Traditional Ecological Knowledge - Federal Register Notices and Funding

The term Traditional Ecological Knowledge, or TEK, is used to describe the knowledge held by indigenous cultures about their immediate environment and the cultural practices that build on that knowledge. Traditional ecological knowledge includes an intimate and detailed knowledge of plants, animals, and natural phenomena, the development and use of appropriate technologies for hunting, fishing, trapping, agriculture, and forestry, and a holistic knowledge, or "world view" which parallels the scientific discipline of ecology (Berkes 1993).

Bald eagle. Credit: Dave Menke.Federal Register Notice:

Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Sonoran Desert Area Bald Eagle as Threatened or Endangered
We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 12-month finding on a petition to list the Sonoran Desert Area population of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). After review of the best available scientific and commercial information, we find that listing the Sonoran Desert Area population of bald eagle does not qualify as a DPS and listing the Sonoran Desert Area population of bald eagle is not warranted at this time. Read More.

Funding:

North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative 2012 Funding Announcement
The North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) is pleased to announce the award of over $300,000 to seven projects that address using Traditional Ecological Knowledge, where appropriate, to help inform natural and cultural resource management. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided funds to the NPLCC for these projects. Two of the projects are co-sponsored by the Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC). FY 12 TEK Project Funding Announcement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: August 6, 2013