Office of External Affairs
Mountain-Prairie Region

NEWS RELEASE

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Mountain-Prairie Region
134 Union Boulevard
Lakewood, Colorado 80228

UPPER COLORADO RIVER ENDANGERED FISH RECOVERY PROGRAM

May 21, 2008

CONTACT:  Justyn Hock, 970-248-0625
                      Brent Uilenberg, 970-248-0641
                      Debbie Felker, 303-969-7322,  x227                       

 

Price-Stubb Fish Passage Construction

is Complete

 

LAKEWOOD-Colo. -- The Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program) announced today that Kissner G.C. Inc., has completed construction of a unique fish passage at the Price-Stubb Diversion Dam on the Colorado River.  The 900-foot-long passage restores river access to four species of endangered Colorado River fishes – the humpback chub, bonytail, Colorado pikeminnow and razorback sucker.  The passage consists of 190 strategically-placed concrete cylinders that form the fish passage and create better flow conditions for the fish. 

 

“This was a challenging project;” said Mark Wernke, Design and Construction Group manager for the Bureau of Reclamation, who oversaw construction.  “Construction had to occur in the winter during low river flows and be completed before spring runoff.  The Colorado River had to be diverted so construction could take place in the river channel.  Kissner G.C. Inc. successfully met those challenges.” 

 

The Price-Stubb Diversion Dam was the last barrier to fish migration on the Colorado River from Utah’s Lake Powell to the upper end of critical habitat near Rifle, Colo. Completion of the Price-Stubb fish passage gives endangered fish access to 50 miles of critical habitat that has been blocked since the 8-foot-high diversion dam was completed in 1911. Other Recovery Program fish passages are in place at the Grand Valley Irrigation Company Diversion Dam and Grand Valley Project Diversion Dam on the Colorado River and at the Redlands Diversion Dam on the Gunnison River.


Reclamation oversees capital construction projects for the Recovery Program as part of efforts to recover the endangered fishes.

 

“Completion of this passage is cause for celebration,” said Recovery Program Director Bob Muth.  “The passage is the culmination of several years of collaborative efforts with the local community and state and federal agencies.  Reopening river corridors with fish passages enables these big-river, endangered fishes to reach the variety of habitats they require to complete their life cycle.”

 

Established in 1988, the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program is a voluntary, cooperative program whose purpose is to recover the endangered fishes while water development proceeds in accordance with federal and state laws and interstate compacts.  For more information, call 303-969-7322, ext. 227 or visit the Recovery Program’s website: coloradoriverrecovery.fws.gov.          

 

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