Gray Wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains
Mountain-Prairie Region

Wyoming Gray Wolf Recovery Status Report

From:               USFWS Wyoming Wolf Recovery Project Leader, Jackson, WY

Subject:           Status of Gray Wolf Management in Wyoming and the NRM

WYOMING WOLF WEEKLY- Nov. 22 through Dec. 3, 2010

           
Web Address – USFWS reports (past weekly and annual reports) can be viewed at http://westerngraywolf.fws.gov .   All weekly and annual reports are government property and can be used for any purpose.  Please distribute as you see fit.

2009 Annual Report
The 2009 Interagency Annual Wolf (Canis lupus) Report for the NRM DPS in 2009 can be viewed on-line at http://westerngraywolf.fws.gov .  The Idaho and Montana state sections of the annual wolf report are also available on-line at the websites for Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks http://fwp.mt.gov/wildthings/management/wolf/default.html and Idaho Department of Fish and Game http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/wildlife/wolves.  The annual wolf report is composed of five Sections: 1) Montana; 2) Wyoming; 3) Idaho; 4) USFWS overview of dispersal, funding, litigation, and relevant publications; and 5) Tables and Figures of wolf population statistics and wolf depredations. 

Information about Oregon wolves can be viewed at: 
www.dfw.state.or.us/wolves

Information about Washington wolves can be viewed at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/

 

MONITORING
Wyoming (including YNP): Based on preliminary estimates as of December 3, 2010, we estimate > 360 wolves in 42 packs (including 23 BP) in Wyoming in 2010. Figures 1 and Table 1 display preliminary population data recorded as of December 3, 2010. All additional population data recorded between December 3 and December 31, 2010 will be reported in our Weekly Reports and our 2010 Annual Report. The Wyoming wolf population is distributed as follows:

Wyoming (outside YNP): >235 wolves in >32 packs (including >17 BP).

YNP: >125 wolves in 10 packs (including 6 BP).
             
Figure 1. Wolf population growth in WY (outside YNP) and in YNP from 2000-2010.
Figure 1. Wolf population growth in WY (outside YNP) and in YNP from 2000-2010.

 

Table 1. Total wolf mortality in Wyoming (outside YNP) from 2003 - 2010.
Table 1. Total wolf mortality in Wyoming (outside YNP) from 2003 - 2010.

 

CONTROL
Wyoming: We continue to manage wolf population growth and wolf distribution to minimize chronic loss of livestock from wolves and promote wolf conservation by maintaining the Wyoming wolf population well above recovery objectives. Figures 2-3 and Tables 2-3 display preliminary depredation and control data recorded as of December 3, 2010.

Figure 2. Annual number of cattle and sheep losses per year in WY (outside YNP) from 2000-2010.Figure 2. Annual number of cattle and sheep losses per year in WY (outside YNP) from 2000-2010.

 

Table 2. Confirmed cattle and sheep depredations by county from 2006 through 2010.

                                 Cattle                                                                 Sheep
Table 2. Confirmed cattle and sheep depredations by county from 2006 through 2010.
Table 3. Confirmed livestock depredations and control actions in WY from 2003-2010.
         Table 3. Confirmed livestock depredations and control actions in WY from 2003-2010.
*One foal was killed by wolves (recorded as confirmed), 2 horses were chased by wolves and injured when they were run through a fence (recorded as 1 confirmed and 1 probable), and 1 horse was chased by wolves and broke its leg when it was run over a cattle guard (recorded as probable). All 3 injured horses had to be euthanized.
** In addition to 30 confirmed cattle depredations (losses), 1 dead calf was recorded as a probable wolf-kill, and 7 calves & 1 steer were also injured by wolves.

 


Figure 3. Annual number of wolf packs in Wyoming (outside YNP) and the number of wolf packs that are involved in at least 1 livestock depredation per given year.  

RESEARCH
Nothing to report at this time. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND RELATED ACTIVITIES   
Nothing to report at this time. 

OUTREACH AND EDUCATION
 On 12/3/01, Jimenez spoke with the Sublette County Predator Management District Board in Pinedale, WY.

The Montana Fish Wildlife and parks Department recently hired Abby Nelson as a wolf specialist working out of Livingston, MT. Abby is completing her masters degree from the University of Wyoming where she researched wolf habitat selection and wolf/livestock interactions west of Cody, WY.

Carter Niemeyer's memoir, Wolfer, is available at www.carterniemeyer.com, and later in the month on Amazon.com.  SYNOPSIS: His plan was to stay in Iowa, maybe get a job counting ducks, or do a little farming. But events conspired to fling Carter Niemeyer westward and straight into the jaws of wolves. From his early years wrangling ornery federal trappers, eagles and grizzlies, to winning a skinning contest that paved the way for wolf reintroduction in the Northern Rockies, Carter Niemeyer reveals the wild and bumpy ride that turned a trapper – a killer – into a champion of wolves.  This memoir, with an introduction by Nicholas Evans, author of The Horse Whisperer, features wolf and other wildlife issues in Montana, Iowa, Idaho and Washington, as well as a cast of unforgettable characters. 370 pages, paperback, 30 images; edited by Dee Lane of The Oregonian.

FURTHER INFORMATION
To request an investigation of livestock injured or killed by wolves, please contact the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Wildlife Services at (307)261-5336.

For additional information, please contact:
Ed Bangs (Helena, MT) (406)449-5225 x204 or Ed_Bangs@FWS.GOV
Mike Jimenez (Jackson) (307)733-7096 or (307)330-5631 or Mike_Jimenez@FWS.GOV
Scott Becker (Cody) (307)527-8916 or (307)699-3411 or Scott_Becker@FWS.GOV

Last updated: November 8, 2012