Midwest Region
Conserving the Nature of America

Northern Long-eared Bat Listed as Threatened

News Release: Protections Finalized for Threatened Northern Long-Eared Bats - January 13, 2016

Final 4(d) Rule (PDF)

FAQ About Final 4(d) Rule

WNS Zone Map (PDF) - This map is updated on the first of every month if there are new counties with verified occurrences of white-nose syndrome or Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the fungus that causes the disease.

Learn more about the Northern Long-eared Bat and listing under the ESA

News Release: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Protects Northern Long-eared Bat as Threatened Under Endangered Species Act - April 1, 2015

Final Listing Rule (PDF)

Northern long-eared bat with visible symptoms of White-nose Syndrome. LaSalle County, Illinois. January 2013. Photo courtesy of Steve Taylor/University of Illinois.

Northern long-eared bat with visible symptoms of White-nose Syndrome. LaSalle County, Illinois. January 2013. Photo courtesy of Steve Taylor/University of Illinois.

Why did the Service list the northern long-eared as threatened?

The northern long-eared bat was once a common resident of forests from the Atlantic coast to as far west as eastern Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately, this particular bat is one of the species hardest hit by the disease, white-nose syndrome. In forests of the Northeast, population declines have been dramatic in a very short time. Declines of up to 99 percent have been documented through hibernacula surveys and substantiated by summer surveys. The range of the northern long-eared bat extends into 37 states and white-nose syndrome has spread to 26 of those states, with the fungus that causes the disease documented in an additional 4 states. Based on surveillance and research since white-nose syndrome symptoms were first seen on bats in 2006, we expect that the disease will spread throughout this bat’s range and impacts will be the same as those documented in areas already affected by white-nose syndrome.

Questions? Contact us

Inquiries about local or regional issues may be directed to:

Midwest (IA, IL, IN, MI, MN, MO, OH, WI)
Georgia Parham
812-334-4261 x 1203
Georgia_Parham@fws.gov

Northeast (CT, DE, ME, MD, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, VA, WV, and District of Columbia)
Meagan Racey
413-253-8558
Meagan_Racey@fws.gov

Southeast (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN)
Jennifer Strickland
404-679-7299
Jennifer_Strickland@fws.gov

Southwest (AZ, NM, OK, TX)
Lesli Gray
972-569-8588
Lesli_Gray@fws.gov

Mountain-Prairie (CO, KS, MT, NE, ND, SD, UT, WY)
Ryan Moehring
303-236-0345
Ryan_Moehring@fws.gov

White-nose Syndrome
Catherine Hibbard
413-253-8569
Catherine_Hibbard@fws.gov

 

 


Last updated: January 15, 2016