Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
Two Years After Sandy: Building a Stronger Coast in the Communities of the Great Marsh

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Marsh

October 28, 2014 - This fall, the Service launched the second in a series of videos by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service highlighting communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy and their journey toward recovery. This video highlights communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy and their journey toward recovery, describing how partners are working together in the Massachusetts North Shore to protect communities from storms and flooding by strengthening the natural barriers along the coast.

View the video
More about the Hurricane Sandy Great Marsh restoration project
View photos of coastal restoration work in the Great Marsh

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Marsh Credit: USFWS


Two Years After Sandy: Building a Stronger Coast in Middle Township, New Jersey

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Featured Community: Middle Township, NJ. Credit: USFWS

October 27, 2014 - This summer, the Service launched the first in a series of videos highlighting communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy and their journey toward recovery. This first video outlines a $1.65 million beach habitat restoration project along the shores of Delaware Bay that will benefit native horseshoe crabs and migrating shorebirds. At the same time, the project will help local communities like Middle Township, New Jersey, whose Mayor Tim Donohue describes how strengthening natural defenses will in turn protect homes and support the area's ecotourism industry.

View the video
Read about netting and tagging red knots on Delaware Bay
View photos of red knots, horseshoe crabs and beach habitats

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Featured Community: Middle Township, NJ. Credit: USFWS


Saving the Salt Marsh, Protecting Coastal Communities

Nick Ernst, Widlife Biologist for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Marci Cole Ekberg, Coastal Ecologist for Save the Bay, discuss marsh elevation at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in Rhode Island.

October 24, 2014 - Many U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service projects currently funded by Hurricane Sandy resilience investments, including marsh restorations in Delaware, New Jersey and a stretch from Rhode Island to southern Maine, focus on restoring sediment transport to help bolster healthy coastal marshes and enhance natural defenses that protect coastal communities and sustain people and wildlife. Susan Adamowicz, Land Management and Research Demonstration Biologist at Maine’s Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, acknowledges how Sandy resilience funding offers an opportunity to pursue solutions that can help return larger amounts of sediment to the coast and boost marsh elevation. “In these coastal ecosystems, it’s all about elevation, elevation, elevation,” says Adamowicz. Damaged and undersized culverts are being replaced where needed, and obsolete dams are likewise being evaluated for removal, including several in Maryland, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

View the blog post
View all Hurricane Sandy resilience and recovery projects


Nick Ernst, Widlife Biologist for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Marci Cole Ekberg, Coastal Ecologist for Save the Bay, discuss marsh elevation at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in Rhode Island. Credit: Tom Sturm/USFWS


Previous Next

More Stories

Connect with Us

Facebook Flickr Twitter Wordpress YouTube RSS

Restoration & Repair Videos


Hurricane Sandy Photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: October 28, 2014