Building a Stronger Coast
Service invites public input to environmental assessment for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge marsh restoration project

View from above between the Prime Hook Beach community and Slaughter Beach taken after Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, the area targeted for tidal marsh restoration that will help protect nearby communities along Delaware Bay during future storm events.

February 23, 2015 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public input on its environmental assessment (EA) as it evaluates the restoration of a 4,000-acre tidal marsh at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge along Delaware Bay. The EA will be available for public review and comment for 30 days through March 25, 2015. The project is supported by federal funding from the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Act.

View News Release
More about the Prime Hook tidal marsh restoration project


View from above between the Prime Hook Beach community and Slaughter Beach taken after Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, the area targeted for tidal marsh restoration that will help protect nearby communities along Delaware Bay during future storm events. Credit: USFWS


People Behind a Stronger Coast: Martha Naley

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Martha Naley sees new conservation opportunities emerging in the wake of 2012’s Hurricane Sandy.

February 5, 2015 -  In the first in a series of profiles focusing on the people behind the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s collaborative efforts to build a stronger Atlantic Coast, Service biologist Martha Naley discusses how federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery is helping to support a range of projects involving dam removal, flood resiliency and stream restoration. “The Sandy funds make it possible for people to do the right thing – in terms of the environment and the economy,” she says.

Read the blog post
More about Sandy-funded dam removal projects


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Martha Naley sees new conservation opportunities emerging in the wake of 2012’s Hurricane Sandy. Credit: USFWS


Partners launch Restore Delaware Bay website

A new website offers information on restoration work in progress along New Jersey’s Delaware Bay.

February 4, 2015 - The American Littoral Society and Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey have launched a new website describing how they are working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other partners to restore an ecologically healthy and resilient Delaware Bay region for wildlife and nearby communities. The site provides information on beach restoration, marsh restoration, oyster reefs, and monitoring along the Jersey coast, including various federally funded Hurricane Sandy projects.

Visit the Restore Delaware Bay website



A new website offers information on restoration work in progress along New Jersey’s Delaware Bay. Credit: American Littoral Society/Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey


Previous Next

More Stories

Connect with Us

Facebook Flickr Twitter Wordpress YouTube RSS

Infographic: Building a Stronger Coast

Thumbnail of Hurricane Sandy infographic


Restoration & Repair Videos


Hurricane Sandy Photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: January 7, 2015