Hurricane Sandy Recovery
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Clean-up in progress - USFWS.
Beach restoration complete at Delaware Bay

PHOTO: Moore’s Beach, New Jersey, a critical habitat for native horseshoe crabs and migratory bird populations that was badly eroded by Hurricane Sandy, after restoration with more than 18,000 cubic yards of new sand.May 1, 2014 – In less than a month’s time, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, working with local contractors and partner organizations, have replenished five beaches along the Delaware Bay that were badly eroded by Hurricane Sandy. The $1.65 million habitat restoration project, which benefits both native horseshoe crabs and migrating shorebirds, will also provide increased protection from storm surge and sea-level rise to local communities and infrastructure from Moore’s Beach to Pierces Point. More than 30,000 cubic yards or 45,000 tons of locally mined sand were trucked onto the beaches to rebuild the two to three feet of shoreline eroded in the storm. Post-restoration surveys will be conducted at three and six months by the Stockton College Coastal Research Center, to help derive a long-term maintenance and management plan for the beach habitat from radar mapping of sand movement throughout the bay area.

View the press release
View photos of the beach restorations
Learn more about the importance of Delaware Bay beach habitats
Media Coverage: read more about the completion of beach restoration
PHOTO: Moore’s Beach, New Jersey, a critical habitat for native horseshoe crabs and migratory bird populations that was badly eroded by Hurricane Sandy, after restoration with more than 18,000 cubic yards of new sand (Click photo for before/after image)
Credits: Tom Sturm/USFWS; Dianne Daly/American Littoral Society


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Last updated: October 28, 2014