Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
New Haven dam removal proceeding on schedule

PHOTO: The Pond Lily Dam in New Haven, Conn. was built in 1780 and has not been maintained for at least 30 years. Credit: Suzanne Paton/USFWS

June 6, 2014 - The 234-year-old Pond Lily Dam in New Haven, Conn. is on track to be removed this summer as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hurricane Sandy resilience and recovery effort.  The dam, while historic to the area, poses a danger of failure and has for decades contributed to storm-related flooding in upstream communities. Removal of the dam will help reduce flood risks both upstream and downstream; restore passage to migratory fish species; enhance riparian habitat; and improve upstream water quality. In addition, young volunteers from New Haven’s Solar Youth and the Common Ground school will be engaged in planting and adding trails to the site’s surrounding nature preserve. Supporting partners in the project include the Connecticut Fund for the Environment, Trout Unlimited, NOAA, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

View images of the dam
Read more about USFWS dam removal and aquatic connectivity projects


PHOTO: The Pond Lily Dam in New Haven, Conn. was built in 1780 and has not been maintained for at least 30 years.
Credit: Suzanne Paton/USFWS


Citizen science drives new tool to predict storm effects

PHOTO: Aerial photo of Mantoloking, New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy. Credit: Greg Thompson/USFWS

May 29, 2014 - Our Department of the Interior colleagues at the U.S. Geological Survey have launched a tool that encourages citizen scientists to engage in helping to predict the effects of future storms like Hurricane Sandy. The iCoast application asks volunteers to compare pre- and post-storm aerial photographs and identify coastal changes using predefined tags. Integrating this public input will help improve predictive models and educate people about the vulnerability of coastal communities to extreme storms. It will also help inform conservation efforts to protect wildlife and critical coastal habitats.

Read more about iCoast and learn how to register to contribute data analysis
View USFWS aerial photos of Hurricane Sandy damage


PHOTO: Aerial photo of Mantoloking, New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy.
Credit: Greg Thompson/USFWS


Service projects kick into gear as 2014 Hurricane Season arrives

PHOTO: Hurricane Sandy as it approached the U.S. in October 2012.

May 22, 2014 – With a new hurricane season beginning June 1, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues to help the Atlantic Coast rebuild since Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. This involves working with partners and communities to restore beaches, marshes and other natural areas that provide clean water, storm protection, wildlife habitat and recreational opportunities for the public. To date, the Service has cleaned up hundreds of tons of coastal debris and is moving forward with marsh and shoreline restoration projects to fight erosion and protect against flooding from storm surge. These and other projects will restore and enhance habitat for vulnerable species in the face of future storms, and provide the added benefit of protecting coastal communities and infrastructure.

Read more about Hurricane Sandy recovery and resilience projects around the region
View Hurricane Sandy cleanup photos


PHOTO: Hurricane Sandy as it approached the U.S. in October 2012. Credit: NASA


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Last updated: July 23, 2014