Wisconsin Ecological Services Field Office

Midwest Region

 

 

Wisconsin Field Office

2661 Scott Tower Drive
New Franken, WI 54229-9565
Phone: 920-866-1717
Fax: 920-866-1710
TTY: 1-800-877-8339 (Federal Relay)

e-mail: GreenBay@fws.gov

 


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We work with public and private entities to conserve and restore Wisconsin's endangered species, migratory birds, wetlands, and other important fish and wildlife resources.

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Feature Story

 

Protections Finalized for Threatened Northern Long-Eared Bats

 

Regualtions focus on significant threats to the species so conservation efforts can be focused where they have the greatest effect

 

Northern long-eared bat in a cave.

Northern long-eared bat. Photo by Ann Froschauer/USFWS.

 

January 13, 2016

 

In an effort to conserve the northern long-eared bat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced a final rule today that uses flexibilities under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to tailor protections to areas affected by white-nose syndrome during the bat’s most sensitive life stages. The rule is designed to protect the bat while minimizing regulatory requirements for landowners, land managers, government agencies and others within the species’ range.

 

“The overwhelming threat to the northern long-eared bat is white-nose syndrome,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “Until there is a solution to the white-nose syndrome crisis, the outlook for this bat will not improve. This rule tailors regulatory protections in a way that makes sense and focuses protections where they will make a difference for the bat.”

 

The Service listed the northern long-eared bat as threatened under the ESA in April 2015 and established an interim 4(d) rule following drastic population declines caused by white-nose syndrome in the eastern and midwestern United States. This deadly disease continues to spread westward and wreak havoc on cave-dwelling bats. In November 2015, presence of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome was confirmed in the 30th state – Nebraska.

 

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Last updated: February 12, 2016