered Species Program (see list below) for additional information on federally and state-listed species:

  4. Rhode Island Natural Heritage Program
    Connecticut Endangered Species Program
    Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program
    Vermont Non-Game and Natural Heritage
    New Hampshire Fish and Game's Non-game and Endangered Wildlife Program
    New Hampshire Natural Heritage Bureau's Home Page

    Please note that these agencies provide information on known occurrences; this information does not replace field surveys, especially for plants, as most project sites have not been previously surveyed specifically for listed species.

  5. If the project falls within a Town where the endangered dwarf wedgemussel is known to occur, check the appropriate map to determine whether your project is in the vicinity of its known range.

    Massachusetts - Connecticut River Watershed (912 KB)
    New Hampshire/Vermont - Connecticut River Watershed
    Upper Connecticut River ( 872 KB)
    Middle Connecticut River (1.07 MB)
    Lower Connecticut River  (1.56 MB)
    New Hampshire - Ashuelot River Watershed (886 KB)
    Connecticut - Connecticut River Watershed (2.04 MB)

  6. If the project falls within a Town where the endangered northern red-bellied cooter is known to occur, or if the project occurs in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, check the map to determine whether your project is in the vicinity of its known range or critical habitat. NRBC_MAP (59 KB)

  7. If a proposed project occurs in a Town with no known listed, proposed or
    candidate species present, no further coordination with the Service is
    needed. You may download a "no species present" letter (158 KB) stating "no species are known to occur in the project area".

  8. If the proposed project occurs in a Town with known occurrences of T/E species, proceed to Step 2.
Step 2. - Determine whether any listed or proposed New England Species are likely to occur within the proposed project area by comparing the habitat present within the proposed project action area with habitat that is suitable for the species.
    1. Review the information we have provided on the species list information from the appropriate state agency, and any other sources of information available to you to determine types of habitat the species use. A description of suitable habitat for New England's federally-listed species may be found in New England Species' profiles and fact sheets.
    2. Determine whether your proposed project action area has any potential for listed species habitat (e.g., are suitable roost trees present? - Indiana bats; are wetlands present? - bog turtles or Northeastern bulrush; will project affect a waterway? – dwarf wedgemussel). After this initial coarse review, determine whether any more detailed surveys may be appropriate (e.g., survey for dwarf wedgemussels).
    3. If your state Natural Heritage Program or Endangered Species Program does not identify any listed species for the proposed project AND there is no potential habitat for any listed species within the action area, no further coordination with the Service is required. You may download a "no species present" letter (158 KB) stating "no species are known to occur in the project area".
    4. If you have identified that potential listed species habitat is present although the species has not been documented from that specific location, further coordination with our office is recommended. Please send the results of your assessment including any habitat surveys to:

    Supervisor
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    70 Commercial St., Suite 300
    Concord, NH 03301

    Include in your letter:
    A detailed description of the proposed project, including approximate proposed project construction schedule and project activities (e.g., land clearing, utilities, stormwater management). Site plans are often helpful in our evaluation process.

    • A description of the natural characteristics of the property and surrounding area (e.g., forested areas, freshwater wetlands, open waters, and soils). Photographs are often helpful in assessing the habitat. Additionally, please include a description of surrounding land use (residential, agricultural, or commercial).
    • The location of the above referenced property and extent of any project related activities or discharges clearly indicated on a copy of a USGS 7.5 Minute Topographic Quadrangle (Quad) with the name of the Quad(s) and latitude/longitude clearly labeled.
    • A description of conservation measures to avoid or minimize impacts to listed species.

    Why does this matter?- In a case where no habitat is present, a quick and easy determination can be made that further coordination is not necessary. In a case where habitat is present, but you believe that the project activities will not impact listed species, it is important to coordinate with us to ensure that all project activities and all potential effects (direct and indirect) have been considered.

    (Please allow 30 days following our receipt of your request for processing.)

Step 3. - Based on the results of the habitat survey and a description of the proposed project (including information as to whether any potential habitat may be directly or indirectly affected), the involved Federal agency may determine:

    • The proposed project will result in no effect to any T/E species and no further coordination or consultation with the Service is required;
    • Additional information (e.g., surveys) is required to determine whether any T/E species are likely to occur within the proposed project area; or
    • The proposed project "may affect" a T/E species and consultation with the Service is required.
    Files in PDF format will require Acrobat Reader to access the content. If you do not have a copy, please select the link [or click the image] to take you to the Adobe website where you can download a free copy. Get Adobe Acrobat Reader

 

 

Last updated: March 3, 2014