Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge
Southeast Region
Map of the Southeast Region Map of Kentucky Map of the Caribbean and Navassa Map of North Carolina Map of Tennessee Map of South Carolina Map of Arkansas Map of Louisiana Map of Mississippi Map of Alabama Map of Georgia Map of Florida

Welcome to Lower Suwannee NWR

American alligator. Credit: USFWS

American alligator. Credit: USFWS

 

Nesting egret. Credit: USFWS

Nesting egret. Credit: USFWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 53,000 acre Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1979 to protect one of the largest undeveloped river-delta estuarine systems in the United States. The constant influx of nutrients from the river combined with numerous off-shore islands and tidal creeks create excellent wildlife habitat. Swallow-tailed kites, bald eagles, West Indian manatees, Gulf sturgeon, whitetailed deer, and eastern wild turkeys are but a few of the wildlife species that inhabit the Refuge. Natural salt marshes, tidal flats, bottomland hardwood swamps, and pine forests provide habitat for thousands of creatures – both large and small.

The Refuge offers recreational and educational activities for everyone. Bird and wildlife observation, wildlife photography, fishing, paddling, hunting, and interpretive walks are all available. Several boardwalks and observation towers offer unique views of Refuge wildlife and habitat.

The links to the left offer a vide variety of information on the Refuge. We encourage you to explore these links then come explore your Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge.

 

Sign stating that the refuge is open from sunrise to sunset. Access prohibited after dark, except during refuge hunts.

Refuge Night Closure

These informative signs will soon be seen on the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Our local Refuge is one of the last of the 561 National Wildlife Refuges to close its gates after dark. This night-time closure provides the wildlife with a recuperative time from steady vehicular traffic and human visitation. The result will be a higher quality wildlife viewing experience to Refuge visitors. Night closures also simplify our law enforcement and emergency response efforts and costs. Special use permits can also be applied for by the public for activities that require access to the refuge during closed hours. Open hours will be longer during hunting seasons. In Dixie County, the Dixie Mainline and the Willey Locker Mainline, will remain open for through traffic. Shired Island will be open for boat traffic while refuge lands will be closed. Questions can be directed to refuge staff at telephone 352-493-0238 or to put forth your comments to management, email to: Lowersuwannee@fws.gov.

Last updated: January 18, 2013