Building a Stronger Coast
Nearly 600 tons in 2.5 months: Final phase of Post-Sandy cleanup effort continues along the Jersey Shore

A large recreational boat, one of the many items blown into the E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, was removed as crews return the Jersey shoreline to pre-storm conditions this winter.

December 24, 2014 - The second and final phase of a multimillion-dollar debris cleanup at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge continues in southern New Jersey’s Barnegat and Stafford Townships, retrieving large debris items including recreational boats, docks, boardwalks and oil tanks, resulting from 2012’s Hurricane Sandy. Nearly 600 tons of debris were extracted from refuge marshes since clean up began. As during the first phase, all debris must be handpicked, relying on specialized equipment to minimize damage to the salt marsh. Crews are expected to complete the project by spring 2015.

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A large recreational boat, one of the many items blown into the E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, was removed as crews return the Jersey shoreline to pre-storm conditions this winter. Credit: Donjon Marine, Inc.


Long Island Project Offers Marsh Protection near Suffolk and Nassau Counties

Above the marsh at Seatuck National Wildlife Refuge, one of the three units targeted for salt marsh restoration that will help protect nearby communities in Suffolk and Nassau Counties during future storm events.

December 18, 2014 - Communities near the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Suffolk and Nassau Counties will benefit from a 567-acre salt marsh restoration project at Wertheim and Seatuck National Wildlife Refuges and the Lido Beach Wildlife Management Area. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded a $7.2 million contract this month for the project, which will restore coastal marshes and an access boardwalk at the complex. The coastal marshes are a natural defense against hurricanes and other severe storms, and can help protect the nearby communities of Islip, and Shirley and Lido Beach, New York. Massachusetts-based contractor, Perini Management Services, is expected to begin work in fall 2015 under the contract. Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex comprises 6,500 acres, and includes nine National Wildlife Refuge units and one Wildlife Management Area. The project is supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery.

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More about the Long Island salt marsh restoration project


Above the marsh at Seatuck National Wildlife Refuge, one of the three units targeted for salt marsh restoration that will help protect nearby communities in Suffolk and Nassau Counties during future storm events. Credit: Keith Shannon/USFWS


Workshop offers perspective on Hurricane Sandy tidal marsh projects

More than 50 participants with academic, NGO, state and federal affiliations met this week to exchange information on Hurricane Sandy tidal marsh resilience science projects and align common goals for future work.

December 12, 2014 - This week, more than 50 participants representing universities, non-profit organizations, and state and federal agencies gathered at the Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Office to exchange information from the first year of Hurricane Sandy tidal marsh resiliency science projects, and to align efforts toward common goals over the next two years. Coordinated by the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative, the workshop provided a forum for partners working on projects ranging from site-specific restoration to regional coastal resilience models to discuss progress, needs, and strategies to collectively guide regional conservation planning in the face of coastal change. “I’m thrilled about how we are using this funding as an opportunity to collect solid baseline information,” said Jan Taylor, coordinator of Hurricane Sandy resiliency projects on national wildlife refuges in the Northeast. “We’ve done so much within nine months. I’m amazed we already have such solid partnerships and thoughts about how to improve collaboration for the future.” With greater perspective on the overall scope of Hurricane Sandy projects, participants helped to identify next steps for ensuring that individual projects contribute to overall goals. Key considerations for moving forward include determining appropriate and consistent ways to measure resilience and effectiveness or restoration at different scales, linking projects across scales, coordinating spatial data management, coordinating monitoring locations and needs, sharing data and decision tools, and communicating uncertainty in models at local levels.

More about LCC Hurricane Sandy Resilience Science Projects
More about all Hurricane Sandy projects


More than 50 participants with academic, NGO, state and federal affiliations met this week to exchange information on Hurricane Sandy tidal marsh resilience science projects and align common goals for future work. Credit: Bridget Macdonald/USFWS


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Last updated: January 7, 2015