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Midwest Region

 

Find out what Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration funding does for conservation in your State

The Lake Char is one of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ research vessels. It works in the waters of Lake Superior and is in part supported by Sport Fish Restoration funding. Photo by Michigan Department of Natural Resources.
The Lake Char is one of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ research vessels. It works in the waters of Lake Superior and is in part supported by Sport Fish Restoration funding. Photo by Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Each year, the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program provides funding to each state in the Midwest to support localized conservation efforts. This year, the Midwest Region is receiving over $210 million dollars in grant funding. In the past, conservation efforts including native plant restoration, deer population research, elk restoration, fish stocking, and other state-specific conservation needs have been realized with the help of this funding.

Across the nation, more than $1.1 billion will be distributed to state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies to fund fish and wildlife conservation and recreation projects. The funding for the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration grants comes from a user-pay, user-benefit system.  Revenues come from excise taxes generated by the sale of sporting firearms, ammunition, archery equipment, fishing equipment and tackle, and electric outboard motors. Recreational boaters also contribute to the program through fuel taxes on motorboats and small engines.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Programs have generated a total of more than $15.3 billion since their inception to conserve fish and wildlife resources. The origination of this program began in 1937 with the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Program and in 1950 with the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Program. The recipient fish and wildlife agencies have matched these program funds with more than $5.1 billion.

“For over 75 years, hunters, shooters, anglers and boaters have supported the conservation of fish and wildlife resources and the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program,” said Midwest Regional Director Tom Melius. “Their support has left a lasting legacy in the Midwest – restoring fish and wildlife populations, improving access for recreational boaters and boosting conservation related education programs helping people to connect with hunting, shooting, fishing and boating.”

These dollars are critical in sustaining healthy fish and wildlife populations and providing opportunities for people to connect with nature. The introduction of the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration excise tax has truly made for one of the most successful and unrivaled conservation stories in history!

Learn more about the great conservation work happening in your state here:

Illinois - $22 million
Indiana - $17 million
Iowa - $15 million
Michigan - $35 million
Minnesota - $35 million
Missouri - $27 million
Ohio - $22 million
Wisconsin - $34 million

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

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Last updated: April 8, 2014