Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Recovery Plan
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FAQs

En Español

1. What is a recovery plan?
2. What is the Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle Recovery Plan’s history?

3. Why is the plan being revised?
4. How is the 2nd draft revision likely to differ from its predecessor?
5.
Who develops the recovery plan?
6.
Do stakeholders and members of the general public have input into the plan’s recovery goals, criteria, and action items?
7.
Is the recovery plan part of the Services’ other regulatory activities, such as section 7 consultations with Federal agencies?
8.
How do I add my name to the contact list for information on future actions related to loggerhead turtle recovery planning?
9. Where can I find more information about sea turtles?


Please send comments on our web site, general questions, or requests for special assistance to the Kemp's Ridley Recovery Team by emal to: kempsridley@fws.gov.

Frequently Asked Questions for the Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Recovery Plan

2nd Revision


Q1: What is a recovery plan?

A1: A recovery plan provides information on the management and research activities related to recovery of an endangered or threatened species. It serves as a road map for species recovery by laying out where to go and how to get there. Primarily, a recovery plan: (1) delineates those aspects of the species’ biology, life history, and threats that are pertinent to its endangerment and recovery; (2) outlines and justifies a recovery strategy; (3) identifies the actions necessary to support recovery of the species; and (4) identifies goals and criteria by which to measure progress. The information included in a recovery plan provides a framework of actions for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and their partners and a federally listed species and its habitat recover the species so that its population is self-sustaining and no longer needs protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Q2: What is the Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle Recovery Plan’s history?


A2: An initial recovery plan for the Kemp’s ridley turtle was approved on September 19, 1984. This initial plan was a multi-species plan for all six species of sea turtles occurring in the U.S. On August 21, 1992, a separate recovery plan for the of the Kemp’s ridley turtle was approved. In 2001, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (collectively referred to as the Services), which share regulatory jurisdiction for sea turtles, initiated the process to revise the Kemp’s ridley plan for a second time. A 12-member Kemp’s ridley Recovery Team, consisting of species experts, was established to draft this revision. The first meeting of the new team was held in October 2002.

Q3: Why is the plan being revised?


A3: The Services regularly review recovery plans to ensure the most current information is being considered in our actions to recover listed species and to incorporate changes in our plans, where appropriate. Since approval of the first revised plan in 1992, significant research has been accomplished and important conservation and recovery activities have been undertaken. As a result, we have a greater knowledge of the species and its status. These advances in our understanding of the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle make a second revision of the recovery plan necessary.

Q4: How is the 2nd draft revision likely to differ from its predecessor?


A4: In this revision, the Services will identify and consider new information and important conservation and recovery activities that have been undertaken since the 1992 plan was approved. Additionally, great care will be taken in this revision to provide what we believe are "objective, measurable criteria" that, when met, would result in a determination that the species be removed from the list of threatened and endangered species. Most importantly this version of the recovery team will not only be developed bi-nationally with Mexico, but it will be approved and signed by the Directora General de Vida Silvestre, Secretaria de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales along with National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Q5: Who develops the recovery plan?


A5: A 12 member bi-national Kemp’s Ridley Turtle Recovery Team made up of species experts is assisting the Services in drafting this revision. Recovery team members are:

Mr. Earl Possardt (Co-Team Leader),U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Sr. Oscar Ramirez (Co=Team Leader), Vida Silvestre, SEMARNAT
Ms Therese Conant, National Marine Fisheries Service
Dr. Patrick Burchfield, Gladys Porter Zoo
Dr. Donna Shaver, U.S. National Park Service
Dr. Laura Sarti, CONANP
Ms. Sheryan Epperly, National Marine Fisheries Service
Mr. Les Hodgson, National Fisheries Institute
Sra. Gloria Tavera, Estado de Tamaulipas, SEDUE
Dr. David W. Owens, Grice Marine Lab, College of Charleston
Mr. Michael Ray, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
Mr Tom Shearer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Q6: Do stakeholders and members of the general public have input into the plan’s recovery goals, criteria, and action items?


A6: Yes, we will be seeking stakeholder, scientific peer review, and general public input and comment on the plan in several ways. In accordance with the ESA, a formal opportunity for public review and comment is required for all new and revised recovery plans, and input received during this period must be considered prior to completion and approval of the plan. Once a revised plan has been drafted, a Notice of Availability of a Draft Recovery Plan for Review and Comment will be published in the Federal Register with a 60-day period for formal public review. To ensure recovery plans are based on the best scientific information and judgment, our policy also requires the Services to solicit independent peer review on recovery plans from appropriate local, State, and Federal agencies; Tribal governments; academic and scientific groups and individuals; and/or any other party that may possess pertinent information.

In addition to these requirements for seeking formal public comment and scientific peer review, the Services believe it is necessary to involve stakeholders early in the process both by sharing information on the plan’s development and by seeking input when the draft plan is published

To further involve stakeholders in the planning process, in April 2004 the recovery team will be holding informational meetings with representatives of several stakeholders groups to discuss major threats to the species, as well as stakeholder concerns, and to identify, where possible, how a collaborative approach might provide a potential solution to the identified threats and concerns. To ensure compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the recovery team will be seeking stakeholder input on an individual basis rather than seeking recommendations from a group as a whole. We also will be making information available to stakeholders through informational mailings and other communication avenues as appropriate.

Q7: Is the recovery plan part of the Services’ other regulatory activities, such as section 7 consultations with Federal agencies?


A7: A recovery plan is a guidance document; not a regulatory document. The ESA clearly envisions a recovery plan as the central organizing tool for guiding the Services and their partners in efforts to recover a species. While the regulatory actions the Services may pursue are independent of the recovery plan, they do serve as management tools in implementing the actions set forth in the plan.

Q8: How do I add my name to the contact list for information on future actions related to the Kemp's ridley sea turtle recovery planning?


A8: Visit the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s web site at http://kempsridley.fws.gov, e-mail your request to kempsridley@fws.gov, or call us at 1-361-994-9005 to be added the contact list or to request more information.

Q9: Where can I find more information about sea turtles?


A9: Visit the NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service at: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/prot_res/PR3/Turtles/turtles.html
and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s at: http://northflorida.fws.gov/SeaTurtles/seaturtle-info.htm

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the National Marine Fisheries Service, provides this information to keep Stakeholders in the Kemp’s ridley recovery planning effort up-to-date on the status of the plan's revision. This site will be updated frequently, so please check back often to see what's new.

Updated: March 15, 2010