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Fisheries - Aquatic Invasive Species
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

About Aquatic Invasive Species

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force | Species of Concern | State AIS Programs | 100th Meridian Initiative | Partners in Conservation | Photos & Video | Contact Information & Useful Links | Open / Close All

Photo Zebra Mussels.In the Fisheries program, we are working to ensure that our staff doesn't move any aquatic invasive species (AIS) to new waters when fulfilling the mission of the Service. By inspecting our fish hatcheries and their microscopic young, we eliminate the chance of spreading AIS when stocking fish in our waters. This is a crucial step in prevention as these non-native species spread quickly by “hitchhiking” to new areas through mud on boots, vegetation caught on vehicles, or water left in boats. The invasion of AIS can cost our communities millions of dollars in restoration as they can occupy habitat our native species use, consume food our native species require; and even consume the native species themselves. To read more about our Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Plan which helps prevent the spread of AIS, click here!


Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force »

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The ANS Task Force is an inter-governmental organization that also focuses on prevention and control of aquatic nuisance species. AIS coordinators from the eight states of our region work closely with partners and the private sector to identify and reduce the risk of harmful aquatic species that are being introduced into U.S. waters. It is through this Task Force that state plans and programs are able to carry out mitigation action against these nuisance species such as the 100th Meridian Initiative. More information about this organization can be found at www.ANSTaskForce.gov


Region 6 - Species of Concern »


State AIS Programs »


100th Meridian Initiative »

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Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers logo graphic.This initiative is a cooperative effort between local, state, and federal agencies to prevent and control the spread of aquatic nuisance species such as the zebra/quagga mussel. The Fish and Wildlife Service provides extensive funding for the Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers Campaign in order to raise awareness and protect our aquatic resources. Some preventative measures taken under this effort include boat inspections, surveys, and eradication of detected ANS species. Click on the campaign logo to read more about the 100th Meridian Initiative!

 


Partners in Conservation »


Photos and Videos »

Photos

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  • Application of copper sulfate crystals throughout a Nebraska lake to eradicate  and prevent the spread of quagga mussels. Credit: USFWS.

    Application of copper sulfate crystals throughout a Nebraska lake to eradicate and prevent the spread of quagga mussels. Credit: USFWS.

  • Infestation of zebra mussels at El Dorado Reservoir, Kansas in 2004. Credit: USFWS.

    Infestation of zebra mussels at El Dorado Reservoir, Kansas in 2004. Credit: USFWS.

  • Zebra mussels attach to any hard surface.  Credit: USFWS.

    Zebra mussels attach to any hard surface. Credit: USFWS.

  • Complete invasion of zebra mussels at the El Dorado Reservoir. Credit: USFWS.

    Complete invasion of zebra mussels at the El Dorado Reservoir. Credit: USFWS.

  • Average size of a zebra mussel. Credit: USFWS.

    Average size of a zebra mussel. Credit: USFWS.

  • Quagga mussels on settling pond piping near Lake Mead. Credit: USFWS.

    Quagga mussels on settling pond piping near Lake Mead. Credit: USFWS.

  • Quagga mussels will adhere to most hard surfaces, impacting boats and infrastructures. Credit: USFWS.

    Quagga mussels will adhere to most hard surfaces, impacting boats and infrastructures. Credit: USFWS.

  • Young zebra mussels found in Kansas. Credit: USFWS.

    Young zebra mussels found in Kansas. Credit: USFWS.

  • The invasive Asian carps are moving up the Missouri River system. Credit: USFWS.

    The invasive Asian carps are moving up the Missouri River system. Credit: USFWS.

  • Cleverly hidden mussel discovered on a boat at an inspection station in Colorado in April, 2012. Credit: Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

    Cleverly hidden mussel discovered on a boat at an inspection station in Colorado in April, 2012. Credit: Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

  • Fish stocking. Credit: USFWS.

    Fish stocking. Credit: USFWS.

  • Measuring catfish. Credit: USFWS.

    Measuring catfish. Credit: USFWS.

  • Conducting field work in a fashion that minimizes the spread of invasives is essential in maintaining healthy wildlife habitats. Credit: USFWS.

    Conducting field work in a fashion that minimizes the spread of invasives is essential in maintaining healthy wildlife habitats. Credit: USFWS.

  • Fish stocking is an activity that requires the AIS Program’s expertise in order to prevent nuisance species from spreading. Credit: USFWS.

    Fish stocking is an activity that requires the AIS Program’s expertise in order to prevent nuisance species from spreading. Credit: USFWS.

  • Utah Division of Wildlife and FWS employees performing AIS inspections on equipment at Ouray National Fish Hatchery.  Credit: USFWS.

    Utah Division of Wildlife and FWS employees performing AIS inspections on equipment at Ouray National Fish Hatchery. Credit: USFWS.

  • AIS/Native Mussel Survey on the Wind River Reservation.  Credit: USFWS.

    AIS/Native Mussel Survey on the Wind River Reservation. Credit: USFWS.

  • FWS Employees performing an electro-fishing sauger study on the Wind River Reservation also monitor non-native fishes.  Credit: USFWS.

    FWS Employees performing an electro-fishing sauger study on the Wind River Reservation also monitor non-native fishes. Credit: USFWS.

Video Links

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Don’t Move a Mussel! By Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission
Importance of Inspections by Colorado State Parks
Lose the Hitchhikers or Lose Your Lake by ND Game & Fish


Contact Information & Useful Links »

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: April 16, 2014
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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