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Endangered Species Program Fiscal Year 2010
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Program

Notice of Availability of Federal Assistance - Request for Proposals

 

PDF Version of the RFP

 

Program Overview Information:

 

Federal Agency:

Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Program.

 

Funding Opportunity Title:

 

Fiscal year 2010 Endangered Species Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant Program

 

Announcement Type:

 

Initial announcement for the fiscal year 2010 request for proposals

 

Funding Opportunity Number:

 

FWS-10-ES-GLRI

 

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number:

 

66-469 – Great Lakes Program

 

Dates: Proposals must be either submitted via copy to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, BHW Federal Building, 1 Federal Drive, Fort Snelling, Minnesota 55111 (attn: Peter Fasbender) or electronically through www.Grants.gov by March 22, 2010. Subject to funding availability, proposals may be considered for funding until September 29, 2010.

Additional Information:

To accelerate the restoration of the Great Lakes, the President’s FY 2010 budget includes a new $475 million inter-agency initiative to address issues that affect the Great Lakes, such as invasive species, non-point source pollution, and toxics and contaminated sediment. The Initiative builds upon five years of work of the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force (IATF) and stakeholders, guided by the Great Lakes Regional Collaboration Strategy. The Initiative supports federal projects and over $250 million in grants and project agreements, jump-starting achievement of long term goals: safely eating the fish and swimming at our beaches, assuring safe drinking water, and providing a healthy ecosystem for fish and wildlife.

 

The Initiative was announced in May of 2009 as part of the President’s FY2010 budget. Information about the Initiative, Agency-by-Agency funding allocations, and general descriptions of the work they will do has been posted to http://www.epa.gov/glnpo/glri/index.html. The FWS-ES-GLRI provides grants and other assistance on a competitive basis to individuals, groups and agencies engaged in voluntary conservation efforts to benefit species listed or proposed as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), candidate species, or other at-risk species on private lands within the United States.

 

Information on the FWS-ES-GLRI is also available from the following sources:

 

Within Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, contact Peter Fasbender, BHW Federal Building, 1 Federal Drive, Fort Snelling, Minnesota 55111, 612/713-5343, or peter_fasbender@fws.gov.

 

Within Pennsylvania and New York, contact David Stilwell, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New York Field Office, 3817 Luker Road, Cortland, NY 13045, 607/753-9335, ext. 123, or david_stilwell@fws.gov.

 

I. Funding Opportunity Background

The Endangered Species Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grants Program (FWS-ESGLRI) provides grants and other assistance on a competitive basis to those individuals, groups, and government agencies engaged in voluntary conservation efforts to benefit species listed or proposed as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), candidate species, or other at-risk species within the Great Lakes Watershed of the United States.

 

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are soliciting project proposals for Federal assistance under the FWS-ES-GLRI. This document describes how you can apply for funding under the FWS-ES-GLRI and how we will determine which project proposals will be funded.

 

The Service will award grants for actions and activities that protect and restore habitats that benefit federally listed, proposed, or candidate species, or other at-risk species. Additionally, the Service, in cooperation with the grantees, must address Federal compliance issues, such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, and the Endangered Species Act. For the projects that are selected to receive funding, we will provide additional guidance on compliance with these requirements. Please see Section III for minimum eligibility criteria and Section V for additional application review information, including proposal evaluation criteria.

 

II. Award Information

The Service will make selections based upon those proposals submitted for consideration through this announcement. The FWS-ES-GLRI provides up to $1,850,000 in grants on a competitive basis to individuals, groups, and government agencies engaged in private, voluntary conservation efforts that benefit species listed or proposed as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), candidate species, or other at-risk species within the Great Lakes Watershed of the United States. Grant and/or cooperative agreements may be implemented. For cooperative agreements, the substantial involvement by the Service will be determined on a case by case basis.

 

III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

Private landowners, individually or as a group, are encouraged to submit project proposals for their properties. Individuals or groups (for example land conservancies, community organizations, or conservation organizations) working with private landowners or their own properties on conservation efforts are also encouraged to submit project proposals. Other governmental entities or affiliates, including federal, state, county, or other local governments or State-supported universities, are eligible to apply for FWS-ES-GLRI funding. In order to receive funding, projects will need to ensure that landowners are willing to allow the Service access to the project area in order to check on its progress when necessary.

 

2. Cost Sharing or Matching

To receive credit toward additional points in the ranking criteria, a project proposal must include a cost sharing component of the partners involved in the project (the costshare may be an in-kind contribution, including equipment, materials, operations, and maintenance costs). The cost share must come from sources other than the FWS-ESGLRI. Applications submitted without a cost sharing component will be considered eligible, but will not receive credit for such during the proposal review and evaluation process.

 

3. Other

Table 1 indicates which species are endangered (E), threatened (T), or candidates (C) occurring within the Great Lakes Watershed. Additionally, the “Trend” column indicates the general population trend of the species as either stable (S), increasing (I), or declining (D). For the purposes of the FWS-ES-GLRI, an “at-risk species” is any species formally recognized as a species of conservation concern, such as species listed by a State or Territory. We recommend that you contact your State natural resources agency to determine which species are recognized as species of conservation concern (e.g., State listed as endangered, threatened, special concern, or other similar designations).

 

SPECIES LISTED
STATUS
TREND   SPECIES LISTED
STATUS
TREND
Canada Lynx T S   Hungerford’s
Crawling Water
Beetle
E S
Gray wolf T I   Karner Blue Butterfly E S
Indiana Bat E D   Mitchell's Satyr Butterfly E D
Clubshell E D   American
Hart’s-tongue
Fern
T D
Northern
Riffleshell
S   Dwarf Lake Iris T S
Rayed Bean C D   Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid T S
kirtland's Warbler E S   Fassett's Locoweed T I
Piping Plover E I   Houghton's Goldenrod T S
Bog Turtle T S   Lakeside Daisy T S
Copperbelly Watersnake T D   Leedy's Roseroot T S
Eastern Massasauga C D   Michigan Monkey-flower E S
Lake Erie Watersnake T I   Northern Wild Monkshood T S
Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail T D   Pitcher's Thistle T S
American Burying Beetle E S   Prairie Bush Clover T S
Hine's Emerald Dragonfly E S   Small Whorled Pogonia T S

 

The FWS-ES-GLRI supports on-the-ground conservation actions as well as applied research activities. Examples of the types of projects that may be funded include managing invasive species, reintroducing imperiled species, implementing measures to minimize risk from disease, securing populations with species management plans, restoring streams that support imperiled species, documenting species presence, or planting native vegetation to restore a rare plant community. This is not an exhaustive list of the various projects that may be funded under the FWS-ES-GLRI. We recognize that there is a multitude of ways to benefit imperiled species conservation.

 

The following criteria must be satisfied for a proposal to be considered for funding:

 

(1) The project must involve voluntary conservation efforts within the Great Lakes Watershed boundary of the United States. As a voluntary program, we will not grant funding for projects that serve to satisfy regulatory requirements of the Act, including complying with a biological opinion under section 7 of the Act or fulfilling commitments of a Habitat Conservation Plan under section 10 of the Act, or for projects that serve to satisfy other local, State, or Federal regulatory requirements (e.g., mitigation for local, State, or Federal permits).

 

(2) The project must benefit species listed as endangered or threatened under the Act by the Service, species proposed or designated as candidates for listing by the Service, or
other at-risk species that are native to the United States portion of the Great Lakes watershed (Table 1). We may fund the acquisition of real property either through fee title or easements, however these will be ranked lower.

 

(3) If the project is submitted on behalf of a group of landowners, the proposal must either identify at least some of the specific landowners who have confirmed their intent to participate in the conservation efforts or provide other information to demonstrate that the project, if funded, would have full landowner participation.

 

(4) The proposal must include a reasonably detailed budget indicating how the funding will be used and how each partner is contributing. The proposal must also indicate the time commitment for maintaining the project’s benefits. The total costs of a project consist of all allowable costs you incur, including the value of in-kind contributions, in accomplishing project objectives during the life of the project.

 

(5) The proposal must include quantifiable measures that can be used to evaluate the project's success. These quantifiable measures must be specific, clear, and provide demonstrable benefits to the target species such as increased habitat quantity or quality. The project proposal should specify in detail how the habitat quantity or quality will be improved (e.g., acres, species, etc.) and the anticipated use of that habitat by the target species (e.g., numbers, duration, etc.). Proposed methods of monitoring, evaluating, and reporting these measures in comparison to an initial baseline should also be included in the proposal.

 

(6) To qualify for cost-share points in the proposal evaluation process, the proposal must include specifics on the partners involved in the project. The cost share must come from sources other than the FWS-ES-GLRI.

 

IV. Application and Submission Information

1. Proposal Narrative

The narrative description of your project proposal should specifically address each of the eligibility criteria and each of the ranking factors. We recommend the following format for the project narrative –

 

(1) Title Page. You should list on the Title Page a project title, objectives, duration, summary of costs (amount of FWS-ES-GLRI funding needed and cost sharing), and contact information (name, address and phone number).

 

(2) Project Description. The project proposal must identify which species will benefit, how they will benefit, and describe the project’s significance to each target species (goals and objectives for the project). List all other sources of funding you have or are seeking for the project and any known Federal, State, Tribal, or local government programs or activities that this project would affect.

 

(3) Statement of work. The statement of work is an action plan of activities you will conduct during the period of the project. You must prepare a detailed narrative; fully describing the work you will perform to achieve the project goals and objectives. The narrative should respond to the following questions:

 

(a) What is the project design? What specific work, activities, and procedures will you undertake?

 

(b) Who will be responsible for carrying out the various activities? Describe how the project will be organized and managed. Identify the person(s) responsible for the project and other project participants.

 

(c) What are the project milestones? Each project should first clearly describe the baseline conditions as they exist prior to project implementation. List any milestones, describing the specific activities and associated time lines to conduct the scope of work. Describe the time lines in increments (e.g., month 1, month 2), rather than by specific dates.

 

(d) Specify the criteria and procedures proposed to evaluate the relative success or failure of a project in achieving its objectives.

 

(e) For what period of time will you commit to maintain the habitat improvements or other benefits from the project? Describe the steps you will take to ensure that the benefits of the project continue throughout this time period.

 

(4) Project Budget. You must submit a reasonably detailed budget for the project. The budget should indicate the breakdown of costs proposed to be funded through the FWSES- GLRI and other costs, through both cash and in-kind contributions. To support your project’s budget, also describe briefly the basis for estimating the value of the cost sharing derived from in-kind contributions.

 

(5) Supporting Documentation. You should include any relevant documents and additional information (maps, background documents) that will help us to understand the project and the problem/opportunity you seek to address. Reference the recovery plan action (for listed species) that you are planning to address when applicable.

 

2. Content and Form of Application

For general guidance on developing and writing grant proposals, see the CFDA Internet site at https://www.cfda.gov/downloads/CFDA_writing.pdf

 

The Service will accept either a hard copy or electronic submission of proposals. Electronic submissions must be saved in formats read by either Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat Reader. The project proposal is a narrative description of your project and one required Federal form. The ultimate size of the proposal will depend on its complexity, but we request that you attempt to minimize the size of the narrative description of the proposal. If you will need to submit an original proposal hard copy, it must not be permanently bound. Your project proposal must be received by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, BHW Federal Building, 1 Federal Drive, Fort Snelling, Minnesota 55111 (attn: Peter Fasbender) or peter_fasbender@fws.gov by March 22, 2010 to be considered for the initial project evaluation and selection. Subject to funding availability, proposals may be considered for funding until September 29, 2010.

 

For electronic application submission through the Grants.gov internet site (http://www.grants.gov/), you must follow all instructions provided by Grants.gov to ensure that your electronic application is received by March 22, 2010 to be considered in the initial request for proposals. We highly recommend applicants that intend to apply electronically through Grants.gov, begin the application process well in advance of the closing date for submission of applications. The application process through Grants.gov requires applicants complete a registration process and requires that all materials submitted are completely and accurately filled out.

 

The project proposal should also indicate whether partial funding of the project is practicable, and, if so, what specific portion(s) of the project could be implemented with what level of funding. A project proposal that is a part of a longer-term initiative will be considered; however, the proposed project’s objectives, benefits, and tasks must stand on their own, as there are no assurances that additional funding will be awarded in subsequent years for associated or complementary projects.

 

The Service, the Department of the Interior, and the Office of Management and Budget, have established requirements concerning Federal financial assistance. This includes established principles for determining which costs are allowable or eligible based on the type of applicant (see Table 3 in section VI.2 below). Your project proposal must comply with these requirements.

 

Federal Assistance Forms: Applicants must provide an Application for Federal Assistance, OMB form number SF424. This form is available from http://www.fedforms.gov or http://www.gsa.gov/forms/, at http://training.fws.gov/fedaid/toolkit/toolkit.pdf or from the Regional FWS-ES-GLRI coordinator. Applications without this completed form will not be considered.

 

3. Submission Dates and Times

To be eligible for the initial request for proposals, grant project proposals must be either received by the Regional Office program coordinator or submitted to the Grants.gov internet site by March 22, 2010. The proposals must be received by 5:00 pm. Proposals not received by this date and time may be reviewed and considered as eligible until September 29, 2010, or until project funds have been depleted. To confirm the receipt of your proposal you must contact the Regional Office program coordinator.

 

4. Intergovernmental Review

This funding opportunity is subject to Executive Order (EO) 12372 “Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.” Applicants should contact the Service’s Regional Office program coordinator and/or the State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) for Federal Executive Order 12372 to determine whether the application is subject to the State intergovernmental review process. The following States and Territories have designated SPOCs: Illinois, Michigan, and New York. A complete list of the names and addresses for the SPOCs may be found at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/spoc.html

 

5. Funding Restrictions

The proposal must indicate the time commitment for maintaining the project’s benefits. A project begins on the effective date of an award agreement between you and an authorized representative of the U.S. Government and ends on the date specified in the award. Accordingly, we cannot reimburse you for time that you expend or costs that you incur in developing a project or preparing the application, or in any discussions or negotiations you may have with us prior to the award. We will not accept such expenditures as part of your cost share. We will also not consider fees or profits as allowable costs in your application. The total costs of a project consist of all allowable costs you incur, including the value of in-kind contributions, in accomplishing project objectives during the life of the project.

 

The final exact amount of funds, the scope of work, and terms and conditions of a successful award will be determined in pre-award negotiations between the prospective recipient and the Service’s representatives. The prospective recipient will be asked to sign an agreement that specifies the project requirements, such as the cost share, the project design, the time commitment for maintaining the project’s benefits, and the reporting requirements, and that provides for Service access to the project area in order to check on its progress. In order to receive funding, prospective recipient will also need to provide assurances and certifications of compliance with other Federal requirements (for example see Standard Form 424-B and Department of the Interior form DI-2010 available at http://training.fws.gov/fedaid/toolkit/toolkit.pdf). The recipient is reimbursed based on the cost-sharing formula in the Agreement. An applicant should not initiate your project in expectation of FWS-ES-GLRI funding, nor should they purchase materials or begin work until such time as they receive the final grant award document signed by an authorized Service official.

 

V. Application Review Information

1. Criteria

Members of a review panel will individually score each proposal based on a set of ranking factors, which include (1) the number of endangered or threatened species, species proposed or candidates for such listing, and at-risk species that will benefit from the project; (2) the importance of the project to the conservation of those species, including the duration of the benefits, the magnitude of the benefits, and the urgency of the project; (3) the contribution of a non-federal cost share; and (4) other proposal merits, such as whether the project complements other conservation projects in the area, the project’s unique qualities, feasibility of the project, or any other appropriate justifications, including particular strengths in the above categories (e.g., extraordinary benefits). Due to the wide variety of project proposals that will likely be submitted, the scoring system must provide a relatively high degree of flexibility. Therefore, a scoring system that is relatively simple, but allows project proposals to be evaluated qualitatively as well as quantitatively is desired. The four ranking factors will be scored as described in Table 2 below.

 

Ranking Factor: Project Proposal
Assessment:
Number
of Points
(1) The number of federally listed, proposed,
candidate, or at-risk species that will directly benefit
from the project.
1 listed species
2 + listed species
1
2
(2) The importance of the project to the conservation
of the target species, including the duration of the
benefits, the magnitude of the benefits, and the
urgency of the project.
Qualitative 1 - 6
(3) The contribution of cost share: - 10-20% cost share
- 20-30% cost share
- 30-40% cost share
- >40% cost share
1
2
3
4
(4) Other Proposal Merits. Whether the project complements other projects in the area, the project’s unique qualities, feasibility of the project, or any other appropriate justifications, including particular strengths in the above categories (e.g., extraordinary benefits). Qualitative 0 - 3

 

2. Review and Selection Process Proposals will compete for funding.

A panel of representatives will assess the applications and make funding recommendations to the Service. The purpose of using the panels is to obtain individual advice on project selection from an array of interests involved with conservation efforts throughout the Great Lakes basin. The Service will use the individual panel member recommendations in selecting projects, although geographic distribution of projects, the amount of funding requested for a project compared with the total amount of funding available, and other such factors may also be considered. Partial funding of one or more projects, when practicable, may be considered. After reviewing the individual panel member recommendations and the other factors, the appropriate Service’s Manager’s will make funding selections.

 

3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

The Service anticipates making the initial award announcements for the fiscal year 2010 competition in April 2010.

 

VI. Award Administration Information

1. Award Notices

Awards will be announced through a regional press release and a letter to the award recipient notifying them of the selection for an award. This letter is not an authorization to begin performance. An applicant should not initiate a project in expectation of FWS-ES-GLRI funding, nor should they purchase materials or begin work until such time as they receive the final grant award document signed by an authorized Service official. Unsuccessful applicants will also be notified via telephone, electronic mail, or via a letter delivered through the postal mail. Those individuals or groups that wish to have this information withheld from the public, including the name of the applicant and location of the project MUST clearly state this within the proposal. Upon request the Service will withhold such information to the maximum extent of the law. However, applicants should be aware that applications submitted to the Service for consideration in the FWS-ES-GLRI are a matter of public record, and such information is subject to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

 

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

Listed in Table 3 below are the administrative requirements that will apply to your project if funded through the FWS-ES-GLRI. The documents listed below establish principles for determining which costs are allowable or eligible (“cost principles”) and describe other requirements that apply to receiving FWS-ES-GLRI funding. These requirements apply to recipients and subrecipients of FWS-ES-GLRI funding. In some cases, the requirements vary depending upon the type of organization receiving the funding or that is a subrecipient of the funding. For projects that are selected for funding, we will also offer additional technical assistance to facilitate the prospective recipients’ understanding of the financial requirements.

 

On June 27, 2003, The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) published a Federal Register notice (68 FR 38402) that announced final policy issuance on the use of a universal identifier by grant applicants. The policy requires applicants applying for Federal grants or cooperative agreements on or after October 1, 2003 to acquire a Data Universal Number System (DUNS) number. It is the responsibility of the organization seeking Federal funds to obtain a DUNS, as necessary. Grant and cooperative agreement applicants (excluding individuals) need to ensure they have a DUNS number. Therefore, private individual landowners submitting proposals for consideration DO NOT need to acquire a DUNS number, however, organizations representing private landowners MUST acquire a DUNS number to be submitted with the proposal. Organizations can receive a DUNS number at no cost by calling the dedicated toll-free DUNS number request line at 1-866-705-5711 or online at www.dnb.com.

 

Table 3. Administrative Requirements for FWS-ES-GLRI Funding Awards

Category: Specific Requirements:

Individuals, private firms, and other nonprofits excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-122

* Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 31.2
* 43 CFR 18 (New Restrictions on Lobbying)
* 48 CFR 31 (Contracts with Commercial Organizations)

Non-Profit Organizations covered under OMB Circular No. A-122

* 43 CFR 12 (Administrative and Audit Requirements and Cost Principles for Assistance Programs)

* 43 CFR 18 (New Restrictions on Lobbying)

* OMB Circular No. A-110 (Administrative Requirements for Grants)

* OMB Circular No. A-122 (Cost Principles)

* OMB Circular No. A-133 (Audits)

Educational Institutions (even if part of a State or local government)

* 43 CFR 12 (Administrative and Audit Requirements and Cost
Principles for Assistance Programs)

* 43 CFR 18 (New Restrictions on Lobbying)

* OMB Circular No. A-21 (Cost Principles)

* OMB Circular No. A-110 (Administrative Requirements for Grants)

* OMB Circular No. A-133 (Audits)

States, local governments, and
Indian Tribes

* 43 CFR 12 (Administrative and Audit Requirements and Cost
Principles for Assistance Programs)

* 43 CFR 18 (New Restrictions on Lobbying)

* OMB Circular No. A-87 (Cost Principles)

* OMB Circular No. A-102 (Grants and Cooperative
Agreements)

 

3. Reporting

Grant recipients may be required to complete one or more of the following financial forms:

  • SF - 269/269A, Financial Status Report
  • SF - 270, Request for Advance or Reimbursement
  • SF - 271, Outlay Report and Request for Reimbursement for Construction Programs
  • SF - 272, Federal Cash Transactions Report.

Financial and performance reports are due upon project completion if performance is less than one year, and annually, and upon completion if the period of performance is greater than one year. Recipients will also be responsible for adhering to OMB Circular A-133, regarding single audit requirements.

 

Applicants are advised to work with the appropriate Regional Office program contacts to determine if any additional reporting requirements must be met based on individual applicant status following the administrative requirements as outlined in Table 3. Please note that additional information describing predicted and/or final resource outcomes for projects selected for funding through this RFP may be required at a later date (due to funding requirements of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative).

 

Delinquent submittal or non-submittal of reports will be construed by the Service as a failure by the grantee to accomplish objectives and may be grounds for withholding payments; suspending or terminating the award; and barring the recipient from receiving future awards from the Service until the delinquent reports are received.

 

VII. Agency Contacts

Please refer to following program contacts:

 

- In Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan or Ohio - Peter Fasbender, BHW Federal Building, 1 Federal Drive, Fort Snelling, Minnesota 55111, 612/713-5343, or peter_fasbender@fws.gov.

 

-Within Pennsylvania and New York, contact David Stilwell, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New York Field Office, 3817 Luker Road, Cortland, NY 13045, 607/753-9335, ext. 123, or david_stilwell@fws.gov.

 

VIII. Other Information

Please note that the Federal Government is not obligated to make any awards as a result of this announcement, and only official Service grant officers can bind the Government to the expenditure of funds. Please be aware that if you are selected as a Federal grant recipient, the funds you receive may be subject to Federal and other taxes.

 

 

Last updated: June 30, 2014