Building a Stronger Coast
New Jersey students shell out to help protect beach shoreline

First graders from the Boys and Girls Club of Vineland, N.J., carry a shell bag to help construct an oyster reef, part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gandy’s Beach shoreline protection project funded by Hurricane Sandy recovery investments.

May 22, 2015 - This year, several U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service projects funded with Hurricane Sandy resilience dollars are building living shorelines such as oyster reefs along the Atlantic Coast, to help bolster beaches and tidal marsh that protect coastal communities and sustain people and wildlife. One such project, Gandy’s Beach shoreline protection in Downe Township, New Jersey, is engaging local students to help build nearly 15,000 shell bags to construct an oyster reef that will help prevent beach erosion and provide wildlife habitat along the coast. Jenny Paterno, lab technician and project leader for Project PORTS, says more than 3,000 bags have been built by 650 students to date. When completed, the bags will be placed by hundreds of local volunteers just offshore to help construct a 3,000-foot living shoreline, expected this fall. The project is led by the Service’s New Jersey Field Office in partnership with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Project PORTS, an outreach initiative at Rutgers University’s Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory.

View blog post
More about the Gandy's Beach shoreline protection project
More about Project PORTS

First graders from the Boys and Girls Club of Vineland, N.J., carry a shell bag to help construct an oyster reef, part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gandy’s Beach shoreline protection project funded by Hurricane Sandy recovery investments. Credit: Project PORTS staff


Service Northeast Regional Director Tours Prime Hook Refuge Marsh Restoration Site with Senator Carper

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber and project partners tour Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, before a federally funded barrier marsh restoration project begins this summer. L to R: Senator Tom Carper (D-Del.); Al Rizzo, Refuge Manager, Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge; Lieutenant Colonel Michael A. Bliss, 58th Commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District; and Wendi Weber.

May 15, 2015 - Today Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service joined U.S. Senator Tom Carper (D-Del.) for a tour of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Milton, Delaware to view damage to the refuge created by Hurricane Sandy and learn about a nearly $40 million marsh restoration effort to ward against future storms and sea-level rise. The project will repair breached impoundments and reconstruct severely damaged shoreline, including critical dune restoration. It will also restore approximately 4,000 acres of back-barrier tidal marsh which will enhance and support a long stretch of barrier beach along the Delaware Bay. These investments will help minimize the effects on adjacent and nearby communities such as Milton and Milford, and create additional habitat for birds such as rufa red knots, American oystercatchers, and piping plovers. The Service has worked closely with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and private consultants to complete restoration plans and environmental compliance documents. Project Leader Al Rizzo says restoration plans will begin on schedule next month. “Nature can be a fortress, as well as a force,” said Weber. “We believe that by helping the natural landscape better withstand storms, sea-level rise and the effects of erosion, we can help communities and sustain wildlife for future generations.”

More about Hurricane Sandy funded projects at Prime Hook Refuge



U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber and project partners tour Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, before a federally funded barrier marsh restoration project begins this summer. L to R: Senator Tom Carper (D-Del.); Al Rizzo, Refuge Manager, Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge; Lieutenant Colonel Michael A. Bliss, 58th Commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District; and Wendi Weber. Credit: USFWS


Service Northeast Regional Director Tours New Jersey Beach Restoration Site

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Director Wendi Weber and other partners including David Mizrahi of New Jersey Audubon, tour the federally funded Stone Harbor Point beach restoration project on the New Jersey coast.

May 15, 2015 - This week on the coast of New Jersey, Regional Director Wendi Weber of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service joined local, state and federal officials on a tour of the federally funded Stone Harbor Point beach restoration project, followed by a visit to Fortescue Beach on the Delaware Bay to band shore birds for future monitoring. The Stone Harbor Point project, completed last March, was led by New Jersey Audubon, who joined forces with Conserve Wildlife of NJ and the Wetlands Institute to restore coastal habitat for threatened shorebirds and protect the nearby community. The Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife program provided substantial technical support. The restoration effort was funded by a $1.28 million grant from the Department of the Interior and administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, part of the Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resiliency Competitive Grant Program.

View photos of Stone Harbor visit and bird banding
More Stone Harbor project information
Recent press coverage

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Director Wendi Weber and other partners, including David Mizrahi of New Jersey Audubon, tour the federally funded Stone Harbor Point beach restoration project on the New Jersey coast. Credit: Eric Schrading/USFWS


Next

More Stories

Connect with Us

Facebook Flickr Twitter Wordpress YouTube RSS

State Fact Sheets - What's happening in your state?


Infographic: Building a Stronger Coast

Thumbnail of Hurricane Sandy infographic


Restoration & Repair Videos


Hurricane Sandy Photos

Last updated: May 1, 2015