U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Division of Refuge Planning
Mountain-Prairie Region

Completed Plan Contacts

The Service completed this plan
in 2003.


REFUGE EMAIL

alamosa@fws.gov


REFUGE ADDRESSES

Alamosa–Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuges
8249 Emperius Road
Alamosa, Colorado 81101

6120 Highway 15
Monte Vista, Colorado 81144


REFUGE TELEPHONE

719 / 589 4021


REFUGE WEB SITES

www.fws.gov/refuge/alamosa/
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/monte_vista/

 

Comprehensive Conservation Plan


Alamosa-Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuges

Colorado

Description

The comprehensive conservation plan sets the management and use of the Alamosa and Monte Vista national wildlife refuges for 15 years. The refuges are located in the San Luis Valley, a high mountain basin located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a flat, broad depression between mountain ranges.

The refuges were established under the authority of the Migratory Bird Conservation Act "for use as inviolate sanctuaries, or any other management purpose, for migratory birds." Both refuges are major stopovers for greater sandhill cranes during migration.

Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge

  • Established in 1962.
  • Comprises 11,169 acres.
  • Located 3 miles east of Alamosa, Colorado, in Alamosa County and 15 miles east of Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Public Land Order 3899, dated December 1965, withdrew 86 acres of public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management for inclusion in Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge.

The Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge consists of wet meadows, river oxbows, and riparian corridors primarily within the floodplain of the Rio Grande. Dry uplands on the refuge are vegetated with greasewood and saltbush. 

Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge

  • Established in 1952.
  • Comprises 14,800 acres.
  • Located 8 miles south of Monte Vista, Colorado, in Rio Grande County.
  • Public Land Order 2204, dated September 19, 1960, withdrew 800 acres of public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management for inclusion in Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge.

The Service manages water intensively on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge with dikes and other water control structures. This management creates a patchwork of diverse wetland habitats ranging from shallow wet meadows to open water.

Image of the plan cover showing wetlands on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge.

Cover photograph © Robert Sanders/Ducks Unlimited

The plan

The following are major actions in the comprehensive conservation plan:

  • Take a proactive approach to management planning, monitoring of actions, and consistent outreach and service to the public.
  • Determine if current goals are appropriate. For habitat goals, the refuges will gather and analyze information about (1) prehistoric and historical environmental conditions of the San Luis Valley, (2) effects of habitat management practices, (3) current needs of migratory birds and what the best role is for both refuges in providing habitat, and (4) how to best control invasive plants and prevent their spread.
  • Use habitat management tools, water management, rest, prescribed fire, prescribed grazing, farming, and habitat protection to provide wildlife habitat at the refuges.
  • Manage public use, cultural resources, and elk at the refuges.

Documents

Comprehensive conservation plan (CCP)
CCP 2003 (6 MB PDF)

By section, for faster download:
CCP (plan only) (2 MB PDF)
Maps (4 MB PDF)

Draft CCP and environmental assessment (EA)
Draft CCP and EA 2002 (7 MB PDF)

By section, for faster download:
Draft CCP and EA (plan only) (2 MB PDF)
Maps (5 MB PDF)