Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge
Pacific Region
 

Hunting

Young white-tailed deer buck

Young white-tailed deer Photo Credit: USFWS

The Refuge covers 41,568 acres in GMU 117, and supports a wide array of wildlife. White-tailed deer, wild turkey, and grouse are the species most commonly hunted. The Refuge is a winter range for white-tailed deer, and during the early season most of the deer are still down in the valley or at higher elevations. Mule deer, elk, moose, and bear are scattered and relatively uncommon. Waterfowl hunting is allowed on all the lakes and ponds, but all streams are closed to waterfowl hunting. Trapping is not permitted.

Some hunting seasons open September 1. See our Hunting brochure for more information and our 2013 Hunting Seasons brochure (available in September 2013) for specific seasons. See Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife hunting pamphlets for information on state regulations.

Land and Weather

Various terrain and wildlife habitats include small fields, numerous creeks and steep wooded hillsides up to 5,600 feet in elevation. Map and compass use is recommended. The USGS maps that include the Refuge are: Addy Mt., Cliff Ridge, Calispell Peak, Park Rapids, Lake Gillette, and a tiny portion of Timber Mt. Our weather is variable. The areas around headquarters may be overcast while higher elevations are getting a few inches of snow. Weather is difficult to predict and can change quickly.

There are numerous in holdings (privately owned land) within the Refuge boundary. It is the hunter’s responsibility to know their location.

The Refuge is a winter range for white-tailed deer, and during the early season most of the deer are still down in the valley or at higher elevations. Mule deer, elk, moose, and bear are scattered and relatively uncommon. Waterfowl hunting is allowed on all the lakes and ponds, but all streams are closed to waterfowl hunting. Trapping is not permitted.

While hunting, please help us keep the Refuge clean and safe for all visitors.

Regulations

There are safety zones one-quarter mile around the Refuge Headquarters and buildings, and established campgrounds where no shooting is allowed. Target shooting is not permitted.

Harvest Information Requested

To help monitor populations, the Refuge biologist collects harvest information on deer and grouse. Deer can be brought to Refuge headquarters to be weighed, measured, and have a tooth removed. The tooth aids in determining the age and health of the deer. Grouse wing barrels are set up at the main entrances. Deposit one wing clipped from your harvested bird which allows us to determine the age and species. Your cooperation is appreciated.

Camping is allowed on the Refuge. Established campgrounds have new vault toilets and metal fire rings. Dispersed camping is allowed at designated hunt camp sites from October 1 through December 31. See our Public Use Information brochure for more information.

Last updated: January 28, 2013