Chicago Ecological Services Field Office

Midwest Region

 

Chicago Field Office

1250 S. Grove, Suite 103
Barrington, IL 60010

Phone: 847/381-2253
FAX: 847/381-2285
TTY: 1-800-877-8339
(Federal Relay)

e-mail: Chicago@fws.gov

 


Connect With Us


 

Facebook icon

FaceBook

Flickr icon

Flickr

RSS

RSS

Twitter icon

Twitter

Blogger icon

Blog

YouTube icon

YouTube

 


 

Links to Whooping Crane Sighting Report Form
Buy Duck Stamps icon Endangered Species Day icon

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative logo

Leafy Prairie-Clover (Dalea foliosa)

Leafy prairie clover

 

Listed as endangered in 1991.

 

 

  • Final rule listing the species, published in The Federal Register (56 FR 19953-19959), May 1, 1991.

 

 

This plant occurs in dry prairies in Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama. Habitat destruction and grazing effects are believed to have caused declines. It was listed as endangered in 1991.

 

The largest known remaining populations of this species are located in dolomite prairie communities in northeast Illinois. The Chicago Illinois Field Office is the lead office for coordinating the Service's efforts to recover this species within the Great Lakes-Big Rivers Region. Nationally, we work with the Cookeville, Tennessee Field Office to address conservation and recovery needs of this species. We also regularly attend meetings of the Leafy Prairie- Clover Recovery Team.

Historical Records for this Species in Northeast Illinois are available from Cook, DuPage, and Will counties.

 

Locally, we work with the U.S. Forest Service Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and several local agency partners to consider measures to conserve remaining populations of this species. We also consult with local species experts, and others with an interest in managing or recovering this species.

 

In 2006, we coordinated a proposal to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for recovery of this species in Illinois. The grant will fund habitat restoration and lead to captive propagation of this species so it could be reintroduced into suitable, but currently unoccupied, habitat within it's historic range in the state.


 


 

Chicago Endangered Species Home

Chicago Field Office Home

 


 
Last updated: November 7, 2013