Building a Stronger Coast
Wreck Pond, NJ Inlet and Dune Restoration Breaks Ground

This excavator is preparing the site for the installation of the steel sheeting, wooden pilings, and the new culvert. Construction will start on the pond end of the culvert and end on the oceanside.

January 12, 2016 – The Wreck Pond Inlet and dunes restoration project broke ground in mid December in Monmouth County, N.J. This project will construct a 600-foot secondary culvert connecting Wreck Pond to the ocean and enhancing fish passage, improving water quality, and reducing flooding risks. Work is anticipated to be completed in summer 2017. The project is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in partnership with American Littoral Society (ALS) among others, with weekly construction updates posted at www.wreckpond.org

View more photos of the Wreck Pond restoration
More about the Wreck Pond inlet and dunes restoration project
View project updates on the American Littoral Society Wreck Pond blog

This excavator is preparing the site for the installation of the steel sheeting, wooden pilings, and the new culvert. Construction will start on the pond end of the culvert and end on the oceanside. Credit: Katie Conrad/USFWS


Salt Marsh Restoration Work Under Way on Long Island

A low ground pressure excavator is moved into position on the salt marsh at Seatuck National Wildlife Refuge and will be used to spread freshly dredged sand in waterlogged section of marsh.

January 8, 2016 –  Salt marsh restoration work is under way at Seatuck National Wildlife Refuge in Islip, N.Y. This is part of a larger $11 million effort that restores natural functions in damaged and degraded coastal salt marshes on Long Island. This phase of the project involves a coordinated effort between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Suffolk County Department of Public Works.  Sand generated by a dredging project in Champlin Creek is being pumped through pipes onto the refuge.  Once on the refuge, Service contractors are using special equipment to spread the sand over waterlogged sections of the marsh. The treated areas will be able to support native salt marsh vegetation and will strengthen the overall health and resiliency of the marsh ecosystem.

More about the Long Island Salt Marsh Restoration project



A low ground pressure excavator is moved into position on the salt marsh at Seatuck National Wildlife Refuge and will be used to spread freshly dredged sand in waterlogged section of marsh. Credit: C. Comber/USFWS


Healing the Great Marsh in Massachusetts

The ditch remediation technique is used on these newly mowed and filled salt marsh ditches in the Great Marsh. Two bailing twines on stakes keep the rolled hay in the ditch.

January 7, 2016 – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with several partners, is using a ditch remediation technique to raise the floor of man-made ditches in the saltmarshes of Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. These trenches, originally used to drain the marshes for mosquito control and agriculture, make the marshes more susceptible to flooding. The goal of the project is to increase salt marsh elevation, thereby increasing its resilience to rising sea levels.

Blog post
View photos of Great Marsh Restoration Project
More about restoring resilience to the Great Marsh

The ditch remediation technique is used on these newly mowed and filled salt marsh ditches in the Great Marsh. Two bailing twines on stakes keep the rolled hay in the ditch. Credit: Burdick, Peter, Moore, Adamowicz and Wilson


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Last updated: January 7, 2016