Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
USGS launches Hurricane Sandy website

PHOTO:  Oblique aerial photographs of Neponsit, New York, looking northwest across Rockaway Peninsula, adjacent to New York Harbor. Sand was washed from the beach into the streets, and towards the bayside of the island, and several rows of ocean-facing houses were destroyed or damaged. Credit: USGS

June 27, 2014 - The U.S. Geological Survey has launched a new website that is a centralized source for USGS scientific publications, data, news and images related to Hurricane Sandy. The site also provides shared public information on coastal change; coastal elevation mapping; hydrology and storm surge; ecosystem impacts and environmental quality/contaminants. Visual elements of the site include Sandy before and after photos, extensive aerial photography and before and after LIDAR topography of New York’s Fire Island.

Visit the USGS Hurricane Sandy site



PHOTO: Oblique aerial photographs of Neponsit, New York, looking northwest across Rockaway Peninsula, adjacent to New York Harbor. Sand was washed from the beach into the streets, and towards the bayside of the island, and several rows of ocean-facing houses were destroyed or damaged.
Credit: USGS


Service, North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative to lead collaborative study of beach habitat resilience

PHOTO: Piping plover and chicks at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.

June 23, 2014 - The Department of the Interior has awarded a $1.75 million grant to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to lead a collaborative study into the effects of sea-level rise and increasingly frequent and severe storms on Atlantic Coast beach habitats. The project, facilitated by the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and Northeast Climate Science Center (CSC) expands on an LCC-funded study of how piping plover breeding habitat will change as a result of sea-level rise and intense storms predicted with a changing climate. One part of the project already underway is the development and application of an iPhone app (iPlover) for plover stewards to use to record key attributes of plover nesting habitat on beaches throughout the Northeast region. Pilot efforts with this application are taking place on national wildlife refuges and national parks in 2014.

Read more
View photos of plovers and plover habitat


PHOTO: Piping plover and chicks at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.
Credit: Kaiti Titherington/USFWS


Interior Secretary announces $102 million in Coastal Resilience Grants to help Atlantic coast communities withstand future storms

June 16, 2014 – Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced $102 million in competitive matching grants to support 54 projects along the Atlantic coast. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the grants will fund science-based solutions to restore an estimated 6,634 acres of wetlands and marshes; 225 acres of beach; and 364 acres of riparian buffers (vegetation lining streams), which help strengthen coasts to withstand future storms and sea-level rise. Other projects include dam removals and culvert replacements, which will open 287 miles of streams to fish passage while reducing flood risks to communities. Many projects will be complementary to similar U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service efforts already underway along the Atlantic coast. The projects also will provide an economic boost, creating hundreds of jobs in local communities.

Read more about Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resilience Grants



PHOTO: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland is one of 54 project sites that will benefit from Department of the Interior grants announced today.
Credit: Ray Paterra/USFWS


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Last updated: July 23, 2014