Newsroom
Midwest Region

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 26, 2011

Contact:
Chuck Traxler, 612-713-5313
Charles_traxler@fws.gov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Will Not Propose Endangered Species Act Protection for Midwest Snail

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that a status review of the frigid ambersnail indicates protection of the snail under the Endangered Species Act is not warranted. The Service published its finding in the July 26, 2011 Federal Register.

Based on the best available scientific information, the Service determined the frigid ambersnail is not a currently living separate species, subspecies or distinct population segment. The frigid ambersnail was first described in 1927 from fossil specimens and was classified as a subspecies. In 1963, it was reclassified as a distinct species, again, using only fossils. It was not until 1985 that any live specimens, snails from Iowa, were identified as frigid ambersnails.

The validity of identifying these living snails as the same species as the fossil specimens has been questioned by a number of researchers for various reasons. Since the taxonomic identity of the modern living snail identified as the frigid ambersnail has not been confirmed by current species experts, it remains a fossil species (presumably extinct) and therefore cannot be considered for the protections of the ESA.

Fossil records of frigid ambersnails indicate it once inhabited eight states ranging from Nebraska and Iowa south to Mississippi and Louisiana, and east to Ohio and New York.

The Service was petitioned to list the frigid ambersnail in 2007 by Forest Guardians (now WildEarth Guardians) as part of a larger petition. In 2009, the Service published a 90-day finding and initiated a status review of the frigid ambersnail. The Service is announcing its 12- month finding after completing its status review.

For more information on the Endangered Species Act and threatened and endangered species in the Midwest, visit www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov. Connect with our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usfws, follow our tweets at www.twitter.com/usfwshq, watch our YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/usfws and download photos from our Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwshq

-FWS-

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

Connect with our Facebook page at facebook.com/usfwsmidwest, follow our tweets at twitter.com/usfwsmidwest, watch our YouTube Channel at youtube.com/usfws and download photos from our Flickr page at flickr.com/photos/usfwsmidwest.

Last updated: November 4, 2013