Building a Stronger Coast
Partners launch Restore Delaware Bay website

A new website offers information on restoration work in progress along New Jersey’s Delaware Bay.

February 4, 2015 - The American Littoral Society and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey have launched a new website describing how they are working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other partners to restore an ecologically healthy and resilient Delaware Bay region for wildlife and nearby communities. The site provides information on beach restoration, marsh restoration, oyster reefs, and monitoring along the Jersey coast, including various federally funded Hurricane Sandy projects.

Visit the Restore Delaware Bay website



A new website offers information on restoration work in progress along New Jersey’s Delaware Bay. Credit: American Littoral Society/Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey


Coastal Resilience Coordinator Megan Tyrell helps shore up science effort in response to climate change, Hurricane Sandy

Megan Tyrrell joins the the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative as a research coordinator for projects related to coastal resilience, including those funded by Hurricane Sandy recovery investments.

January 23, 2015 - With many coastal science projects underway over the next several years that will inform future conservation strategies to help build a stronger Atlantic coast in the face of climate change, a team of experts from federal to local partners are joining forces to ensure best outcomes. The newest addition to this team includes Megan Tyrrell, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative Coastal Resilience Coordinator. Tyrrell will be responsible for coordinating research projects, including Hurricane Sandy funded efforts underway to strengthen coastlines that provide wildlife habitat and protection from storm surge and wave erosion.

More about NALCC's new Coastal Resilience Coordinator



Megan Tyrrell joins the the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative as a research coordinator for projects related to coastal resilience, including those funded by Hurricane Sandy recovery investments.


Massachusetts project restores native salt marsh, offering coastal flooding protection near Cape Cod

Staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assess a clogged inlet at an old culvert scheduled to be replaced this fall to restore natural marsh.

January 2, 2014 - Communities near Round Hill salt marsh in Dartmouth, Massachusetts will benefit from an 11.6 acre salt marsh restoration project along the southeast coast near Cape Cod. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investing $2.2 million to restore the tidal flow near the 70-acre Meadow Shores Marsh, in part by replacing the defunct wooden culvert beneath Ray Peck Drive as shown in the featured photos. The salt marshes act as a buffer against coastal flooding during severe storms, which helps protect nearby communities. The project is expected to begin this fall, supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery.

View photos of Round Hill salt marsh
More about the Round Hill salt marsh restoration project


Staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assess a clogged inlet at an old culvert scheduled to be replaced this fall to restore natural marsh. Credit: Lia McLaughlin/USFWS


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Last updated: April 20, 2015