Migratory Bird Program
Conserving the Nature of America
CCMB Image Eagle Management and Monitoring Information

 

Eagle Management

Of all America’s wildlife, Bald and Golden eagles hold perhaps the most revered place in our national history and culture. The Bald Eagle was once in danger of extinction in the lower 48 states, with fewer than 500 pairs remaining. Bald Eagles were removed from the endangered species list in June 2007 because their populations have recovered sufficiently.

Golden Eagle in FlightThe Bald Eagle is no longer on the Endangered Species List, but it is protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (Eagle Act) and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA.) When the Bald Eagle was delisted, the Service proposed regulations to create a permit program to authorize limited take of Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles where take is associated with otherwise lawful activities. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service remains committed to the conservation of both the Golden Eagle and Bald Eagle populations.

Golden Eagles received protection under the Eagle Act in 1962.  In extending this protection to Golden Eagles, Congress cited the threat of their extinction, their similarity of appearance to Bald Eagles, and their value to agriculture as predators of rodents.  Both species of eagles have special significance to Native American culture.

When the Bald Eagle was delisted, the Service proposed regulations to create a permit program to authorize limited take of Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles where take is associated with otherwise lawful activities. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service remains committed to the conservation of both the Golden Eagle and Bald Eagle populations.

 

New Actions

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Seeks Input on Eagle Management Objectives and
Possible Changes to Eagle Permit Changes

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is requesting public input on eagle management objectives, as well as suggestions to amend the 2009 regulations for permits for nonpurposeful take of eagles (50 CFR 22.26) and eagle nests (50 CFR 22.27). 

The process to revise the eagle rule began in April 2012, when the Service put forth an Advanced Notice of Rulemaking (ANPR) about permits for non-purposeful take of eagles.  The ANPR highlighted three issues on which the Service invited public comment: eagle population management objectives, compensatory mitigation and programmatic permit issuance criteria.  The upcoming public information meetings are a continuation of this process.

Public Scoping Meeting information

Recent Management Actions

Regulations Finalized for Revised Interior Eagle Permit Rule

The Department of the Interior announced changes to regulations enabling the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to better monitor and address the long-term impacts of renewable energy projects and other activities on federally protected eagles. In addition to these immediate changes, the Service will continue its comprehensive review of all eagle permitting regulations to determine if other modifications are necessary to increase their efficiency and effectiveness.

2012 Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) Seeking Public Input On the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Permit Program

In September 2009, the Service published a final rule establishing new permit regulations under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (Eagle Act) for nonpurposeful take of eagles (74 FR 46836). These regulations relate to permits to take eagles where the take is associated with, but not the purpose of, otherwise lawful activities. The regulations provide for both standard permits and programmatic permits.

Past Actions related to the 2009 Eagle Rule Permit

Permits

Eagle Population Information

 

 

 

 

 

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Last updated: October 15, 2014