Building a Stronger Coast
Debris Cleanup Completed at Forsythe Refuge

An aerial view of a section of E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. Nearly 1,900 tons of debris left behind by Hurricane Sandy have been removed from the 47,000 acre refuge.

July 2, 2015 – Nearly 1,900 tons of debris left behind by Hurricane Sandy have been removed from Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge along 22 miles of coastline. Refuge Manager Virginia Rettig said removing the debris would allow coastal areas to recover, which will provide healthier habitat for native wildlife and help act as a buffer against future storms. The more than $13 million project overseen by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service cleaned up approximately 32,000 acres of saltmarsh and coastal habitat areas. The clean up and a future marsh enhancement project expected to begin this winter are funded by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 through the Department of the Interior. 

News Release
More about all Sandy-funded New Jersey recovery and resilience projects


An aerial view of a section of E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge. Nearly 1,900 tons of debris left behind by Hurricane Sandy have been removed from the 47,000 acre refuge. Credit: Keith Shannon/USFWS


Sandy Projects Help Implement President's Climate Action Plan

Restoring marsh hydrology at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Delaware, part of a $38 million marsh restoration project funded through the Department of the Interior by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013.

June 25, 2015 - This week marked the second anniversary of President Obama's Climate Action Plan. See how investments in Hurricane Sandy recovery are translating the plan's goals to action to make communities more resilient to increasingly intense future storms predicted with a changing climate.

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Restoring marsh hydrology at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Delaware, part of a $38 million marsh restoration project funded through the Department of the Interior by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013. Credit: David Eisenhauer/USFWS


People Behind a Stronger Coast: Eric Derleth

Eric Derleth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Coordinator of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program, shows Rebecca Wodder, former Senior Advisor to Secretary of the Interior, a photo of a dam removed in 2012.

June 12, 2015 - Eric Derleth has been given unprecedented opportunities to contribute to conservation over the course of his 37-year career with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Currently as Coordinator of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program with the Service, Derleth is overseeing four projects in Massachusetts supported by Hurricane Sandy resilience funding. Three of the four - Muddy Creek, Parkers River and Round Hill - are tidal marsh restoration projects. The fourth is removal of the West Britannia Dam on the Mill River in Taunton, Mass. These projects will restore coastal salt marsh health and natural tidal flow, allow fish passage and aid in public safety through some of the $15.6 million dollars the Service is investing in Massachusetts from the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013.

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More about Hurricane Sandy-funded projects


Eric Derleth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Coordinator of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program, shows Rebecca Wodder, former Senior Advisor to Secretary of the Interior, a photo of a dam removed in 2012. Credit: Jan Rowan/USFWS


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Last updated: May 1, 2015