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Publications and Fact Sheets - Multinationational Species Conservation Funds

Image of the first page of the semipostal stamp fact sheet

Save Vanishing Species Stamp

Only the fourth of its kind, this stamp is now available in post offices nationwide and will remain on sale for at least two years. President Obama recently signed the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Act of 2010, providing an opportunity for the public to support USFWS’ mission to save imperiled species globally.

Proceeds from stamp sales will support conservation efforts directed at targeted endangered species worldwide that are of great importance to the American public and authorized by specific legislation.

Learn more about the Save Vanishing Species Stamp and how it directly conservation programs supported by USFWS

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the Rhino Tiger Conservation Fund fact sheet

Tiger

Tigers and are magnificent creatures: big, powerful, and charismatic. Unfortunately, these same qualities make them popular targets; rhino and tiger body parts are in high demand on the global black market. Tiger organs and bones and rhino horns are used in Asian medicines, which are sold to consumers who believe these animal products convey strength, health and virility. The tiger’s beautiful orange pelt commands a high price and also fall victim to poachers’ snares, set to trap other animals for bushmeat or trophies.

Learn more about the Tiger conservation programs supported by USFWS

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the African Elephant Conservation Fund fact sheet

African Elephant

In the last century, rampant ivory poaching and habitat loss caused African elephant numbers to drop from over ten million animals in 1900 to fewer than 500,000 by the late 1980’s. Uncontrolled hunting for ivory and meat, and loss of habitat continue to threaten the African elephant today. In addition to the ivory and bushmeat trades, the loss of natural elephant habitat and the resulting conflict between elephants and humans threaten elephant survival throughout Africa. As human populations grow and expand into remote areas, natural habitat is cleared and destroyed to make way for agriculture. Elephant populations are compressed into smaller ranges with limited food and water supplies. Hungry elephants may wander into villages and damage crops. People often kill elephants in an attempt to stop the crop raids and people are also sometimes killed trying to fend off elephants.

Learn more about the African Elephant conservation programs supported by USFWS

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the Rhino Tiger Conservation Fund fact sheet

Rhinoceros

Rhinos and are magnificent creatures: big, powerful, and charismatic. Unfortunately, these same qualities make them popular targets; rhino and tiger body parts are in high demand on the global black market. Rhino horns are also carved for dagger handles as a coveted status symbol in the Middle East. The illegal trade in animal parts is a profitable business and the demand for these products creates an ongoing temptation for poachers. Rhinos and tigers also fall victim to poachers’ snares, set to trap other animals for bushmeat or trophies.

Learn more about the Rhinoceros conservation programs supported by USFWS.

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the Asian Elephant Conservation Fund fact sheet

Asian Elephant

In the United States, Asian elephants are best known as familiar circus attractions. Yet throughout their homeland, captive elephants are primarily beasts of burden. An estimated 16,000 Asian elephants are presently tamed and used for timber harvest, clearing forests and agricultural development. Ironically, it is the destruction of forests, the advancement of agriculture, and the encroachment of human civilization that pose the greatest threats to the survival of Asia’s wild elephants.

Learn more about the Asian Elephants conservation programs supported by USFWS

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the Great Ape Conservation Fund fact sheet

Great Ape

Apes, by their nature, are extremely vulnerable. They occur at very low densities, grow relatively slowly, are long-lived, have low reproductive rates and complex social relationships. Today, all the world’s great ape species are threatened with extinction.Apes are susceptible to many of the same diseases as humans. As growing human populations penetrate further into ape habitat, the potential for disease transmission between apes and people, and vice versa, is increasing. As a result, the bushmeat trade poses a serious health risk for humans.

Learn more about the Great Ape conservation programs supported by USFWS

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Image of the first page of the Marine Turtle Conservation Act 2006-2011 Report

New!  Marine Turtle Conservation Act

The USFWS has the privilege of administering and implementing the Marine Turtle Conservation Act to support on-the-ground conservation initiatives on behalf of the world’s imperiled marine turtles. This report highlights the Wildlife Without Borders Marine Turtle Conservation Fund, emphasizing fiscal years 2005-2010.

Learn more about the Marine Turtle conservation programs supported by USFWS

Download the report here (pdf - NOTE: large file, 7 MB)

Image of the first page of the Marine Turtle Conservation Fund fact sheet

Marine Turtle

Marine turtles are truly the ancient mariners of the world’s oceans with ancestors dating back over 100 million years. Seven species of marine turtles currently navigate the oceans. While all species require tropical, subtropical or temperate oceanic beaches for nesting, each has specific marine habitat and feeding requirements. All marine turtle species except the flatback are also listed as endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Learn more about the Marine Turtle conservation programs supported by USFWS

Project Summaries (pdf)

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

First page of the 2011 Species Funding update from Wildlife Without Borders

New!  2011 Funding

In 2011, the Multinational Species Conservation Funds awarded 201 grants, out of 411 proposals received, for a total of $11,529,454 in grant funding to conserve African elephants, rhinos, tigers, Asian elephants, great apes, marine turtles, and the landscapes in which they live. This was bolstered by $17,352,034 in matching funds, nearly tripling the impact of the grant funding.

Learn more about the Multinational Species Conservation Funds administered by USFWS

Download the fact sheet here (pdf)

Last updated: January, 21, 2011
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