Hurricane Sandy Recovery - U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Hurricane Sandy Mitigation and ResiliencE Projects Funded October 2013 (PDF)


Hurricane Sandy Construction Projects Funded May 2013


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Two hundred tons of debris removed from Forsythe refuge

PHOTO: Mike Durfee oversees water-based debris removal at the refuge.March 18, 2014 – Crews working by both land and water have achieved a cleanup milestone as they complete the first phase of a multi-million dollar operation at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, N.J. With the aid of heavy equipment and barges, workers for regional contractor Coastal Environment Group have successfully removed over 200 tons of debris—an amount equivalent in weight to 100 cars, 80 great white sharks or a blue whale—from coastal marsh areas in Brick Township.

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PHOTO: Mike Durfee oversees water-based debris removal at the refuge.
Credit: Ryan Hagerty/USFWS


Five-refuge team restores emergency evacuation route at Virginia’s Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

Five-refuge team restores emergency evacuation route at Virginia’s Back BayMar. 6, 2014 – At the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia Beach, a team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service maintenance workers from five different refuges have repaired seven and a half miles of a road and dike that eroded during Hurricane Sandy. The team used 4,850 tons of stone to regrade and stabilize the road, and improve drainage to better weather future storms. Their work restored an important emergency evacuation route for residents of coastal North Carolina.

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PHOTO: An important emergency evacuation route that eroded during Hurricane Sandy is restored for residents of coastal North Carolina at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.
Greg Owens/USFWS


Debris cleanup completed at Long Island’s Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area

PHOTO: Wildlife biologist Robin Donohue of US Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region surveys the debris field at Long Island's Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area.Mar. 4, 2014 –The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has completed the first leg of a multi-million dollar cleanup effort on the first of 8 units at the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Crews staffed by local contractor Coastal Environment Group completed a water-based debris removal project at Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area this week, and will proceed next to the Elizabeth A. Morton refuge to remove additional debris left behind by 2012’s Hurricane Sandy. Located near the town of Long Beach, Lido Beach WMA was one of the sites most heavily impacted by coastal debris including roofs, docks, boats, household chemicals and empty drums, and its restoration will improve habitat for Atlantic brant, American black duck and over 200 other species of birds.

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PHOTO: Wildlife biologist Robin Donohue of US Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region surveys the debris field at Long Island's Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area.
Credit: Tom Sturm/USFWS


Inland refuge tells a different Sandy story

Jan. 29, 2014 - While much of the east coast was suffering from storm surge, flooding and high winds during Hurricane Sandy, West Virginia’s Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge found itself buried in up to three feet of heavy, wet snow. Refuge staff worked with local, regional and national agencies and organizations to clear roads and help provide food, water and electrical generators to residents in surrounding communities, many of whom were trapped in their homes. After weeks of digging out and restoring power, followed by a summer of gradually clearing downed trees from trails, the refuge completed its cleanup from the storm.

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Hurricane Sandy dumped up to three feet of snow at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge visitor center was inaccessible after the storm.
PHOTO: Richard Zane/USFWS


Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge rebuilds after Hurricane Sandy

Jan. 15, 2014 - In May of 2013, the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge received more than $2 million in recovery funding after being battered by Hurricane Sandy. Many of the refuge’s repair and reconstruction efforts are now complete. Damaged buildings have been restored and scores of flattened trees have been removed from wooded areas. Backup generators and a solar power system have been designed and will soon be installed. In addition, work will begin shortly to restore a washed-out beach road, with an estimated mid-April completion date. The Service is also planning coastal resiliency projects at Chincoteague that will help protect the refuge and surrounding communities from future storms.

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PHOTO: The storm surge from Hurricane Sandy left much of Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge under water, including this boat ramp along the Assateague Channel.
Credit: J. Fair/USFWS


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