Building a Stronger Coast
Science ahead of the storm may inform marsh restoration at Prime Hook NWR

Laura Mitchell

New science used to measure the effects of storms like Winter Storm Jonas on coastal areas along the Atlantic could help inform marsh restoration efforts at Delaware's Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge.

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Laura Mitchell, Regional Coastal Ecologist for the Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System in the Northeast Region, helps deploy storm-tide sensors at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge ahead of Winter Storm Jonas.
Credit: USFWS


Muddy Creek Restoration Project underway to restore habitat and enhance natural defenses against storm surge

Initial removal of the MA Rte. 28 road surface and roadbed

January 28, 2016 - The Massachusetts towns of Harwich and Chatham in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have begun construction on a tidal marsh restoration project to enhance natural coastal defenses against storm surge. The $5.2 million project aims to restore a mix of estuarine and subtidal wetlands, improve water quality and restore passage for fish that migrate between fresh and saltwater. The project is supported by $3.3 million in federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery and a $1 million National Coastal Wetland Conservation Grant administered by the FWS with the remaining funds provided by the towns, Commonwealth of Massachusetts and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

News release
More about the Muddy Creek Wetland Restoration Project
Project photos

Initial removal of the MA Rte. 28 road surface and roadbed.
Credit: USFWS


Wreck Pond, NJ Inlet and Dune Restoration Breaks Ground

This excavator is preparing the site for the installation of the steel sheeting, wooden pilings, and the new culvert. Construction will start on the pond end of the culvert and end on the oceanside.

January 12, 2016 – The Wreck Pond Inlet and dunes restoration project broke ground in mid December in Monmouth County, N.J. This project will construct a 600-foot secondary culvert connecting Wreck Pond to the ocean and enhancing fish passage, improving water quality, and reducing flooding risks. Work is anticipated to be completed in summer 2017. The project is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in partnership with American Littoral Society (ALS) among others, with weekly construction updates posted at www.wreckpond.org

View more photos of the Wreck Pond restoration
More about the Wreck Pond inlet and dunes restoration project
View project updates on the American Littoral Society Wreck Pond blog

This excavator is preparing the site for the installation of the steel sheeting, wooden pilings, and the new culvert. Construction will start on the pond end of the culvert and end on the oceanside. Credit: Katie Conrad/USFWS


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Last updated: January 7, 2016