Pair of male African lions. Credit: Heidi Ruffler / USFWS

Service Helps Make Atlantic Coast Stronger After Hurricane Sandy

October 29, 2014
Two years ago today, Hurricane Sandy made landfall, devastating communities along the Atlantic Coast. With $167 million in federal recovery funding, the Fish and Wildlife Service is cleaning up and repairing damaged wildlife refuges, strengthening and restoring beaches, marshes and other natural defenses that sustain wildlife and protect communities, and developing science to better understand and predict impacts to these natural areas.
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 Florida softshell turtle. Credit: Gabriel Kamener / Creative Commons

Florida softshell turtle. Credit: Gabriel Kamener / Creative Commons

Service Proposes Trade Protections for Four Native Freshwater Turtles

October 29, 2014
A booming international trade in turtles has put pressure on populations across the country and has led to concern about the long-term survival of several species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a proposed rule to address the growing threat of illegal take and trade in native turtles. If finalized, this action will bring four native freshwater turtle species – the common snapping turtle, the Florida softshell turtle, the smooth softshell turtle and the spiny softshell turtle – under the protection of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
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Pair of male African lions. Credit: Heidi Ruffler / USFWS

Service Proposes Endangered Species Act Protection for the African Lion

October 27, 2014
Following a review of the best available scientific information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed listing the African lion as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The agency’s analysis found that lions are in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future. African lions are still found across a large range in Africa, but about 70 percent of the current African lion population exists in only 10 major strongholds. “The African lion – a symbol of majesty, courage and strength – faces serious threats to its long-term survival. Listing it as a threatened species will bring the full protections of U.S. law to lion conservation, allowing us to strengthen enforcement and monitoring of imports and international trade,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe. “It is up to all of us, not just the people of Africa, to ensure that healthy, wild populations continue to roam the savannah for generations to come.”
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