Nevada Fish & Wildlife Office
Pacific Southwest Region

Ecological Services

Water Projects

If wetlands, springs, or streams occur in the vicinity of the project, we ask that you be aware of potential impacts project activities may have on these areas. Discharge of fill material into wetlands or waters of the United States is regulated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) pursuant to section 404 of the Clean Water Act of 1972, as amended. We recommend you contact the Corps’ Regulatory Section 300 Booth Street, Room 2103, Reno, Nevada 89509, (775) 784-5304 or 321 North Mall Drive, Suite L-101, St. George, Utah 84790-7314, (435) 986-3979 regarding the possible need for a permit.

Springs on or near the project site are sensitive to a wide variety of activities and may be occupied by rare aquatic organisms (macroinvertebrates) that may be affected by the proposed action(s). Recent studies have found approximately 100 species of aquatic macroinvertebrates in springs and springbrooks throughout the western United States, including springsnails, caddisflies, beetles, true bugs, and crustaceans. There is concern for these species because some are narrowly distributed and, in many cases, their habitats have become highly degraded. Many springs in Nevada have not yet been surveyed to determine if they are occupied by macroinvertebrates. For those which have been surveyed, gravel substrate, flowing high quality water, and minimal disturbance are believed to be important habitat components to maintain viable populations of these species. Measures should be considered to protect the springs and macroinvertebrates during project planning and implementation.

 
For projects in the Truckee River Basin:
The LCT Truckee River Recovery Implementation Team (TRIT) has finalized the Short-Term Action Plan (2003) for Lahontan cutthroat trout (2.5MB PDF). This Short-Term Action Plan identifies priority areas with current or potential opportunities to support LCT or important habitats that would sustain various life history stages. Under the ESA, completed projects should not preclude future recovery and survival of this species. Projects should be reviewed for all direct and indirect impacts that they may have on riparian and aquatic habitats as they relate to LCT, and that you consult with the Service accordingly under section 7 of the Act.
 
For projects in the Walker River Basin:
The LCT Walker River Recovery Implementation Team (WRIT) has finalized the Short-Term Action Plan (2003) for Lahontan cutthroat trout (2.5MB PDF). This Short-Term Action Plan identifies priority areas with current or potential opportunities to support LCT or important habitats that would sustain various life history stages. Under the Act, completed projects should not preclude future recovery and survival of this species. Projects should be reviewed for all direct and indirect impacts that they may have on riparian and aquatic habitats as they relate to LCT, and that you consult with the Service accordingly under section 7 of the Act.
 
Last updated: April 16, 2014