Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge - USFWS

Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

Location: Oceanville, NJ


Resilience Outline Resilience Projects Recovery Icon Recovery Projects

Resil Shield

Project: Restoring Coastal Marshes in National Wildlife Refuges

Location: New Jersey

Project Type: Resilience

Funding: $15,000,000

Project Summary

Increase protection of communities along 60 miles of coastal New Jersey by supporting and strengthening natural buffers. Restore and enhance salt marshes as critical natural defenses which support the communities, and protect the associated social, economic and recreational values of the New Jersey shore.

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Resil Shield

Project: A Stronger Coast - Three USFWS Northeast Region National Wildlife Refuge Projects to Increase Coastal Resilience and Preparedness

Location: Regional

Project Type: Resilience

Funding: $2,060,000

Project Summary

The three projects included in this study are intended to identify vulnerabilities and strengths of over 70 miles of shoreline at coastal refuges, assess the integrity of over 30,000 acres of coastal marsh that protect adjacent shorelines and help preserve the species they support.

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Recovery hammer

Project: Remove Debris and Repair Trails

Project Type: Recovery

Funding: $19,142,500

Project Summary

This project will remove debris and downed trees from Hurricane Sandy-impacted areas at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, and repair damages to visitor facilities.

Conservation / Restoration Goals

  • Clean up coastal debris from 22 miles of New Jersey coastline
  • Repair facilities to restore staff and visitor access

Project Benefits

  • Restores staff and visitor access
  • Mitigates public safety concerns
  • Restores/preserves wildlife habitat on 47,000-acre refuge

Additional Details

Storm surge from Hurricane Sandy washed over the entire refuge, scattering debris and hazardous materials along a 22-mile stretch of beach and in marshes and forests. Water severely damaged trails, stream crossings, and viewing platforms and left boats, building remains, dock timbers, household chemicals, propane tanks, construction debris, and gas cans in coastal marshes, streams and wooded areas, creating unsafe conditions for refuge visitors and harming wildlife habitat. The USFWS will survey debris and remove it using specialized equipment that reduces harm to sensitive wildlife habitat. Repair/construction crews will fix trail surfaces, viewing platforms, and stream crossings at the deCamp Wildlife Trail, Leeds Eco-trail, and Barnegat Platform; build a walkway to protect Reedy Creek; replace 45 feet of boardwalk and build a paved parking pad and apron at Barnegat Platform to allow wheelchair access. Materials will be recycled whenever possible and restoration of wildlife habitat will follow debris removal.


Recovery hammer

Project: Provide Backup Power - Generator, Solar and Electrical Improvements

Project Type: Recovery

Funding: $686,594

Project Summary

This project will provide backup and solar photovoltaic power to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge.

Conservation / Restoration Goals

  • Supply reliable ancillary power sources to FWS buildings
  • Utilize renewable (solar) electrical systems where possible

Project Benefits

  • Ensures reliable backup power to facilities during emergency outages
  • Reduces annual utility bills for FWS facilities, saving taxpayer dollars
  • Reduces FWS facilities' carbon footprints

Additional Details

This project is one of many regionally planned electrical upgrades to facilities at National Wildlife Refuges and other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stations. Hurricane Sandy and previous storms have knocked out power to headquarters, visitor centers, maintenance buildings, staff housing and supporting structures including garages and visitor restrooms. Outages have damaged sensitive electronic equipment, disabled heating and cooling and resulted in burst frozen water pipes. Equipping buildings with backup generators will enable them to weather outages more effectively and serve as resources for their communities for communications and emergency coordination efforts. In addition, stations equipped with photovoltaic solar panels will see their dependency on off-site power grids reduced or eliminated. Solar power systems will also reduce facilities' carbon footprints and save taxpayer dollars through reduced utility bills.


Recovery hammer

Project: Fix Refuge Dikes and Roads and Restore Wildlife Habitat

Project Type: Recovery

Funding: $169,600

Project Summary

This project will repair and/or rebuild three dikes on the refuge and roads that traverse them.

Conservation / Restoration Goals

  • Restore water impoundments and associated habitat for migratory birds
  • Restore staff and visitor access

Project Benefits

  • Restores staff and visitor access to popular Wildlife Drive
  • Mitigates public safety concerns
  • Restores habitat for Atlantic brant, American black ducks and other shorebirds

Additional Details

Many birds, including large numbers of Atlantic brant and American black ducks, rely on refuge water impoundments for habitat. Hurricane Sandy eroded large portions of the Cross Dike, Short Dike, and exterior dike, washing material into impoundments and destroying water control structures. The exterior dike is part of the refuge's popular Wildlife Drive. The deposited material harms important wildlife habitat and offers a chance for invasive, non-native plant species to grow. Restorations will repair 4,700 feet of roadway and replace a 45-foot-long, four-foot-diameter drainage pipe on the Cross Dike; fix 1,500 feet of roadway on the Short Dike; replace eroded banks on both dikes, as well as the exterior dike; remove eroded material from impoundments and use it to improve wildlife habitat elsewhere, if possible, and replace a damaged vehicle counter at one refuge entrance.

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Forsythe Resilience Project Map


Forsythe Recovery Project Map


E.B. Forsythe Cleaup Photos

 

 

Last updated: July 29, 2014