Inside Region 3
Midwest Region
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July 2013

Regional Director Tom Melius explores snail habitat and examines a survey board. Snails are attracted to the bottom of the board. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo by Richard King)
Regional Director Tom Melius explores snail habitat and examines a survey board. Snails are attracted to the bottom of the board. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo by Richard King)

Surrogate Species Selection Continues
With A Little Help From Our Friends

The Fish and Wildlife Service is on a steady and adventurous trek down the path of identifying surrogate species and I’m pleased to note that our recent meeting on the subject with our state partners was productive. 

The meeting included representatives from 10 states, in other words, 20 percent of this nation’s state-level partners who will help us continue to move ahead with our work. This effort has provided an opportunity to discuss and learn from each other about the surrogate species approach. I know that our learning will continue.

The process we've begun is one that certainly takes time, but one that we expect will yield a “Version 1.0” of our regional approach to implementing surrogate species by the end of the year. We will take special care that our work and processes inform and engage all of our state, tribal and other partners. Throughout this, I applaud each of you for remaining engaged and offering your best to continually ensure success and to learn lessons as we forge further ahead.

We have recently transitioned to a new model of working with our tribal partners through the establishment of three new zone Native American liaisons within the region. Through this model we hope to better serve the interests of our tribal partners and enhance existing relationships.  In this month’s issue, you’ll read of the success of three of our tribal partners in receiving more than $595,000 in Tribal Wildlife Grants for 2013 (Click Here to read the story).

We’re also tending to the waterways this time of year which we believe will result in even greater success down the road with another good year of sea lamprey control treatments. The hard work of our Fisheries program field staff can only further our fruitful efforts toward lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

We also expect to benefit from the increase in the return of fish tags from our mass marking work. Read the story on the recently completed efforts for this year from our Great Lakes Fish Tag and Recovery Lab (Click Here to read the story). Returns of these tags result in better information than ever before in the hands of our managers who work with our partners to make important fisheries management decisions in the Great Lakes.

That is just a small slice of a plethora of outstanding work going on in the field, and I again want you to know how deeply it is appreciated.  As you each work through your own repetitions of the processes and procedures in your daily work, also remember that safety is paramount. You are our most valued asset to accomplishing the great things that we do and I can’t stress enough the need to use good common sense and the safety skills and knowledge we are reminded of each year in our training.

Enjoy this issue of Inside Region 3!

T.O.M.

 


 

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Last updated: July 9, 2013