Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
Two Years Later: Projects After Sandy Make Coastal Areas More Resilient to Future Storms

Brian Braudis (Cape May NWR manager) greeting Secretary Jewell at Reeds Beach in Middle Township, NJ.

Since Hurricane Sandy roared ashore in 2012, the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of the Interior have worked with partners to restore and strengthen coastal areas to help local communities as well as wildlife better withstand future storms. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today toured restoration projects at Reed's Beach and Cape May National Wildlife Refuge. Overall, the Department of the Interior is investing $787 million on recovery and resiliency projects up and down the Atlantic Coast in the aftermath of Sandy.

News release
Photos of New Jersey beach restoration


Brian Braudis (Cape May NWR manager) greeting Secretary Jewell at Reeds Beach in Middle Township, NJ
Credit: USFWS


#StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Marsh

#StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Marsh

September 30, 2014 - Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service launches the second in a series of videos highlighting communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy and their journey toward recovery. This video describes how Department of the Interior funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery, including a $340,000 Parker River Resilience project led by the Service and a $2.9 million grant administered through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and led by National Wildlife Federation, is working together to protect coastal communities along the North Shore of Massachusetts from storms and flooding by strengthening the natural barriers upon which many communities depend. At the same time, the project will help Great Marsh towns like Essex, Mass., whose Selectman Lisa O’Donnell describes how working with local partners is crucial for environmental and economic reasons in a town surrounded by marsh.

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More about the Hurricane Sandy Great Marsh restoration project
View photos of coastal restoration work in the Great Marsh

VIDEO: #StrongAfterSandy Feature: The Communities of the Great Marsh. Credit: USFWS


Contracts awarded to complete Sandy cleanup at Forsythe Refuge

PHOTO: Aerial view of coastline at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, where the final phase of cleanup resumes in October. Credit: Keith Shannon/USFWS

September 29, 2014 -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just awarded two contracts this month, valued at more than $4 million total for the final phase of the largest post-Hurricane Sandy debris cleanup on the Atlantic coast. Two New Jersey-based contractors, Donjon Marine, Inc. and Clean Venture, Inc., will work towards returning the Jersey shoreline to pre-storm conditions, offering visitors opportunities for safe and healthy outdoor experiences at these natural areas once again. The Service has currently removed more than 430 tons of debris from marshes, streams and wooded areas in the northern portion of a 22-mile stretch of coastline managed by the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, which was impacted during Sandy's October 2012 landfall. Recovery efforts will clean up several remaining areas of the refuge such as Stafford, Eagleswood, Tuckerton, Lacey, Galloway and Barnegat, as well as other locations within the refuge boundaries. The work is expected to be completed this February.

View the news bulletin
More about Hurricane Sandy recovery projects at Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
View photos of debris removal work at Forsythe

PHOTO: Aerial view of coastline at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, where the final phase of cleanup resumes in October. Credit: Keith Shannon/USFWS


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Last updated: October 21, 2014