Hurricane Sandy Recovery
Recovery, restoration & building coastal resilience
Two Years After Sandy: Reducing Flood and Fire Impacts in Virginia and North Carolina

VIDEO: Flying over Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, where 22 water control structures will be installed or repaired in Virginia.

October 30, 2014 - Water management restoration efforts are planned for Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina, where $3.1 million in Hurricane Sandy resilience funding will repair or install 22 water control structures to reduce impacts of flood and fire in nearby Chesapeake and Suffolk, Va. Due to 150-miles of historical logging ditches built on the refuge in the 1700s, the altered swamp hydrology affects the impacts on public health, tourism and wildlife habitat. This project will increase the water storage of the 112,000 acre contiguous forest, making it more resilient to the predicted effects of climate change such as increased storms, wildfires, and drought. Rare forest stands of Atlantic white-cedar still remain in this unique habitat, along with 47 mammals and over 200 species of birds.

View aerial footage: Flying over Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge
More about the Great Dismal Swamp water management project
Blog post featuring the Great Dismal Swamp resilience project

VIDEO: Flying over Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, where 22 water control structures will be installed or repaired in Virginia. Credit: USFWS


Two Years After Sandy: Protecting the Chesapeake Bay Shoreline

VIDEO: Flying over Glenn Martin National Wildlife Refuge, where a 20,950 foot living shoreline will be constructed at Fog Point in Smith Island, Md.

October 29, 2014 - Shoreline restoration efforts are planned for Glenn Martin National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland, where $9 million in Hurricane Sandy resilience funding will construct 20,950 feet of living shoreline to dissipate wave energy and slow erosion. The project protects 1,200 acres of vulnerable marsh land and supports the Chesapeake Bay region’s local economy and culture. This marsh is vital to the continued habitat health of Smith Island’s soft crab fishing industry and for protecting the residential villages of Ewell, Rhodes Point and Tylerton. The refuge supports one of the largest concentrations of wintering waterfowl in the Chesapeake Bay, as well as important habitat for fisheries and non-game wildlife. 

View aerial footage: Flying over Glenn Martin National Wildlife Refuge
More about the Fog Point Living Shoreline restoration project
Blog post featuring the Glenn Martin living shoreline project

VIDEO: Flying over Glenn Martin National Wildlife Refuge, where a 20,950 foot living shoreline will be constructed at Fog Point in Smith Island, Md. Credit: USFWS


Story Map Offers Interactive Tour of Hurricane Sandy Projects

The story map features images, information and links about our Hurricane Sandy projects.

October 28, 2014 - Our new story map - Building a More Resilient Atlantic Coast - offers you an interactive, web-based way to learn about recovery and resilience projects managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It uses GIS technology to present information, images and links about the more than 80 projects underway in 14 states.

Visit the story map: Building a More Resilient Atlantic Coast
View the tutorial: How to use the story map


The story map features images, information and links about our Hurricane Sandy projects. Credit: USFWS


Next

More Stories

Connect with Us

Facebook Flickr Twitter Wordpress YouTube RSS

Restoration & Repair Videos


Hurricane Sandy Photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: October 28, 2014