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Northern Long-Eared Bat

Myotis septentrionalis

 

This northern long-eared bat, observed in Illinois, shows symptoms of white-nose syndrome.

This northern long-eared bat, observed in Illinois, shows symptoms of white-nose syndrome.

Photo by Steve Taylor; University of Illinois

 

Fact Sheet - Northern Long-Eared Bat

 

Questions and Answers: Six-Month Extension and Re-opening Comment Period on the Proposal to List Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered

 

Questions and Answers: Proposal to List Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered

 

Article: First Bat Proposed as Endangered Due to White-nose Syndrome

 

Interim Conference Guidance

Northern Long-eared Bat Interim Conference and Planning Guidance (Jan. 6, 2014) 67-page PDF; 1.2MB

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service developed the Interim Conference Guidance in response to questions we received from a variety of partners, particularly federal agencies, which have specific responsibilities under Section 7 of the ESA. The guidance provides a consistent source and assessment of the scientific information available for the northern long-eared bat and does not impose or require restrictions on projects.   The guidance provides advice and a suite of voluntary conservation options that project planners may consider.  It was intended to be used primarily by federal agencies during the time that this bat is proposed for listing, although the guidance also provides voluntary suggestions for non-federal entities.   The conservation measures identified in the guidance will not become blanket requirements if the northern long-eared bat is listed as endangered. Instead, the conservation measures we presented provide a list of possible conservation options that may be used, depending on site specific conditions, to minimize impacts to the bat and its habitat.  

 

August 2014: Public Information Sessions on Proposal to List

August 13, 2014

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold three public information webcasts in August to provide information and answer questions about our proposal to list the northern long-eared bat as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Webcasts will be Tuesday, August 19, at 1 p.m. Eastern; Wednesday, August 20, at 4 p.m. Eastern; and Thursday, August 21, at 7 p.m. Eastern.

 

People can join the 1-hour information sessions by calling a toll-free number and joining a web conference to view a presentation and participate in a facilitated question-and-answer session.

 

Read More »

 

Online Information Sessions - How to Participate

 

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The northern long-eared bat is found in the United States from Maine to North Carolina on the Atlantic Coast, westward to eastern Oklahoma and north through the Dakotas, even reaching into eastern Montana and Wyoming. In Canada it is found from the Atlantic Coast westward to the southern Yukon Territory and eastern British Columbia.

 

Northern long-eared bats spend winter hibernating in caves and abandoned mines, collectively call hibernacula.  During summer, they roost alone or in small colonies underneath bark or in cavities or crevices of both live trees and snags (dead trees).

 

On January 21, 2010, the Service received a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that the northern long-eared bat and eastern small-footed bat be listed as threatened or endangered. We determined that listing the eastern small-footed bat was not warranted but listing the northern long-eared bat was warranted. Therefore on October 2, 2013, we published a proposal to list the northern long-eared bat as endangered throughout its range under the Endangered Species Act.

 

Northern Long-eared Bat Proposal to List as Endangered

 

Fact Sheet: Northern Long-Eared Bat

 

Range Maps: Northern Long-Eared Bat Range Maps

 

White-nose Syndrome. org: A Coordinated Response to the Devastating Bat Disease

 

White Nose-Syndrome Fact Sheet (June 2014): The devastating disease of hibernating bats in North America (2-page PDF)

 

Bat Box Fact Sheet

Minnesota | Indiana | Wisconsin

 

Technical Journal Article: Economic Importance of Bats in Agriculture (Science 1 April 11)

 

June 30, 2014: Six-month Extension and Comment Period Re-opens

A notice for a six-month extension for the final listing determination on the northern long-eared bat published in the Federal Register on June 30, 2014.  We are also reopening the comment period on the proposal to list the bat as endangered; the 60-day comment period ends on August 29, 2014.  A final decision on listing the northern long-eared bat will be made no later than April 2, 2015.

 

News Release (June 30, 2014): Service Reopens Comment Period on Proposal to List the Northern Long-eared Bat as an Endangered Species


Questions and Answers: Six-Month Extension of Final Determination and Re-opening Comment Period on the Proposal to List Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered

 

Federal Register (June 30, 2014): 6-Month Extension of Final Determination on the Proposed Endangered Status for the Northern Long-Eared Bat (2-Page PDF)

 

Range Maps: Northern Long-Eared Bat Range Maps

 

White Nose-Syndrome Fact Sheet (June 2014): The devastating disease of hibernating bats in North America (2-page PDF)

 

Northern Long-Eared Bat Proposed as Endangered

 

News Release (Nov. 26, 2013): U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Extends Comment Period on Proposal to List the Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered

 

Federal Register Proposed Rule (October 2, 2013): 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Eastern Small-Footed Bat and the Northern Long-Eared Bat as Endangered or Threatened Species; Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat as an Endangered Species (36-page PDF Adobe PDF Icon)

 

Literature Cited: Literature Cited in Proposed Rule to List Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered (22-page PDF)

 

News Release (Oct. 17, 2013): U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Proposes Endangered Status for the Northern Long-eared Bat; Listing Not Warranted for Eastern Small-footed Bat

 

Questions and Answers: Proposed Listing of Northern Long-eared Bat as Endangered and Listing Not Warranted Finding for the Eastern Small-footed Bat

 

Fact Sheet: Northern Long-Eared Bat

 

Section 7 Consultation

Interim Conference Guidance

Northern Long-eared Bat Interim Conference and Planning Guidance (Jan. 6, 2014) 67-page PDF; 1.2MB - -

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service developed the Interim Conference Guidance in response to questions we received from a variety of partners, particularly federal agencies, which have specific responsibilities under Section 7 of the ESA. The guidance provides a consistent source and assessment of the scientific information available for the northern long-eared bat and does not impose or require restrictions on projects. The guidance provides advice and a suite of voluntary conservation options that project planners may consider. It was intended to be used primarily by federal agencies during the time that this bat is proposed for listing, although the guidance also provides voluntary suggestions for non-federal entities. The conservation measures identified in the guidance will not become blanket requirements if the northern long-eared bat is listed as endangered.  Instead, the conservation measures we presented provide a list of possible conservation options that may be used, depending on site specific conditions, to minimize impacts to the bat and its habitat.  

 

Section 7 Consultation with Federal Highway Administration

Section 7 Consultation with Federal Highway Administration: Indiana Bat and Northern Long-eared Bat

 


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Last updated: August 19, 2014