Building a Stronger Coast
Massachusetts project restores native salt marsh, offering coastal flooding protection near Cape Cod

Staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assess a clogged inlet at an old culvert scheduled to be replaced this fall to restore natural marsh.

January 2, 2014 - Communities near Round Hill salt marsh in Dartmouth, Massachusetts will benefit from an 11.6 acre salt marsh restoration project along the southeast coast near Cape Cod. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investing $2.2 million to restore the tidal flow near the 70-acre Meadow Shores Marsh, in part by replacing the defunct wooden culvert beneath Ray Peck Drive as shown in the featured photos. The salt marshes act as a buffer against coastal flooding during severe storms, which helps protect nearby communities. The project is expected to begin this fall, supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery.

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Staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assess a clogged inlet at an old culvert scheduled to be replaced this fall to restore natural marsh. Credit: Lia McLaughlin/USFWS


#StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Dismal Swamp

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Dismal Swamp

January 7, 2015 - The Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge encompasses more than 112,000 acres of contiguous forest located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. It is home to some of the most important wildlife habitat in the mid-Atlantic region, visited by more than 200 species of birds and a variety of reptiles and mammals, including otter, bat, red fox, white-tailed deer and bobcat. Learn how federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery is supporting a water management project led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will help reduce impacts of floods and wildfire on wildlife and communities such as Chesapeake and Suffolk, Virginia along the refuge.

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More about the Hurricane Sandy Great Dismal Swamp restoration project
View photos of restoration work in Great Dismal Swamp
VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Dismal Swamp. Credit: USFWS


Nearly 600 tons in 2.5 months: Final phase of Post-Sandy cleanup effort continues along the Jersey Shore

A large recreational boat, one of the many items blown into the E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, was removed as crews return the Jersey shoreline to pre-storm conditions this winter.

December 24, 2014 - The second and final phase of a multimillion-dollar debris cleanup at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge continues in southern New Jersey’s Barnegat and Stafford Townships, retrieving large debris items including recreational boats, docks, boardwalks and oil tanks, resulting from 2012’s Hurricane Sandy. Nearly 600 tons of debris were extracted from refuge marshes since clean up began. As during the first phase, all debris must be handpicked, relying on specialized equipment to minimize damage to the salt marsh. Crews are expected to complete the project by spring 2015.

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More about Hurricane Sandy funded Forsythe Refuge restoration projects


A large recreational boat, one of the many items blown into the E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, was removed as crews return the Jersey shoreline to pre-storm conditions this winter. Credit: Donjon Marine, Inc.


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Last updated: January 7, 2015