Building a Stronger Coast
Fish Monitoring for Restoration of Wreck Pond in New Jersey

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff from the New Jersey Field Office along with partner, American Littoral Society, monitor fish passage at Wreck Pond near Spring Lake and Sea Girt, New Jersey, in order to understand herring spawning success before and after a new 600-foot culvert is installed this fall, part of a Hurricane Sandy funded resilience project.

May 8, 2015 - A series of fish monitoring surveys began this week in preparation for a 600-feet long, 6-by 8-feet wide culvert pipe that will be installed this fall at Wreck Pond in New Jersey. This project is part of a larger $3.85 million habitat restoration project, funded by Hurricane Sandy resilience investments and led by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, working with local and state partners. The new culvert will open up two miles of fish passage to spawning and nursery habitat for herring and eels, as well as other species, such as perch and catfish. Increased outflow and inflow from the ocean through a larger pipe will also help reduce flooding impacts to nearby towns of Sea Girt and Spring Lake, while improving water quality and habitat around the impaired 73-acre pond.

Photos of fish monitoring at Wreck Pond
Recent press coverage on Wreck Pond restoration project


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff from the New Jersey Field Office along with partner, American Littoral Society, monitor fish passage at Wreck Pond near Spring Lake and Sea Girt, New Jersey, in order to understand herring spawning success before and after a new 600-foot culvert is installed this fall, part of a Hurricane Sandy funded resilience project. Credit: Katie Conrad/USFWS


Future Conservationists Help Strengthen Coastal Maine

Megan Zopfi, biological sciences technician at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, gets her hands dirty as she prepares soil for plants with a Coastal Studies for Girls team member.

May 7, 2015 - A group of sophomore high school students from Coastal Studies for Girls (CSG) in Freeport, Maine continued Rachel Carson’s conservation legacy by supporting coastal restoration efforts this spring at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells, Maine. Students and alumni worked with team members from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, transplanting a variety of natives such as Virginia rose, bayberry and chokecherry to be planted at refuge sites in Maine this fall. The plantings are part of an ongoing effort, funded by Hurricane Sandy recovery investments through the Department of the Interior, to enhance natural defenses that protect wildlife and coastal communities against future storms.

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Megan Zopfi, biological sciences technician at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, gets her hands dirty as she prepares soil for plants with a Coastal Studies for Girls team member. Credit: Amber Lira/USFWS


E.B. Forsythe Refuge Project Offers Marsh Protection

Aerial view of E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, where hundreds of unused utility poles will be removed to enhance 600 acres of salt marsh habitat.

May 1, 2015 - People and wildlife near Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge on the New Jersey shore will benefit from a restoration project to improve several thousand acres of coastal marsh habitat at the refuge. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded two contracts last month totaling nearly $6 million for work to improve degraded salt marsh habitat throughout the refuge and restore constructed wetlands at refuge headquarters near Oceanville. The project is designed to strengthen natural barriers that protect surrounding communities against future storms, while improving water quality and outdoor recreational opportunities. Contractor Amec Foster Wheeler will complete the work during the next two years with oversight from Service engineers. Construction is expected to begin later this year after design and construction plans are developed and necessary permits are secured.

More about the E.B. Forsythe Refuge resilience project



Aerial view of E.B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, where hundreds of unused utility poles will be removed to enhance 600 acres of salt marsh habitat. Credit: Keith Shannon/USFWS


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Last updated: May 1, 2015