Hurricane Sandy Recovery - U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Hurricane Sandy Mitigation and ResiliencE Projects Funded October 2013 (PDF)


Hurricane Sandy Construction Projects Funded May 2013


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Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges repair damage to coastal units

PHOTO: Boarding up the Kettle Pond Visitor Center at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in preparation for Hurricane Sandy, 2012.April 16, 2014 - Despite 2012 preparations in the face of Hurricane Sandy’s path, units at the Rhode Island national wildlife refuges suffered damage to roads, trails, buildings and water control structures. This spring, repairs will be made to roofs at the Sachuest Point visitor center, maintenance shed and a pond house, providing improved safety and shelter to the public and refuge staff. The refuges - Block Island, Chafee, Ninigret, Sachuest Point and Trustom Pond - total about 2,400 acres. Over 400 species of birds use the protected habitat to rest and feed during spring and fall migrations, including the federally threatened piping plover.

More about national wildlife refuges in Rhode Island
More about the piping plover


PHOTO: Boarding up the Kettle Pond Visitor Center at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge in preparation for Hurricane Sandy, 2012.
Credit: USFWS


Delaware Bay beach restorations continue until horseshoe crabs arrive

PHOTO: Replenishing thousands of tons of sand that was washed away during Hurricane Sandy will assure that annually returning horseshoe crabs have a place to spawn.April 10, 2014 - Post-Hurricane Sandy beach restoration efforts on New Jersey’s Delaware Bay are proceeding at a rapid pace, replenishing areas critical to horseshoe crab spawning and bird migration. With Kimbles Beach completed, up to 70 truckloads of sand were being hauled daily amongst Moores Beach, Reeds Beach, Cooks Beach, and Pierces Point this week. This will provide a larger berm for habitat restoration, and as a secondary benefit, adjacent residential homes and infrastructure will gain improved protection from coastal storm surges. The crabs are expected to return in early May, when they crawl up on moonlit beaches to spawn. Crab eggs are invaluable sources of protein for migratory bird species like the red knot, which is being considered for listing on the federal endangered species list. Approximately 50% of their declining population has been estimated to stop for refueling at Delaware Bay beaches.

View an Infographic on Red Knot Migration
View media coverage: video on restoration of Jersey beaches


PHOTO: Replenishing thousands of tons of sand that was washed away during Hurricane Sandy will assure that annually returning horseshoe crabs have a place to spawn.
Credit: Gregory Breese/USFWS


Service leads effort to restore New Jersey beaches impacted by Hurricane Sandy

PHOTO: Specialized earth-movers deposit thousands of tons of sand at Reeds Beach on New Jersey’s Delaware Bay.April 3, 2014 - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is coordinating an effort to restore five New Jersey beaches that suffered severe erosion from Hurricane Sandy. The project’s goal is to replenish the beaches by early May. Using $1.65 million in Hurricane Sandy mitigation funds from the Department of the Interior, the restoration effort will trace the coast of Delaware Bay, where large debris including chunks of asphalt and bricks, concrete pipes, slabs, and pilings will be cleared and approximately 45,000 tons of sand will be deposited at area beaches. A replenished shoreline will encourage  the return of horseshoe crabs for seasonal spawning, whose eggs are a food staple for the declining migratory bird, the red knot. The Service is supporting the effort in partnership with the American Littoral Society, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Army Corps of Engineers.

View Photos of Beach Restoration
Learn More About Species and Habitat Preservation on Delaware Bay


PHOTO: Specialized earth-movers deposit thousands of tons of sand at Kimbles Beach on New Jersey’s Delaware Bay.
Credit: Eric Schrading/USFWS


Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge plans for future storms

A tree blown down by the storm falls on electrical power lines at the refuge.March 27, 2014 – When Hurricane Sandy hit on October 2012, the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in northern New Jersey was left dark for weeks. Since the extended post-storm power outage, contingency planning has been underway for the next big weather event. Thanks to recovery funding, a number of repairs have been completed, and plans to install backup and solar power systems  are in progress. These systems are expected to maximize the refuge’s resilience to future storms and shift on-site utilities to draw upon more reliable and renewable power sources.

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More About Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge


PHOTO: A tree blown down by the storm falls on electrical power lines at the refuge.
Credit: David Sagan/USFWS


Dock rebuild scheduled for Connecticut’s Falkner Island

At Connecticut’s Falkner Island, an important nesting area for endangered Roseate terns and other species, a dock will be rebuilt after sustaining damage from Hurricane Sandy to restore access to visitors and refuge staff. (Credit: Greg Thompson/USFWS)March 24, 2014 - Work will begin this spring to rebuild a dock at Connecticut’s Falkner Island that was badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy. The dock, used by preservation partners and the visiting public for open houses, will be rebuilt by New Jersey-based Puente Construction. Falkner Island, a unit of the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge, is home to Connecticut’s second-oldest lighthouse and has been designated as an Important Bird Area by the National Audubon Society. The island is home to over 200 species of birds, including 40 pairs of nesting federally endangered roseate terns and over 2,000 nesting pairs of common terns. It also serves as important habitat for seals, bats and fish species. 

View Photos of Falkner Island
More about Stewart B. McKinney Refuge


PHOTO: At Connecticut’s Falkner Island, an important nesting area for endangered Roseate terns and other species, a dock will be rebuilt after sustaining damage from Hurricane Sandy to restore access to visitors and refuge staff.
Credit: Greg Thompson/USFWS


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