Traditional Ecological Knowledge - FWS Applications

The term Traditional Ecological Knowledge, or TEK, is used to describe the knowledge held by indigenous cultures about their immediate environment and the cultural practices that build on that knowledge. Traditional ecological knowledge includes an intimate and detailed knowledge of plants, animals, and natural phenomena, the development and use of appropriate technologies for hunting, fishing, trapping, agriculture, and forestry, and a holistic knowledge, or "world view" which parallels the scientific discipline of ecology (Berkes 1993).

A Poster Presentation - Contributions Of Indigenous Knowledge To Fisheries Management by: Susan Georgette
Please click here to view poster

Federal Subsistence Management Program - Alaska
The Federal Subsistence Management Program is a multi agency effort to provide the opportunity for a subsistence way of life by rural Alaskans on federal public lands and waters while maintaining healthy populations of fish and wildlife. This dependence on wild resources is both cultural, social and economic. Alaska's indigenous inhabitants have relied upon the traditional harvest of wild foods for thousands of years and have passed this way of life, its culture, and values down through generations. (Many of these Reports contain TEK studies that include methodologies and results.)

2010 Fisheries Resource Monitoring Plan
To increase the quantity and quality of information available for management of subsistence fisheries, the Fisheries Resource Monitoring Program (Monitoring Program) was established within the Office of Subsistence Management. The Monitoring Program was envisioned as a collaborative inter-agency, inter-disciplinary approach to enhance existing fisheries research, and effectively communicate information needed for subsistence fisheries management on Federal public lands. Harvest monitoring and traditional ecological knowledge (HM-TEK) studies address assessment of subsistence fisheries including quantification of harvest and effort, and description and assessment of fishing and use patterns. Read more.

The Fishes Gathered in Cherokee Country
Since 1999, under the authority of Title VIII of ANILCA, the Federal government has assumed expanded management responsibility for subsistence fisheries on Federal public lands in Alaska. Expanded subsistence fisheries management has imposed substantial new informational needs for the Federal system. Section 812 of ANILCA directs the Departments of the Interior and Agriculture, cooperating with the State of Alaska and other Federal agencies, to undertake research on fish and wildlife and subsistence uses on Federal public lands. To increase the quantity and quality of information available for management of subsistence fisheries, the Fisheries Resource Monitoring Program (Monitoring Program) was established within the Office of Subsistence Management. The Monitoring Program was envisioned as a collaborative inter-agency, inter-disciplinary approach to enhance existing fisheries research, and effectively communicate information needed for subsistence fisheries management on Federal public lands. Read more.

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: August 6, 2013